Teaching Toward the Demands of the ccss



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Teaching Toward the Demands of the CCSS
We have designed this document to address the NY CCLS so have included the additional standards that NYS has included. We have drawn from guideline documents put out by the state, preparation materials such as those from Ready New York and our best knowledge of how to address the Common Core Standards to create this resource.

Third Grade

City/State Focused Standards:
Reading Literature, Grade 3
What the Standards Say…

In other words…

Text-Based Example
(Questions based on Fly Away Home by Eve Bunting
paired with

A Train to Somewhere by Eve Bunting)

How Else Might These Questions Be Worded…

3.1

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.


Students can ask and answer questions about what is happening in a story and whom it is happening to. They can also ask questions about where and why events happen.
(Details will be literal, inferential, and interpretative—answer will not always be an exact word/phrase which students can point to.)
Students might…

  • ask questions about how the characters are revealed through what they say, think, and do, as well as through what others say about them.

  • ask questions about the complex plot and theme of the book.

  • ask questions about why the character is feeling a certain way.

  • ask questions about the place and time of the story.

  • ask questions about the clues left by the author.




How does living in an airport make the boy feel? Support your answers with at least two details from the story.
Why does the author include this line of dialogue:

Don’t stop trying,” I told it silently. “Don’t! You can get out!”


Why does the author have the characters dress in blue?



  • Why did the character say what he/she said?




  • Why does the character do ________?




  • Why is the character in ____(place) in the ___(specific part of text)?




  • Which sentence tells what ____ feels when _____?




  • Which detail in the first part of the story explains why __________?




  • How does ______’s action affect the story?




  • Which of these would most likely happen in the beginning/ end/middle?




  • What are most of the characters representing?




  • Which words best describe_____?

3.2

Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details inthe text.

Students will be able to tell what happened in a story in their own words. They will be able to tell the most important key details of what happened in the story in order.
Students will be able to use the most important events in the story, or the key details, to think about and explain what lesson (or big idea or “central message”) the author might be trying to teach the reader.
Students might…

  • notice details around text structures.

  • notice details around what the author is doing and why.

  • notice details around the moral and the lesson learned.

  • notice details around the main meaning of the text and why.

  • notice details around the author’s use of complex language structures and how he/she is using them and why.



What do you think the central message of “Fly Away Home” might be?


Which detail about the bird is the most important to the central message of the story?

  • Based on the story, which two words best describe the _________ (character/object)?




  • What is the central message?




  • Which is the best recounting of _________?




  • Which detail about ________ is most important to the central message of the story?




  • What is the central message of the passage?




  • Recount the most important events in the folktale.




  • What is the lesson learned in this fable?




  • Which detail about _________ is the most important to the central message?



3.3

Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

Students will be able to describe what characters say and do, and why. They will name characters’ feelings and traits and describe how the characters’ words and actions make one event lead to another. So, they will explain the reasons why characters act and speak in certain ways. Students will describe how characters feel, what they are like, and why they do what they do.
Students might…

  • describe the characters’ traits.

  • describe a character’s actions and motivations and how they relate to the character’s trait.

  • describe motivations and how they impact the things that happen in a story.

  • describe motivations to interpret the problems that will ensue.

  • describe details surrounding time, place and occurrence.

  • describe the cause of why a character does or does not do something and the effects that result from this.

  • explain the inferential problem and solution.

  • describe the important minor characters that are in play and how they interact.

How does the boy feel as he watches the travellers coming and going in the airport?
How do the actions of the boy and the words the boy says help you understand what their life was like in the airport?
Describe what you think will happen if the boy and his father get noticed. Use two details from the text in your answer.



(Many of the questions listed in 3.1 could also meet this standard).


  • Why is __________ upset/happy/stupefied/other emotion?




  • How does ______’s words and actions help you understand what her character is like?




  • How do _______’s actions change ______?




  • Why is the ___________ in the _______ at the beginning of the story?




  • What make you think the character feels _________?




  • What would happen if the story was to continue?




  • What is _______ feeling after ______ happens?




  • What caused the main character to ______ ?




  • How do the character’s actions change the story?




  • The author shows ____ is a _____ type of person. Why?

  • 3.4

  •  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

Students will find clues in the text to understand the meaning of words by looking at the words around the unfamiliar word. They will use all that they know about words to find the meanings of unfamiliar words. Students will use their understanding that some words have more than one meaning and the meaning depends on the way the word is used in the story (the word in context) (e.g., “Snow blankets the ground”).
Students might…

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of academic vocabulary.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of domain specific vocabulary.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of figurative phrases and languages.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of dialogue.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of words with prefixes and suffixes.

“Dead time,” is what Dad calls the time between 2 am and 4 am in the airport. Why does he call it that ?
Read this phrase that the boy says to the bird: “Fly bird, fly away home.” What does that statement really mean to the boy?


  • What does the word _______ mean in this sentence?




  • Read the following line from the poem, “___.” What is the poet describing?




  • How do the words “_____” describe ______?




  • The author uses the word(s) _______ to show____?




  • What does the author show about _______ by describing it as “________”?




  • The word “_________”is like _________.




  • Read the phrase, sentence, word, what does it really mean about __________ ( about what the characters are doing)?




  • 3.5

  •  Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.




Students will know that poems look different from stories. They might tell stories, but they do not have to. They usually have shorter lines and may have white space. When lines are grouped together, that is called a stanza. Lines and stanzas in poems build on each other. Students will think about how poems are organized and what the main idea in each stanza might be. They will know that dramas are comprised of Acts which are made of scenes.

Students might…

  • refer to the structures of a text (poetry, drama, story).

  • accumulate information throughout the text.

  • understand and describe the features of the genre and how these features help them to pay attention to the text in a particular way.

  • describe the parts of the text.

How does the scene with the bird help you understand how badly the boy wants a place to belong?
By the end of the story, how do you think the boy is feeling about living in the airport?

  • At the beginning of the story ______ wants to _______.




  • How does the third scene in this story add to the character’s problem?




  • What happens in ______ (part of text) that makes _______’s problem worse?




  • How does the ending scene build on what began in scene one?




  • By the end of _______, do you think the character is _________(feeling) with her decision to ______?




  • In which scene does the __________ reach their ________?




  • In Scene ___, _______(event happens). What do we learn in Scene __(different scene) that explains _______(what happened in previous/later scene)?

3.6

 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.



Students will be able to describe how each person in the story feels about what is happening. They will also be able to describe their own personal point of view of what is happening.
Students might…

  • think about and describe how the narrator is thinking and feeling about the events and other characters.

  • think about and describe how each of the other characters is feeling.

  • describe which character is talking and why.

  • identify who is speaking (such as the narrator) and why.

There is one scene in the “Fly Away Home”, where Mr. Slocum and Mr. Vail are being taken away by the police. Look carefully at that scene. How might you compare the feelings of the security guards, Mr. Slocum and Mr Vail, and the boy and his father in that moment? What details in the text and illustrations support your comparisons?
The boy’s point of view about living in the airport is _________? How does your point of view about him living in the airport compare or contrast to his point of view?

  • Whose point of view is this?




  • How does _________’s point of view change on _______ when _______?




  • Why is it hard for _________ to _____________?




  • Which best describes the speaker’s point of view on ___________?




  • What are the first two stanzas of the poem mainly about?




  • How does this conversation make you feel?




  • Who is talking in the poem?




  • Why does the author most likely write this text for what type of audience?

  • 3.7

  •  Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)

Students will look at the illustrations in a story and think about how they help the reader to understand how characters feel and what the setting looks like. They will also explain the feelings they get from illustrations and the mood the illustrations are helping to create in the story.
Students might…

  • describe how illustrations add to the story.

  • describe how the illustrations create or add to the mood.

  • describe how the illustrations represent the external features of the character

  • describe how the illustrations add to the story’s setting.

  • describe how the illustrations create the mood and tone of the story.

Fly Away Home is written as an illustrated book. In the picture of Mr. Slocum and Mr. Vail being taken away by the airport security guards, what details do you learn from the illustrations that aren’t in the text?
In Fly Away Home how is the mood of the characters shown in the illustrations?

  • How would the mood of the story be different if_______?




  • What details in the picture help you understand more about _______(character)?




  • Based on the details in the picture, what is the mood of the _____?




  • Based on the picture and the story of _____, how would you describe _____? Use one detail from the picture and one detail from the story in your answer.




  • The illustration confirms the mood of the _________.




  • 3.9 

  • Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).

Students will look at books in a series or stories about the same character or type of character (e.g., a character who shows up in multiple folktales) and think about how the theme, settings, and plots are similar and different.
Students might…

  • describe how the themes carry over from one text to another and how they might contrast as well.

  • compare & contrast setting within one text and across multiple texts.

  • compare and contrast plots across texts.

  • compare and contrast across texts in a series.

What is the central message of Fly Away Home, and how does it compare and contrast with the central message of Eve Bunting’s other text A Train To Somewhere?
In the text A Train To Somewhere the kids are looking for a place to belong just like the boy is doing in Fly Away Home. How does Eve Bunting create similar characters in both books and how do their journeys seem similar and different?






  • Which is true about ________ in both stories?




  • Which is true about the setting in both stories?




  • Based on the other stories in this series you have read, what would be a good title for the next book in the series?




  • How are the main ideas of ______ and _____ different?

  • How is the central message of both texts similar even though the settings are different?




  • Which sentence from _____ best shows how the _____ is different?




3.11
Recognize and make connections in narratives, poetry, and drama to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, personal events, and situations.

.

Students will be able to compare and make connections across texts from a variety of cultures and genres. Students will also be able to compare and make connections from texts to personal events and situations.
Students might…

  • describe similarities and differences between cultural customs presented in a variety of texts.

  • compare and contrast events in texts with the events in his/her life.

  • compare and contrast situations presented in a text with personal experiences.



In Fly Away Home, how does the story of the boy and his father help us understand more about homelessness?






  • What are the similarities and differences between these two characters? Compare and contrast.




  • Which of the following is a key detail found in both texts?




  • How do the two texts from different countries represent the same cultural ideas?



City/State Focused Standards:
Reading Informational Texts, Grade 3
What the Standards Say…

In other words…

Text-Based Example
Questions based on The Great Wall of China by Leonard Everett Fisher (first five pages)

paired with
You Wouldn’t Want to Work on the Great Wall of China: Defenses You’d Rather Not Build by Jacqueline Morley (first page)



How Else Might These Questions Be Worded…

3.1

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Students will ask questions as they read to pay closer attention to what they are reading. They will ask and answer questions to get more information and they will show how and where they found the answer. They will build on the work of last year when they were expected to ask and answer questions such as “who, what, where, when, why, or how.”
Students may not be able to locate the answer to a question by pointing to a word/phrase in the text. They may need to think about multiple parts in the text and infer and interpret in order to answer questions.
Students might ask and answer questions about…

  • what’s important and why.

  • the different parts of the text and what’s important in each part.

  • the reason the text was written.

  • why the author wanted you to know this information.

  • the type of text it is to help you glean information (for example, is it persuasive, expository, narrative, etc.?).

  • the structures of the text and the information needed within these structures.

  • more challenging vocabulary.

  • complex and domain specific vocabulary (questions might lead a person to the meaning of this complex vocabulary word or phrase).




What is one problem that King Cheng faces when he becomes the first Emperor of China?
What happened first that made it possible for King Cheng to become the first emperor of China?
On the second page of the text, what do we learn about why the man has come to see King Cheng?

  • What’s the main idea of this part of the text?




  • According to the text and photos in the passage what do the photos show about the difference in the _______ (place/body features/objects/activity/…) from _____ and ______?




  • Which question could be answered by reading the first couple of paragraphs?




  • How did _____ (subject) _____ (accomplish an action)?




  • What causes _________ to ________?




  • Why do these __________ (subjects) ______ (take a specific action)?




  • What_____(objects/body features/…) do the _______ use to _______(take an action)?




  • Which question can be answered by reading paragraph __?




  • How do ___________ and ____________ use ______?




  • According to the article what do you do right before/right after …?




  • The passage explains all aspects of _____ EXCEPT______?




  • According to the passage by _______ (taking a specific action), you can tell if…?




  • What does the author mean when he says__________________?




  • What might a stubborn person say?




3.2

Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

Students will find the most important details in a passage (the key details) and put them together to find a main idea, or what the passage is mostly about. They will retell key details in order to show how they support the main idea.
Students might…

  • discuss the importance and significance of reoccurring details.

  • explain how text features add to the understanding of a topic or an idea.

  • locate the main ideas within parts of the text rather than locating one main idea across the whole text.

  • discuss how the main idea connects to why the author wrote the text in the first place.

  • identify the important details that led to the main idea of the text through understanding the structure of that text.

  • use important ideas, concepts and perspectives to identify the main idea.

  • use signal words that point to important details and information in the text.

  • Explain what the author is trying to say about the topic and why.




What main idea about King Cheng do you get from the first page?

How does the illustration at the bottom of page one help support the main idea about King Cheng?



  • How do _________?




  • Which detail in paragraph __ best supports the main idea of the passage?




  • In which part of the text does the main idea begin?




  • The main idea of section __ could be…?




  • A detail that supports the main idea is _______?




  • Which sentence from the passage explains what the author most wants readers to understand about ________?




  • Which detail in paragraph __ supports the main idea?




  • How do the details about the _______ help you understand the main idea of paragraph __?

3.3

Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

Students will pay attention to time, order, and sequence of events to keep track of when events happened. They will use signal words to get clues about the sequence (e.g., first, after, when, finally).
Students will pay attention to how one event is connected to another in order to understand why things happen. They will look for signal words that show cause-effect connections (e.g., because, therefore, as a result, this led to).
Students might…

  • compare and contrast historical events across time to see how they build on one another and the relationships between them.

  • describe the cause of why something happens and its relationship to/its effect on history.

  • use specific signal words to show relationships between periods in history.

  • describe how scientific ideas and concepts grow and develop.

  • describe steps in a scientific experiment and understand why each step is important.

What best explains why King Cheng made everyone in China wear black?
What caused the man to see King Cheng?
Based on what you have learned in this text, what is the most likely reason that the Great Wall of China was created?

Why has the author likely included this line of dialogue:


I must stop these barbarians.”

  • Read the two sentences in the passage. Which question could be answered after reading them?




  • How are today’s _____ (animals/technology/ scientists/ landforms…) different from the ______ (ones of the past)?




  • What best explains why ______wants to _________ (take a specific action)?




  • Which is the most likely reason that _________?




  • Which word best describes _______?




  • _______ started their journey on ________ because _______?




  • The ________invented _______due to ____________?




  • What did ________ do in the year____?




  • What happened during ________’s trip that helped the next trip to happen?




  • 3.4

  • Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.



Students will figure out the meaning of a word by seeing how it is used in a sentence or paragraph. They will understand that some words are special when used in texts related to certain subjects (domain-specific words).
Students might…

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of academic vocabulary.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of domain-specific vocabulary.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of figurative phrases and language.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of dialogue.

  • use context clues to determine the meaning of words with prefixes and suffixes.



What clues in the passage can help you figure out what the word “unwieldy” means?
Read this sentence from the text: “In the North the fierce Mongol horseman raided Chinese villages.” The author uses the word “fierce” to show_____?
What clues in the passage can help you to figure out the meaning of the word “raided”?



  • Read this sentence from the passage... Which words tell what “________” means?




  • Read the following sentence from the first paragraph: “______.” The author uses the word “ _____” to show ______?




  • What is the meaning of “______”as it is used in this passage? Use clues in the first paragraph to find the meaning of this word.




  • Read the sentence from the article. “___” (Paragraph 3). How does Paragraph 7 support this sentence?




  • Paragraph _ of the passage states, “___.” What does the word _____ mean? Support your response with two details from the passage.




  • Three clues from the passage can help you figure out the meaning of ____________. The first two clues are listed below. Write the third clue in the “Clues” column and fill in the blank under the “What the Words Mean” heading.




  • Which word from the passage best tells what the word ____ means? Look at the answer you chose above. Explain how the clue words in the passage helped you figure out the meaning of _____.




  • Choose another word or a group of words in the passage that helps you figure out the meaning of ______. Discuss how they help you figure out the meaning of “____.”

  • 3.5 

  • Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

Students will use text features to locate important facts and details as they read and to search for information. They will know what type of text feature will allow them to best find a piece of information and will be able to find information quickly.
Students might…

  • look at links and their purposes to help inform the reader.

  • identify different text features and understand their purposes.

  • identify and use web-based features.

  • use the text features in functional texts (how-tos, invitations, webpages, billboards) to locate important information.

  • use features (maps, captions, illustrations, table of contents) to build a deeper understanding of the text.




The author has included Chinese lettering on many pages of this text. What text feature would likely be the most useful for helping you to find out what these letters mean?

  • What is a side bar?




  • What information do you learn from reading the sidebar?




  • If one wanted to find out more information on ________, where could he/she likely look? (Answer choices are text features.)




  • Look for text features that help you find how_______ (something happens). One example is listed in the chart. Write two more examples on the lines. How do these text features help you find details about how________ (something happens)?




  • Where in this passage can you find information about _________? Look at the answer that you chose above. Describe the information in this text feature.




  • Which text feature would be most useful for finding out more about_________?




  • Which subhead would be most helpful for finding facts about________?




  • 3.6

  •  Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

Students will understand that authors think and feel certain ways about the subjects they write about. They will figure out the author’s point of view and decide if their own point of view is similar or different than the author’s.
Students might…

  • think about and describe how the author is thinking and feeling about the subject.

  • describe the point of view that the author has on the topic.

  • compare and contrast their point of view with that of the author’s.




What is the author’s point of view on the Mongols?
In the text, we learn that King Cheng made all the people of China write, use money, and dress the same way. Why has he done this and how do you feel about these actions? Use at two details from the text to explain your answer.




  • Why did the author most likely write this?




  • What is _______’s point of view about ______? Look for opinion words that help you identify ______’s point of view on __________. Two clues are provided for you. Write two more clues in the left column.




  • What is the author’s view on ___________?




  • Look at the answer that you chose above. Explain how the details in the passage helped you figure out the author’s point of view on _________. How do you feel about _______? Is your point of view similar to or different than the author’s point of view?




  • In the first paragraph, ________ says, “___.”
    Do you agree? Compare your opinion with ______’s point of view.




  • Which sentence from the review best describes the author’s point of view on________________?




  • Which statement would the author most likely agree with?




  • Read these sentences from paragraph _ of the article. Which word best describes the author’s point of view on ________?

3.7

 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).




Students will use illustrations as well as the words to gain understanding. They will look at maps, photographs, diagrams, and other illustrations and ask themselves what they are learning from each one as well as how it helps them to understand the main idea of the text.
Students might…

  • look at pictures to further describe details within a text.

  • look at maps or illustrations to understand and describe why and how something happened.

  • look at maps or illustrations to understand and describe when and where something happened.




How does the illustration of King Cheng on page 3 give you information about what will likely happen next?



  • How does the diagram help you understand why the ______ did what they did?




  • How does the time line help you see the key events that are happening in the text across time?




  • According to the map and the text of the passage, what does _______ connect?




  • Based on the map and the text, what does the map show you about ________?




  • Why does the author claim that _______? Use details from both the text and the map to support your answer.







  • 3.8

  •  Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).




Students will understand that all parts of texts are connected. They will notice how sentences and paragraphs are connected and think about relationships such as sequence, cause-effect, and comparison. To do this, they will pay attention to signal words (first/next or as a result/since or alike/both/different/however).
Students might…

  • notice transitions and describe how they help a text flow from beginning to the end.

  • describe details around the structure of the paragraphs.

  • describe details around the way the paragraphs or sentences transition.

Read these two sentences from the text:
China was difficult to manage.”
But the emperor brought order to his unwieldy lands”
What is the relationship between these two sentences?

  • Which sentence tells the first/second/last step in _______?




  • Read these two sentences from paragraph “____”. Which of the following describes the relationship between these two sentences?




  • How are the ideas in this sentence connected?


Answer choices might include connections such as:

the second part of the sentence

  • second part of the sentence gives the cause

of the first part)


  • Paragraph ___ tells that _______. How does paragraph (earlier paragraph) explain why this happened?




  • Which sentence from paragraph ____ tells how the two ________ were alike?




  • Which sentence from the passage best tells a way that the ________were different?




  • What two things are being compared in these sentences?




  • How is _____ like the _____?

3.9

 Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.



Students will be able to compare and contrast main ideas of two texts as well as their key details.
Students might…

  • give evidence to support that key ideas across texts are similar, while also describing the different ways that the texts arrive at this theme.

  • provide evidence to show similarities and difference in tone across two texts.

  • provide evidence around the historical time period or the setting of the texts.

  • provide evidence to show how different genres connect to each other, although, they might tell a different side of a story.




In You Wouldn’t Want to Work on the Great Wall of China, the first page is mainly about the first emperor. What is a key detail found in both texts?
What information do you learn about the emperor from the second text that is not in the first?

  • How are the main ideas of “____” and “____” different?




  • Which of the following is a key detail found in both passages?




  • Which sentence from “_____” best shows how the passages are different?






Updated 2/15/13

The Teachers College Reading and Writing Project



2013

DRAFT




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