Teacher: Ms. Roy Component 1: History Semester



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Social Studies 8

History Course Outline

Course: Social Studies 8

Teacher: Ms. Roy

Component 1: History

Semester: Winter 2016

Email: aroy@torontoprepschool.com

Wiki Site: http://tpssocialstudies8students.wikispaces.com/

Course Text: Bain, Colin M, Canadian History 8. Toronto: Pearson Education Canada, 2008.

Extra help: 9:00- 9:55 A.M. Monday through Friday

Course Description
In Grade 8, students develop an understanding of events in Canada from the 1850s to 1914 and the events leading up to the beginning of the First World War. They investigate the formation of the Canadian nation and its subsequent expansion. They also examine some of the individuals, groups, and movements promoting political and social change in the early twentieth century. In this course, students will learn to think historically. In doing so they will apply the historical thinking concepts to their study of Canadian history, leading to deeper and more meaningful explorations of historical events. To think historically, students need to be able to:


  • Establish historical significance

  • Use primary source evidence

  • Identify continuity and change

  • Analyze cause and consequence

  • Take historical perspectives, and

  • Understand the ethical dimension of historical interpretations.


Overall Curriculum Expectations

History: Grade 8 – Confederation

By the end of Grade 8, students will:




  • Describe the internal and external political factors, key personalities, significant events, and geographical realities that led to the creation of the Dominion of Canada in 1867, and to the growth of Canada as other provinces and territories joined Confederation.




  • Use a variety of resources and tools to gather, process, and communicate information about the needs and challenges that led to the formation and expansion of the Canadian federation.




  • Compare Canada as it was in 1867 to the Canada of today, including political, social, and other issues facing the country in both periods.


History: Grade 8 – The Development of Western Canada

By the end of Grade 8, students will:




  • Describe key characteristics of Canada between 1885 and 1914, including social and economic conditions, the roles and contributions of various people and groups, internal and external pressures for change, and the political responses to these pressures.




  • Use a variety of resources and tools to gather, process, and communicate information about the factors that shaped Canada as it was entering the twentieth century.




  • Compare living and working conditions, technological developments, and social roles near the beginning of the twentieth century with similar aspects of life in present-day Canada.


History: Grade 8 – Canada: A Changing Society

By the end of Grade 8, students will:




  • Describe key characteristics of Canada between 1885 and 1914, including social and economic conditions, the roles and contributions of various people and groups, internal and external pressures for change, and the political responses to these pressures.




  • Use a variety of resources and tools to gather, process, and communicate information about the factors that shaped Canada as it was entering the twentieth century.




  • Compare living and working conditions, technological developments, and social roles near the beginning of the twentieth century with similar aspects of life in present-day Canada.



Units of Study

Confederation
Students examine the major factors and significant events that led to the creation of the Dominion of Canada in 1867 and evaluate the natural and human challenges facing the advocates of union. They investigate regional interests and other factors that led to the growth of Canada, as other provinces and territories joined Confederation. They extend their understanding of national issues by comparing negotiations among regional interests at the time of Confederation with similar debates in Canada today.


20 hours

The Development of Western Canada

Students explore how the new Dominion expanded with the settlement and development of the Canadian west. They examine a range of changes and conflicts, including railroad

construction and issues of resource use, and investigate the roles and reactions of government, First Nation peoples, Métis, and new immigrants. They also explore how the history of the region has influenced Canadian culture.


15 hours

Canada: A Changing Society

Students examine the social and economic factors, technological advances, and individuals and groups that promoted change in Canada between 1885 and the beginning of the First World

War in 1914. They investigate the social and political challenges of increased migration and settlement, rapid industrialization, Canada’s changing role in the British Empire, and Canadian-

American relations. Students develop skills of historical analysis by making comparisons and connections between conditions near the beginning of the twentieth century and aspects of life in present-day Canada.




20 hours




55 hours



Assessment and Evaluation

This Course is primarily assignment based-80% Course work (assignments, essays, quizzes, tests, etc.) and 20% CCT/Final Exam.



Class Expectations


  • Attend all classes and be on time.

  • Come to class prepared. It is your responsibility to always have your laptop (with the required software) textbook, pens, pencil, etc.

  • Be involved and participate in class discussions and activities.

  • Proper behavior in the classroom is mandatory. Respect the teachers, your peers, 
yourself and the classroom.

  • If you have a question all you have to do is raise your hand.

  • Always complete your homework. Additional homework support is available in Homework Club and/or Saturday Club.

  • Be responsible and catch up on missed work (due to absences) before returning to class. Use the class wiki to help you do this. .

  • Cell phones are not permitted in the classroom. Please put your phone in your bag for the duration of the class.

  • The only food or liquid permitted in the class is bottled water, which must be placed either in your bag or on the ground next to you (not on the desk).

ACADEMIC DUE DATE POLICY

All assignments and projects will have a due date.

The due date is the beginning of the period for that given class. For example if a project is due for the period one class it must be submitted at 10:00 AM, if it is due for the period four class on a Wednesday, then it is due at 2:49 PM.

The due date represents the date in which the assignment/project is due. Students should submit the assignment/project to their subject teacher on the due date. If a student does not submit the task on the due date the subject teacher will contact the parents/guardian to notify them of the outstanding work that day. The subject teacher will not provide support after the due date has passed.

Late marks will be deducted on late assignments. This strategy is in keeping with the Ministry’s policy document “Growing Success”. Late projects/assignments will be assessed at a reduction of 5% per day for the first two days and 10% per day after that to a maximum of 50%. Each project will be assessed for the 100% of its original value, and late marks will be clearly stated on the final evaluation. After 6 school days, a student will receive a zero. Students are strongly encouraged to still hand in late projects for assessment and written feedback. A Saturday Club inclusion will be made within the 6 days.

Projects/assignments turned into the teacher after they have been marked and returned to students, will not be awarded a grade if the project/assignment is one the teacher believes can be copied from peers (at teacher’s discretion), however, written feedback on the assignment will be given. (For example: journals, reflection pieces, etc.)



Extension Request Form

There is a procedure for students to seek relief from a due date and extend a deadline without academic penalty. In extraordinary circumstances, extensions may be granted, if an Extension Request Form is filled out by the student and signed by a parent and approved by the teacher at least one day before the due date. It is up to the discretion of the teacher and the school administration whether or not to accept the Extension Request. A student may request an extension to the maximum of 2 times in each course and for no more than 3 days. After the allotted time has passed and the assignment has not been submitted then late marks will be assigned. Our policy recognizes that extenuating circumstances may legitimately prevent a student from meeting a due date. The Extension Request Form may be garnered from the principal or vice-principal.



Illness/Doctor’s Notes

If a student is absent on the due date, a doctor’s note (or parental note in case of a family emergency) must be provided to the subject teacher in order for the student to submit the assignment. The assignment must be submitted upon the first day the student returns.



Parental Communication

Parents will be contacted if the assignment/project is not submitted on the due date.



Email receipt of Assignments

Since weekend days will be included in the late policy, the submitted time and date will be based on the time that the assignment arrives in the teacher’s email in-box.


Turnitin Policy
As per the student handbook and Turnitin manual, all work must be submitted through Turnitin at the teacher’s request. Failure to do so will be considered incomplete or late work. Work to be submitted through Turnitin may be written, oral presentations, multimedia presentations etc.
Students will be given a Toronto Prep School email address to access Turnitin. Students must use this email address to submit their work.


The school’s plagiarism policy is posted in the student handbook as well the Turnitin manual with FAQs and examples of proper referencing styles. Please speak with your teacher should you have questions about what constitutes plagiarism and how to use turnitin.


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