Teacher Candidate: Morgan Pellerin Date: November 1, 2010 Lesson Plan One Outline Subject: U. S. History and Government Grade Level: 11



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Teacher Candidate: Morgan Pellerin Date: November 1, 2010

Lesson Plan One Outline

Subject: U.S. History and Government

Grade Level: 11th Grade

Unit Title: The American Revolution

Essential Question: How do world events impact our lives?


Lesson

Title/Number

Lesson One

Lesson Question(s)

Who are the Enlightenment Thinkers and why are they important?
How did British political traditions impact the development of American political traditions?

State Standards and

Performance Indicators

Standard 1: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
Performance Indicator: Students understand the interrelationships between world events and developments in New York State and the United States (e.g., causes for immigration, economic opportunities, human rights abuses, and tyranny versus freedom).


Lesson Objectives

(Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Acceptable Evidence

  1. Students will be able to compare and contrast the ideas of Locke, Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau.

  2. Students will be able to explain how British political traditions impacted the development of American political traditions.

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  1. Students will perform a skit on a particular philosopher or British political tradition demonstrating their knowledge of the content.

  2. Students will complete a worksheet matching each philosopher or political tradition to their corresponding definition.




Bell Ringer and

Prior Knowledge

Prior Knowledge:

American political traditions were not developed in a vacuum. The principles of American government were founded upon a combination of principles from Enlightenment thinkers like Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Montesquieu, as well as British political traditions including habeas corpus, and a bicameral, two-house legislature.


Both Enlightenment Thinkers and British political traditions have major contributions to American government. Why is this important? Because ideas from unalienable rights, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, civil liberties, habeas corpus, and a two house legislature were not original American ideas. Rather, it was the first time all of these ideas were put together to form the foundation of a nation.
Bell ringer:

Students will record what rights they feel encapsulate American values.



Procedure – teacher input, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

*Accommodations for learning modalities are required.

1. Teacher will introduce bell ringer and ask students to provide their answers. Teacher will write down on the board the rights students come up with for the bell ringer.
2. Teacher will use direct instruction to review the impact of Enlightenment Philosophers Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Voltaire, and their respective government theories on the development of American Rights, as well as British Political Traditions. PowerPoint will be utilized for this direct instruction.
3. Teacher will split students into groups using famous pairs (or trios depending on group size). Teacher will assign each group a philosopher or British political tradition.
4. Once in groups, teacher will give students directions to create a skit depicting their assigned philosopher or British political tradition for an assigned period of time.

Teacher will bring the group back together and ask each group to perform their skit.


5. Once all are completed, teacher will ask students to repeat what each philosopher or British political tradition means.
6. Teacher will remind students that these ideas will show up as we go further in the foundations of American Government

Checks for Understanding –

Directions, procedures, routines, and content (formative)

Teacher will ask students to repeat what each philosopher or British political tradition stood for during direct instruction.
Teacher will ask students to repeat directions for skit.
Teacher will ask students to repeat what each philosopher and political tradition stood for at the end of the lesson.

Assessment – type and purpose

Skit on Enlightenment Philosopher (Formative).

End of Unit Exam (Summative).



Closure

Students will be able to identify what each Enlightenment philosopher and British political tradition stands for, and will be able to examine how these influenced the writing of American political documents in the future.

Accommodations

If a person cannot physically participate in the skit, they will be expected to be the “director” of their group, and help facilitate how the skit will play out.

Materials

Textbook used in the class
Power Point presentation on Enlightenment Philosophers and British Political Traditions (Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Montesquieu, as well as British political traditions including habeas corpus, and a bicameral, two house legislature.)
Computer/Projector
Thumb Drive
Famous Trio Cards


Duration

One forty-minute class period.


Teacher Candidate: Morgan Pellerin Date: November 1, 2010

Lesson Plan One Outline

Subject: U.S. History and Government

Grade Level: 11th Grade

Unit Title: The American Revolution

Essential Question: How do world events impact our lives?


Lesson

Title/Number

Lesson Two

Lesson Question(s)

What did the end of Salutary Neglect in the colonies mean for colonists and how did they react?
How did the end of Salutary Neglect impact colonial merchants?

State Standards and

Performance Indicators

Standard 1: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
Performance Indicator: Students understand the interrelationships between world events and developments in New York State and the United States (e.g., causes for immigration, economic opportunities, human rights abuses, and tyranny versus freedom).


Lesson Objectives

(Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Acceptable Evidence

  1. Students will be able to identify the series of acts that were passed in the British Parliament after the French and Indian War that were passed as a way to repay the war debt the colonies accrued.

  2. Students will be able to then use this information and apply it to how colonial merchants reacted when being forced to deal only with Britain.

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  1. Students will complete a worksheet matching the appropriate act to what it did to the colonists.

  2. Students will write a paragraph detailing how the colonists reacted as a result of these acts.




Bell Ringer and

Prior Knowledge

Prior Knowledge:

After the French and Indian War, the British stopped their policy of Salutary Neglect with the colonies, and forced the colonists to pay taxes and trade solely with Britain to repay the way debt accrued during the war.


Britain saw these two ways of raising revenue as essential because the war was fought in a large part to protect the colonies, so they should have a hand in helping to pay back the debt. Why is this important? Because American colonists did not see the event the same way as the British. They saw it as an attack on their freedoms, and an oppressive measure by Great Britain.
Bell ringer:

Explain what you would do if you came home from school, your parents told you that you were grounded, that you could only have certain friends, and that your allowance was only going to be $1 per week.



Procedure – teacher input, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

*Accommodations for learning modalities are required.

1. Teacher will introduce bell ringer and ask students to provide their answers. Teacher will use student responses to bell ringer and relate them to Britain holding the colonists accountable after the French and Indian War, taking away many of their freedoms.
2. Teacher will use direct instruction to define the British Acts passed after the French and Indian War including the Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, Sugar Act, Declaratory Act, Townshend Act, Interolerable (Coercive) Acts.
3. Teacher will utilize a power point presentation to go into depth on how each of these acts impacted the colonies.
4. Teacher will have students consider the impact these acts had on colonial merchants being told who they can trade with. Teacher will ask students to write a paragraph detailing how they would react as colonialists to the British acts being passed. Teacher will reiterate how this is similar to relationship of them to their parents when they are grounded.
5. Teacher will utilize famous pairs to split students into groups. Once in groups, teacher will ask students to compare their paragraphs and talk about how they would have reacted.
5. After a few minutes, teacher will ask each group to share what they discussed with their partner (Think, Pair, Share).
6. Teacher will hand out a matching worksheet that has each British Act and what it did to the colonists for homework.

Checks for Understanding –

Directions, procedures, routines, and content (formative)

Teacher will ask students what each act did during direct instruction, and will do so repeatedly.
Teacher will ask students to repeat directions for writing their paragraph.
Teacher will ask students to repeat what each British act stood for at the end of the lesson.

Assessment – type and purpose

Paragraph on impacts of British Acts on Colonists (Formative/Scaffolding).

Matching Worksheet (Formative)



End of Unit Exam (Summative).

Closure

Students will be able to identify how the British Acts passed after the French and Indian War impacted the colonies through writing a paragraph, completing a worksheet, and repetition throughout the class period.

Accommodations




Materials

Textbook used in the class
Power Point presentation on Proclamation of 1763, Stamp Act, Sugar Act, Declaratory Act, Townshend Act, Interolerable (Coercive) Acts.
Computer/Projector
Thumb Drive
Famous Pairs Cards


Duration

One forty minute class period.


Teacher Candidate: Morgan Pellerin Date: November 1, 2010

Lesson Plan One Outline

Subject: U.S. History and Government

Grade Level: 11th Grade

Unit Title: The American Revolution

Essential Question: How do world events impact our lives?


Lesson

Title/Number

Lesson Three

Lesson Question(s)

What did the end of Salutary Neglect in the colonies mean for colonists and how did they react?
What could the British have done differently to stop the American colonists from revolting?

State Standards and

Performance Indicators

Standard 1: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
Performance Indicator: Students understand the interrelationships between world events and developments in New York State and the United States (e.g., causes for immigration, economic opportunities, human rights abuses, and tyranny versus freedom).


Lesson Objectives

(Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Acceptable Evidence

  1. Students will be able to judge the outcome Britain’s ending of its policy of Salutary Neglect with the American colonies, which had allowed the colonies a great deal of freedom until the end of the French and Indian War in 1763.

  2. Students will be able to recommend to the British what they could have done differently to stave off a revolution.

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  1. Students will perform a debate on what factors led to the American Revolution and what the British could have done differently to stop it from starting.

Bell Ringer and

Prior Knowledge

Prior Knowledge:

Coming into this lesson, students will already have an understanding of what factors led to the American Revolution. Now they will be asked to use this knowledge and apply it to what the British could have done differently to stop the Revolution from starting in the first place


Bell ringer:

Explain how you would feel if every day you came to school, you had to give your teachers a dollar, then when you go home, I could knock on your door and you’d have to let me in for the night and give me a meal. How would this make you feel? How does this apply to the time leading up to the American Revolution in America?



Procedure – teacher input, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

*Accommodations for learning modalities are required.

1. Teacher will introduce bell ringer and ask students to provide their answers. Teacher will use student responses to bell ringer and relate them to Britain holding the colonists accountable after the French and Indian War, taking away many of their freedoms.
2. Teacher will review paragraphs written in the prior day’s lesson where students had to consider the impact the actions of Britain following the French and Indian War had on colonial merchants being told who they can trade with.
3. Teacher will reiterate how all of these factors (the series of British Acts forced upon the American colonies) led to a great deal of hostility in the colonies towards Britain.
4. Teacher will divide the class into three groups utilizing index cards with an associated color or picture for each group.
5. Teacher will assign each group a role as either 1) American colonists that want to go to war against Britain, 2) American colonists that want to be loyal to Britain, 3) British Parliament.
6. Teacher will explain that each group has to persuade the others that their cause is correct way for history to unfold. Each group will be granted 10 minutes to figure out their opening argument, and 3 questions to ask the other groups, and a closing argument. The groups will be able to utilize their course materials for research, as well as a degree of their own writing of history to come up with ways that may be different from what actually happened, but present a viable solution to the problems at that time.
7. Teacher will facilitate the debate, giving each group 1 minute for an opening argument, 1 minute for each of their questions, and 1 minute for their closing argument.
8. Teacher will use student responses to facilitate a closing discussion on what events led to the American Revolution and how the history actually played out.
9. Teacher will explain that students are to use the arguments presented in the debate to write a paragraph about what the British could have done differently to stave off revolution with the colonies.
10. Teacher will remind students that their will be a small quiz tomorrow on the factors that led to the American Revolution that we have been covering this week, but their will be an in-class review before the quiz.

Checks for Understanding –

Directions, procedures, routines, and content (formative)

Teacher will ask students for their responses on their paragraphs from yesterday.
Teacher will ask students to repeat the directions for the debate.
Teacher will ask students to repeat what the need for the debate and how long they have for it.
Teacher will ask students to repeat directions for writing their paragraph.
Teacher will ask students to explain what the quiz will be on tomorrow and if we have a review for it.

Assessment – type and purpose

Paragraph on what British could have done differently (Formative/Scaffolding).

Debate (Formative)

End of Unit Exam (Summative).


Closure

Students will be able to apply the information they learned in yesterday’s class to a debate over what the British could have done differently to stave off revolution, then formulate this in a paragraph.

Accommodations




Materials

Textbook used in the class.
Stopwatch.
Index Cards.


Duration

One forty-minute class period.


Teacher Candidate: Morgan Pellerin Date: November 1, 2010

Lesson Plan One Outline

Subject: U.S. History and Government

Grade Level: 11th Grade

Unit Title: The American Revolution

Essential Question: How do world events impact our lives?


Lesson

Title/Number

Lesson Four

Lesson Question(s)

What factors led to the American Revolution?


State Standards and

Performance Indicators

Standard 1: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
Performance Indicator: Students understand the interrelationships between world events and developments in New York State and the United States (e.g., causes for immigration, economic opportunities, human rights abuses, and tyranny versus freedom).


Lesson Objectives

(Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Acceptable Evidence

1. Students will be able to analyze how the American Revolution came about as a result of the casual relationships with the factors preceding it.
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  1. Students will complete a quiz with selected response and short answer questions.

Bell Ringer and

Prior Knowledge

Prior Knowledge:

Coming into this lesson, students will already have an understanding of what factors led to the American Revolution. They will have conducted a debate about the different points of view in the colonies. Now they will be asked to use this knowledge and apply it to a quiz with selected response and short answer questions.


Bell ringer:

Name 3 factors that led to the American Revolution.



Procedure – teacher input, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

*Accommodations for learning modalities are required.

1. Teacher will introduce bell ringer and ask students to provide their answers. Teacher will use student responses to bell ringer and use them to review for the quiz.
2. Teacher will pair students together using famous pairs and have each pair create a mind map detailing what factors led to the American Revolution.
3. Teacher will go over the mind maps each group made, and will fill in the gaps that need to be filled.
4. Teacher will hand out quiz on factors that led to the American Revolution with both selected response questions and short answer. Questions will deal with factors that led to the American Revolution including Enlightenment Thinkers, British political traditions, and British policies after the French and Indian War.
5. Teacher will collect quizzes when students are done.
6. Teacher will assign students to write a paragraph about whether or not they would have supported the American Revolution and why or why not.



Checks for Understanding –

Directions, procedures, routines, and content (formative)

Teacher will make sure bell ringer answers are correct in the factors that led to the American Revolution.
Teacher will ask students to repeat directions for mind map.
Teacher will ask if there are any questions before the quiz.
Teacher will ask students to repeat directions for writing their paragraph.


Assessment – type and purpose

Mind Map (Formative)

Paragraph on what side students would have agreed with (Formative/Scaffolding).

Quiz (Summative)

End of Unit Exam (Summative).



Closure

Students will be able to apply the information they learned in previous classes in a quiz on the factors that led to the American Revolution, and then formulate what their opinion would be in a paragraph.

Accommodations




Materials

Textbook used in the class.
Stopwatch.
Index Cards.


Duration

One forty-minute class period.


Teacher Candidate: Morgan Pellerin Date: November 1, 2010

Lesson Plan One Outline

Subject: U.S. History and Government

Grade Level: 11th Grade

Unit Title: The American Revolution

Essential Question: How do world events impact our lives?


Lesson

Title/Number

Lesson Five

Lesson Question(s)

How did the Enlightenment philosophers influence the writing of the Declaration of Independence?
What were the different viewpoints of colonists at the outbreak of the Revolution and how were they persuaded to support the Revolution?


State Standards and

Performance Indicators

Standard 1: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
Performance Indicator: Students understand the interrelationships between world events and developments in New York State and the United States (e.g., causes for immigration, economic opportunities, human rights abuses, and tyranny versus freedom).


Lesson Objectives

(Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Acceptable Evidence

  1. Students will be able to identify the key concepts of the Declaration of Independence and how the Enlightenment Philosophers impacted the writers of the Declaration.

  2. Students will be able to demonstrate that there were several points of view in the colonies, and how Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense,” convinced many colonists to become patriots.

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  1. Students will read excerpts from the Declaration of Independence and discuss how the language was influenced by Enlightenment philosophers.

  2. Students will use this information and fill out a worksheet matching portions of the Declaration of Independence to the appropriate philosopher’s ideas.

  3. Students will construct a Venn Diagram detailing what the viewpoints of colonists were during the Revolution.

Bell Ringer and

Prior Knowledge

Prior Knowledge:

Going into this lesson, students should have an understanding of what factors led to the American Revolution in the previous classes for the unit. They will now see how events unfolded and these events that they have learned about will boil over into the revolution.


Bell ringer:

Pick one of the following Enlightenment philosophers and explain their ideas for government (Locke, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau).



Procedure – teacher input, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

*Accommodations for learning modalities are required.

1. Teacher will introduce bell ringer and ask students to provide their answers. Teacher will use student responses to bell ringer and use them to re-introduce the ideas of the Enlightenment philosophers
2. Teacher will use example of telephone development to explain how the Enlightenment philosophers impacted the Declaration of Independence. Will ask students how many have a cell phone. Will ask students to think if the invent0r of the cell phone started from scratch? Teacher will explain how landline telephone technology and airwave technology were put together to make a cell phone. Thus, the inventor of the cell phone did not start from scratch. Teacher will use this example to illustrate that writers of the Declaration of Independence did not start from scratch either. Used the ideas of the Enlightenment philosophers to help formulate the Declaration.
3. Teacher will have students listen to the Declaration of Independence being read aloud via computer. They will also be asked to follow along in their textbooks.


  1. Teacher will explain the directions or next task. Teacher will tell students that they will be split into groups and given a particular section of the Declaration of Independence to read. Then they will have to examine their excerpt and see which Enlightenment Philosopher it applies to. Once they have done this they will check in with the teacher to make sure the selected the correct philosopher. Then, as a group, they will be expected to write a paragraph detailing how their philosopher impacted the writing of the Declaration of Independence. Teacher will ask 3 students to repeat the directions.




  1. Teacher will split students into groups utilizing famous trios index cards.




  1. Teacher will monitor student progress and check in with groups to make sure they selected the correct Enlightenment philosopher before moving on to writing their paragraph.




  1. Teacher will ask students to share their responses with the class.




  1. Teacher will move to next topic and ask students to think about their favorite sports team. Then ask them to think of the point of view of who likes the team they just played. Teacher will reiterate how this same sentiment was true in the colonies at the time of revolution.




  1. Teacher will read an excerpt from Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense.” Once completed, teacher will ask to think of Thomas Paine as a New York Mets fan, trying to convert Yankee fans to the Mets. Teacher will reiterate that they have learned there were many sides to the Revolution argument.




  1. As a class, Teacher will have students participate in creating a group Venn Diagram of the different viewpoints in the colonies at the time of the Revolution.




Checks for Understanding –

Directions, procedures, routines, and content (formative)

Teacher will make sure bell ringer answers are correct in relation to the Enlightenment philosophers.
Teacher will ask students to repeat directions Enlightenment Philosopher/Declaration of Independence paragraph exercise.
Teacher will ask particular students about what each Enlightenment philosopher stood for.
Teacher will ask students about why a particular group might have held a certain viewpoint.


Assessment – type and purpose

Bell ringer (Formative)

Paragraph on how Enlightenment philosopher impacted the Declaration of Independence (Formative/Scaffolding).

Venn Diagram (Formative)

End of Unit Exam (Summative).



Closure

Students will be able to apply the information that they have learned about Enlightenment Philosophers and evaluate how they impacted the writing of the Declaration of Independence.
Students will be able to apply the information they have learned about the multiple viewpoints in the colonies at the time of Revolution and construct a Venn Diagram detailing the differences in viewpoints.

Accommodations




Materials

Textbook used in the class.
Materials for Venn Diagram.
Declaration of Independence (Possibly in Textbook)
Index Cards.


Duration

One to two forty minute class period.


Teacher Candidate: Morgan Pellerin Date: November 1, 2010

Lesson Plan One Outline

Subject: U.S. History and Government

Grade Level: 11th Grade

Unit Title: The American Revolution

Essential Question: How do world events impact our lives?


Lesson

Title/Number

Lesson Six

Lesson Question(s)

What were the key military engagements in the American Revolution?
What difficulties did Britain face in fighting an enemy over 3000 miles away?


State Standards and

Performance Indicators

Standard 1: Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.
Performance Indicator: Students understand the interrelationships between world events and developments in New York State and the United States (e.g., causes for immigration, economic opportunities, human rights abuses, and tyranny versus freedom).


Lesson Objectives

(Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Acceptable Evidence

  1. Students will be able to identify the key points of military action during the American Revolution.

  2. Students will be able to point out the difficulties of Britain governing and fighting an enemy 3000 miles away.

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  1. Students will create a map with important military engagements.

  2. Students will write a paragraph detailing the difficulties of Britain fighting a war over 3000 miles away.

Bell Ringer and

Prior Knowledge

Prior Knowledge:

Going into this lesson, students will have an understanding of what factors led to the American Revolution, and how relations were between the American colonies and Britain.


Bell ringer:

What were two of the several causes of the American Revolution? Why are these important?



Procedure – teacher input, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, and/or activities

*Accommodations for learning modalities are required.

1. Teacher will introduce bell ringer and ask students to provide their answers. Teacher will use student responses to bell ringer and use them to prompt students to begin talking about the American Revolution.
2. Teacher will use example of current War in Iraq to illustrate how each war usually has some key turning points that are crucial to understanding the war.
3. Teacher will utilize direct instruction to teach students the important points of the war including Lexington and Concord, the Battle of Ticonderoga and the Battle of Bunker Hill, the writing of the Declaration of Independence, the Battle of Trenton, the Battle of Saratoga, and the Battle of Yorktown.
4. Teacher will provide students with a blank piece of paper, and markers or crayons, to create their own map of the important events in the American Revolution. Students will be required to name the event, put the date, and why it was important. Teacher will provide a guide, with a map of the colonies on the power point screen for students to get a sense of what is required. Students will be permitted to work in groups of three for this task, and will be separated using famous trios.
5. Once students have completed the task, teacher will ask each group to share what they put on their maps.
6. Teacher will now have a brief discussion with what factors led to difficulties for Britain fighting the Americans.
7. Once this discussion is complete students will be assigned to write a paragraph about what factors led to difficulties with Britain fighting the American Revolution.

Checks for Understanding –

Directions, procedures, routines, and content (formative)

Teacher will make sure bell ringer answers are correct in relation to the causes for the American Revolution.
Teacher will ask students to repeat why a particular event in the American Revolution was important.
Teacher will ask students to repeat the directions for the Map of key events task.
Teacher will ask students to repeat the directions for the paragraph assignment.


Assessment – type and purpose

Bell ringer (Formative)

Paragraph on how English had Difficulties fighting the Americans (Formative/Scaffolding).

Map of Important Events during the Revolution (Formative)

End of Unit Exam (Summative).



Closure

Students will be able to apply the knowledge they have learned about the key events during the American Revolution and make their own map of key events.

Accommodations




Materials

Textbook used in the class.
Materials for making a map (Paper and crayons/markers).
Power Point for Direct Instruction on Key Events during the American Revolution.
Thumb Drive
Computer.
Index Cards.


Duration

One forty-minute class period.


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