Table of Contents: Why Make Your Campus Tobacco Free



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Colleges/Universities Tobacco Free Campus

Resource Action Guide




Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH)

Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program
Table of Contents:
1. Why Make Your Campus Tobacco Free…………………………………………. 3

A. Negative Effects of Tobacco Use on Students……...........3

B. Benefits to the University/College……………………….3

C. You’re in Good Company………………………………..3


2. How To Make Your Campus Tobacco Free: Initial Planning………………….. 4

  1. Establish a Committee or Workgroup..………………… 4

  2. Conduct an Assessment…………….……...…………… 4

  3. Coalition Building……………………………..……….. 5



3. How To Make Your Campus Tobacco Free: Pre-Implementation.…………….. 6

  1. Policy Development…………………………………….. 6

  2. Select Implementation Strategies………………….……. 7

  3. Cessation Resources…………………………………….. 8


4. How To Make Your Campus Tobacco Free: Implementation & Evaluation…....9

A. Implementation…………………………………………. 9

B. Spread the Word…………………………………………9

C. Evaluation………………..……………...................…….9




1. Why Make Your Campus Tobacco Free
A. Negative Effects of Tobacco Use on Students

1) Health Effects:

The negative health effects of tobacco use are widely known – but did you know that college smokers have a higher incidence of asthma, respiratory infections and bacterial meningitis, especially among freshman living in dorms? Further, environmental exposure to tobacco smoke causes 3,000 deaths per year and cigarette smoking is strongly associated with mental health problems and suicidal tendencies.

2) Other High Risk Behavior: College students who smoke are more likely to engage in other high risk behavior such as excessive drinking and illicit drug use.

3) Lower Grades: Smokers have lower GPAs than nonsmokers!



Details of health effects and other high risk behaviors are located at: http://www.ttac.org/services/college/facts/negative-effects.html


B. Benefits to the University/College

Having a tobacco-free campus will not only reduce the health effects of second-hand smoke (please visit our website http://www.makesmokinghistory.org/ to get more information on the health effects of second hand smoke) but can also help colleges/universities in:




  • Recruiting new students

  • Saving money on facilities and maintenance

  • Advancing sustainability

  • Reducing risk of fires

  • Eliminating the risk of ADA accessibility challenges related to secondhand smoke

  • Avoiding potential legal liability from students, employees, and visitors exposure to secondhand smoke


C. You’re in Good Company!
Many colleges/universities all over the country have already gone tobacco free. Click on the link below for a complete list.


  • http://www.lung.org/stop-smoking/tobacco-control-advocacy/reports-resources/tobacco-policy-trend-reports/college-report.pdf



Before continuing it may be important to first look at a few case studies of colleges/universities that have already begun to expand their tobacco policies on campus and to look at their strategies for going so.


  • http://www.ttac.org/services/college/campus/index.html#model



  • http://www.tobaccofreeu.org/pdf/ManualGASO.pdf




2. How To Make Your Campus Tobacco Free : Initial Planning

A. Establish a Committee or Workgroup


  1. Include representation from multiple areas including Senior Management, Administration, facilities, student services, human resources, medical staff, communications/community relations, and tobacco users



  2. Schedule regular meetings to develop an implementation plan with a specific date to be completely tobacco-free



  3. Committee should provide monthly/quarterly reports to senior management along with an internal email/newsletter update



B. Conduct an assessment
Determine what the need of the campus is by evaluating:
1) How much smoking is actually being done on campus


  1. Student’s attitudes, beliefs and perceptions about smoking on campus. Focusing on behavior and perception will increase the chances of helping students quit when they are ready.




  1. What is currently being done regarding this issue on campus?




    1. Click below for an example of questions and checklist to consider for this type of assessment. http://www.tobaccofreeu.org/pdf/ManualGASO.pdf




  1. Which students on campus are more at risk

    1. It is important to note that several groups may stand out on campus as high risk for tobacco-use onset or increasing rates of use once they come to campus. Click below for a list of those groups and supporting research. http://www.tobaccofreeu.org/pdf/ManualGASO.pdf



For further resources on how to begin and conduct this assessment go here:



  • http://www.ttac.org/services/college/action/action.html



C. Coalition Building


  • Efforts put into becoming a tobacco free campus will have more of an impact when supported by the whole campus and its key stakeholders. Make sure these supporters represent all aspects of campus, to ensure a more comprehensive approach.

  • Click below for detail information on building a coalition including a list of possible organizations to include as partners. http://www.tobaccofreeu.org/policy/task_force.asp




  • For further resources on this topic go to this link: http://www.ttac.org/services/college/action/action.html

3. How To Make Your Campus Tobacco Free : Pre - Implementation

Once the coalition has been finalized, assessment results have been discussed, campus goals and objectives have been identified, and deadlines have been determined, it will be important for teams to begin to discuss in detail the issues below:


  1. Policy Development

  2. Implementation Strategies

  3. Cessation Programs on Campus

  4. Evaluation Strategies

Please note that although action steps are in order in practice, steps may occur simultaneously or at different sequence.


A. Policy Development



    1. Assessment: Assess current tobacco/smoking policies and create a tobacco-free policy with clearly defined goals and dates for implementation that will enable the smooth transition



    2. Use Positive Language: Whether you are amending a current policy or creating a new one, keep language focused on increasing student access, improving student health, and preventing exposure to secondhand smoke. Positive policy language will increase the success of the implementation and compliance of this policy.



    3. An Eye to Evaluation: It’s also important to keep in mind the evaluation of the policy while developing it so that improvements can be made for a more successful approach. See evaluation section on this document for more information.




    1. Look at Recommended Policies: The American College Health Association (ACHA) recommends that colleges/universities take the following actions within their policy development to ensure a comprehensive effort to promote tobacco free environments on their campus:



      1. Prohibit smoking within all university-affiliated buildings including: residence halls, administrative facilities, classrooms, fraternities and sororities, all university-sponsored events – both indoor and outdoor, and within 20 feet of the entrance of campus.



      2. Prohibit the sale of tobacco products on campus.



      3. Prohibit the free distribution of tobacco products on campus, including fraternities and sororities.



      4. Prohibit tobacco advertisements in college-run publications.



      5. Provide free, accessible tobacco treatment on campus—and advertise it. Encourage students who smoke to get help quitting, and make it easy for them to access free services.



      6. Prohibit campus organizations from accepting money from tobacco companies.



      7. Prohibit the university from holding stock in or accepting donations from the tobacco industry. In addition, colleges and universities should enact policies prohibiting the acceptance of any donations or grants from the tobacco industry; whether the money is intended for research, funding, or other university-sponsored programs.

Looking at examples of policies could help in creating this new policy. Click below for several examples of campus tobacco policies.



  • http://www.ttac.org/services/college/campus/index.html




5) Obtain Input and Finalize:

      1. Review draft policy with administration, legal counsel, human resources, union reps, and other key stakeholders



      2. Present action plan to board for input and approval



      3. Make necessary changes to policy



B. Select Implementation Strategies



  1. Utilize Initial Planning to Determine Strategy: The strategies used to implement and communicate the new policy will greatly depend on the goals and objectives of the campus as well as each different component and population on your campus. For example, some campus groups may have high rates of smoking such as sororities, fraternities and arts clubs.



  2. Sample Strategies to Consider:

    • Develop internal/external communications plan, signage, and collateral

    • Inform staff of policy and implementation date and timeline

      • Draft FAQs

      • Explain reasons for going tobacco-free and the effects on staff

      • Address possible concerns of staff

    • Reach out to the community with preliminary policy plans and keep media informed as benchmarks are met



  3. Look to Resources: A variety of information including sample strategies for colleges/universities is provided below. Again take a look at the model colleges/universities for even further specific strategies and how each worked.

    • http://www.ttac.org/services/college/model/index.html

    • http://www.tobaccofreeu.org/programming/marketing.asp

    • Norms social marketing has been a popular and effective way to approach communication strategies among students. Click below to learn more about norms social marketing and it can be used to effectively target second hand smoke on campus: www.socialnorm.org






C. Cessation Resources

It is highly important to offer information about quitting or appropriate referrals before and after the policy takes effect. Cessation strategies that are carefully planned out and implemented properly will yield many students and staff to quit. The strategies should include the availability of resources for those interested in being helped.

1. Decide What Will be Provided to Students and Staff


  • Pharmaceutical cessation aids to students and staff

  • Counseling services

2. Develop a program that will:



  • Provide information on self-help cessation

  • Inform staff, students and community members about community-based cessation programs



3. Utilize Resources

  • To order supplies to add to your campus cessation efforts please visit:

http://www.maclearinghouse.com/category/TOB.html

  • Use your evaluation of present programs on campus to modify and improve them or visit our http://www.makesmokinghistory.org/ website for more information about helping students quit.



4. How To Make Your Campus Tobacco Free: Implementation & Evaluation
A. Implementation

1. Train Staff and Create Support Systems



    • Train staff to address the needs of students and visitors dependent on tobacco products

    • Policy enforcement tactics and procedures

    • Referrals to counseling or cessation programs

2. Implement programs to aid students and visitors with cessation

3. Establish enforcement policies


B. Spread the Word

1. Walk through the campus and decide where signs will be placed



  • Remove ash receptacles and update signage on campus

2. Print brochures, table tents, and posters detailing the tobacco-free policy
and key changes

3. Print materials detailing cessation resources available to students and staff

4. Publically celebrate implementation day with community members and local media
C. Evaluation

1. Why Evaluate?



  • Without an evaluation step in the tobacco-free transition, all efforts could be incomplete. Evaluation is not just to show the administration that they spent their money wisely, but rather to improve and expand on these efforts for better positive results.

2. How to Evaluate

  • Talk with staff and students to gain feedback about the policy

  • Schedule ongoing meetings to assess the effectiveness of the policy

  • Make necessary changes to policy

  • Use the links below for strategies and surveys for evaluating the policy



http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/secondhand_smoke/evaluation_toolkit/index.htm


http://www.tobaccofreeu.org/programming/program_evaluation.asp





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