Table of Contents: Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements



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UNIT PLAN:



Band of Brothers

Film Viewing

Stuart Dodge

Advanced Placement

American History

Curtis High School


Spring 2011
UNIT PLAN:

Band of Brothers

Film Viewing


Table of Contents:


  1. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements

  2. Rational

  3. Letter to Parents

  4. Episode Summaries

  5. Student Assignments / Assessment

  6. Resources

  7. Documents


Band of Brothers

Unit Plan

I. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements
Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements:  History

1.1 Understand and analyze historical time and chronology

1.1.3b Compare and evaluate competing historical narratives, analyze multiple perspectives, and challenge arguments of historical inevitability



1.2 Understand events, trends, individuals, and movements shaping United States, world, and Washington State history

1.2.3 Identify and analyze major concepts, people, and events in 20th century U.S. History including: WW II, the Cold War, and International Relations (1939-Present)



Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements:  Social Studies Skills

1.1 Understand and use inquiry and information skills required by citizens in a democratic society

1.1.3a Formulate a thesis statement in the social studies that examines why as well as how

1.1.3b Identify key words; use advanced search strategies; independently locate appropriate and varied information sources; evaluate primary/secondary sources

1.1.3d Evaluate reliability, credibility, and validity of information from a variety of social studies sources



3.1 Understand and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed and reasoned decisions

3.1.4a Identify central issue; formulate appropriate questions; identify multiple perspectives; compare and contrast; validate data using multiple sources; determine relevant information; paraphrase problem

3.1.4c Compare benefits and costs, suggest logical alternatives, predict probable consequences, provide evidence to justify best solution, select most effective manner of communicating solution

3.1.4d Hypothesize possible outcomes from an initial event recognizing multiple causes and accidental factors

3.1.4f Reconstruct and express multiple points of view and integrate a historic, geographic, civic, or economic perspective

Band of Brothers also fulfills the following National Standards for History for grades 5-12: chronological thinking, historical comprehension, historical analysis and interpretations.

Band of Brothers

Unit Plan

II. Rational:

Band of Brothers is appropriate as a supplement to units on World War Two, not as a substitute for material providing a more general explanation of the war’s causes, effects, and greater historical significance. As with war itself, it contains graphic violence and language; it is not for the squeamish. Mature senior high school students, however, will find in it a powerful evocation of the challenges of war and the experience of U.S. soldiers in the final phase of the European theatre. Students may chose an alternative assignment and/or temporary classroom placement if the violence or language becomes upsetting.
Band of Brothers is a ten-part video series dramatizing the history of one company of American paratroopers in World War Two—E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne, known as “Easy Company.” Although the company’s first experience in real combat did not come until June 1944 ( D-Day), this exemplary group fought in some of the war’s most harrowing battles. Band of Brothers depicts not only the heroism of their exploits but also the extraordinary bond among men formed in the crucible of war.
Band of Brothers is a compelling story which reveals a great deal about World War Two. However, as it is the story of one U.S. Army company, it reflects only a few of the war’s many facets. Topics such as the war’s origins, the prosecutions of the war up to 1943, the Pacific Theater, the Final Solution are beyond its scope. To put Band of Brothers in historical context, review a timeline of the entire war. Students should be able to answer questions such as: When did the war begin? When did the United States enter the conflict? What were the war’s major causes and what major events led up to the start of military hostilities? Who were the belligerents and what were they fighting for (or against)? What was the Holocaust and how was it part of the war as a whole? What was D-Day and what was its significance in the war’s progression? How and when did the war end in Europe and in Asia?
Band of Brothers

Unit Plan

III. Parent Letter

Dear Parents,

On Thursday May 12th, Mr. Dodge’s Advanced Placement United States History Class will begin viewing Band of Brothers. Band of Brothers is a ten-part video series dramatizing the history of one company of American paratroopers in World War Two—E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne, known as Easy Company. This series is based on a book by the same name written by Dr. Stephen Ambrose. Ambrose was the author of numerous books of history, including the New York Times bestsellers Citizen Soldiers, Undaunted Courage and D-Day. He was the founder of the Eisenhower Center and past president of the National D-Day Museum in New Orleans.

While Band of Brothers is not meant to be an in-depth study of World War Two, it will supplement our previous study of this subject matter. As with war itself, this series contains graphic violence and language. Mature senior high school students, however, will find in it a powerful evocation of the challenges of war and the experience of U.S. soldiers in the final phase of the European theatre. At any time during the viewing, students may chose an alternative assignment and/or temporary classroom placement if the violence or language becomes upsetting. Both the History Channel and the Time Magazine endorse the viewing of this program for senior high school students.

On my classroom website I have included my unit plan for the viewing of this program. This unit plan includes the matching Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements, program viewing rational and student assignments. The unit plan can be found at: www.upsd.wednet.edu If you would prefer a written copy of this unit plan I will be happy to send one home with your student.

If I can answer any questions or provide more information on the viewing of Band of Brothers or any other classroom activities, please feel free to contact my at any time.

Sincerely,

Stuart Dodge

Advanced Placement US History Teacher

Curtis High School

sdodge@upsd.wednet.edu
Band of Brothers

Unit Plan

IV: Episode Summary
Episode 1: Currahee

In Toccoa, Ga., 1942, a disparate group of young men begins voluntary training to become members of one of America's newest military regiments - the paratroopers. Under the harsh leadership of Lt. Sobel (David Schwimmer), members of the newly formed Easy Company go from green civilians to some of the Army's most elite soldiers. As training progresses, a rivalry flares between Sobel, whom the men despise, and Lt. Winters (Damian Lewis), a junior officer who's earned the respect and admiration of Easy Company.


Episode 2: Day of Days

Planes carrying thousands of paratroopers cross the English Channel into French airspace, where German flak causes the pilots to drop them in a less than safe and organized fashion. Lt. WINTERS lands alone in a field, soon joined by a Pvt. JOHN HALL (Andrew Scott) from another company. Having lost his rifle in the jump, Winters leads the anxious Hall off to find their units, carrying only a knife. They link up with a few more Easy Company men and ambush a German horse-drawn supply convoy. In a nearby town, Winters finds Easy's Lt. "BUCK" COMPTON (Neal McDonough), who tells him 90% of the company is unaccounted for, including their commander -- which puts Winters in charge. Winters is then asked to lead an attack on a cluster of German artillery pieces nearby, which are probably firing onto the seaborne infantry trying to take Utah Beach. Winters deploys his small group on the entrenched enemy positions and eventually takes four artillery pieces in succession, disabling them with TNT. The euphoria is tempered, however, when Winters finds Pvt. Hall dead, killed by machine gun fire. The mission is successful, but Winters has lost his first man as acting company commander.


Episode 3: Carentan

After regrouping in the town of Angoville-au-Plain, Easy Company tries to capture the town of Carentan. Two days after D-day, some members of Easy Company are still lost and alone in Normandy, including Pvt. ALBERT BLITHE (Marc Warren). He finds the rest of the unit just in time to help them take the town of Carentan, which Allied armor from Utah and Omaha beaches need in order to link up. During the successful fight for the town, Easy suffers several casualties, including a minor leg wound to Lt. WINTERS, and a case of "hysterical blindness" for Blithe. The company moves out to set up a defensive position and runs into a German counterattack on the way. They engage in a lengthy firefight, which eventually includes German and then American tanks. Blithe, after getting advice and encouragement from Lts. HARRY WELSH (Rick Warden), RONALD SPEIRS (Matthew Settle), and Winters, screws up his courage enough to stand up in his foxhole and fire his rifle at the enemy, eventually killing a German. But the next day, on a patrol, Blithe is shot in the neck by a sniper, a wound he will never recover from. The company returns to England after 36 days in Normandy, but their celebrations are short-lived, as news comes that they will be moving out again.



Episode 4: Replacements

A group of fresh replacements joins Easy Company in time for a massive paradrop into German-occupied Holland. The Dutch townspeople of Eindhoven welcome them as liberators. But when Easy and a cluster of British tanks move into a nearby town, they are met by a superior German force and must retreat after suffering many casualties. One of these is Sgt. "BULL" RANDLEMAN (Michael Cudlitz), who hides out overnight in a barn. A Dutch farmer and his daughter tend to him, and eventually he has to bayonet and bury a German soldier who wanders in. Meanwhile, Randleman's friends and the members of the squad he leads fear him dead, and finally decide to head back into the town to try to find him. He escapes the barn and meets them on the way, finally returning to the company and getting a warm welcome. As they move onto another assignment in Holland, Capt. WINTERS laments having to retreat, and Capt. NIXON tells him the ambitious allied operation in Holland looks to have failed.


Episode 5: Crossroads

Capt. WINTERS leads a contingent of Easy Company men on a risky mission over a Dutch dike that results in a "turkey shoot" of fleeing German soldiers. Afterwards, Col. SINK promotes him to Battalion Executive Officer, leaving Easy Co. in the hands of Lt. "MOOSE" HEYLIGER (Stephen McCole). As Winters labors over a report on the dike mission, Heyliger leads a rescue of some British soldiers escaping from the besieged town of Arnhem. Winters is dissatisfied by his new, largely administrative job. He worries about Easy, now one of three companies he helps command, especially after Heyliger is shot and seriously wounded by a nervous sentry. After moving back off the line to France, Lt. NIXON insists that Winters take a break and see Paris. Winters is haunted there by the memory of a young German solider he killed at close range on the dike. As he returns to the company at Mourmelon, news comes in of a massive German counterattack in the Ardennes Forest. Winters helps Easy race there to hold the line, his men ill-equipped for the cold weather and the battle ahead.


Episode 6: Bastogne

Easy Company digs foxholes in the snow around the Belgian town of Bastogne. They are woefully under-manned and under-supplied to hold the line against the inevitable German armored attack. Medic EUGENE ROE (Shane Taylor) scrounges morphine and other much-needed medical supplies to treat the various ailments and wounds of the men, who are bitterly cold and, in many cases, stricken with trench foot. His travels take him to a cut-off Aid Station in the surrounded, besieged town of Bastogne. There he meets a beautiful Belgian nurse named RENEE LEMAIRE (Lucie Jeanne) ministering to the horrible suffering of wounded American soldiers. Easy loses two men on an ill-fated patrol but are congratulated on Christmas Day for holding the line by Col. SINK. He reads aloud their commanding general's concise, defiant response to a German surrender demand: "Nuts!" With no sign of relief in sight, the men celebrate a miserable holiday together in their foxholes. The Germans bomb Bastogne, hitting the Aid Station and killing Renee, whose body Roe discovers.


Episode 7: The Breaking Point

Easy Company have successfully held off German attempts to take over Bastogne and are now preparing to take control of the nearby town of Foy. During the attack on Foy, the Company undergo severe artillery bombardments from the enemy. Despite every effort by Sergeant Lipton to hold the group together the attack is fierce and several Easy Company veterans are killed or maimed in the battle. The Company is at breaking point and morale is low. Sergeants Toye and Guarnere have each lost a leg in the attack, and the rest of the company must come to terms with such an horrendous blow to their camp.

It all proves a little too much for Lt. Compton, who suffers an emotional breakdown and is forced to leave the line before the moral of the camp is further destroyed. The incompetence of their commander, Lieutenant Dike, further compounds the already disastrous situation when he freezes up at a crucial moment during the battle, leaving the rest of the company open to attack. Sgt. Lipton had previously warned Capt. Winters about Dike’s emotional condition, but both were unable to do anything about him until it was too late. Lt Speirs of Dog Company is sent to relieve a distraught Lipton, and successfully leads the company to victory. The battle of Foy is a bittersweet victory for Easy Company. The town is successfully taken, but at an enormous cost to the camp.
Episode 8: The Last Patrol

There are signs that the war may be coming to an end. Easy Company have settled down in a town close to the German border and the men, although still on the front line, are finally able to sleep in houses. Just across the river are the German troops who are also relishing the same creature comforts. Easy Company receive orders to cross into enemy territory to take prisoners. Most of the troops are hoping they will not be picked to carry out the assignment. But orders must be obeyed and Sgt. Malarkey is given the call to lead the 2nd platoon across the river. Still mourning for the death of his friends at Bastogne, Malarkey is relieved when Lt. Jones asks to go in his place. Jones has just arrived in the camp from West Point and is eager to put his combat skills into practice. The move is okayed by Capt. Winters and the troop move into position. Also receiving the call to go is Pvt. Webster. Webster, having just returned to the Company after an absence to treat a relatively minor wound, is finding it hard to regain the acceptance of his old buddies. The company is able to retrieve two prisoners, but unfortunately lose a man in battle. Winters, weighing up the death of yet another man, decides to disobey orders to send a second troop into the German camp.


Episode 9: Why We Fight

It has been a long hard battle but Easy Company have finally managed to enter Germany where surprisingly, they face little resistance from the local residents. In fact their so called ‘enemies’ are so industrious that the Company begin to relax and even fraternise with the local people. Captain Nixon returns from a combat jump that unfortunately took a disastrous turn for the worse. He has now become disillusioned and cynical about the war and turns to the bottle. A worried Major Winters voices his concerns about the emotional state of his friend. Easy Company receive news that President Roosevelt has died and decide to head to another German town. Near to the town is a small forest, Winters sends a small patrol in to explore. Inside the forests the patrol are shocked and horrified to discover an abandoned concentration camp with hundreds of people still imprisoned. The Nazis have long deserted the camp leaving the mostly Jewish captives to starve. As a result many corpses now litter the prison cells. The patrol begin to free the prisoners, but are ordered to herd them back to the concentration camp so that their recovery can be more easily monitored. The rest of the Company cannot believe that the local citizens did nothing to help the prisoners, and decide that the locals should be the ones to clean up the camp and remove the many corpses. The locals comply, but maintain that they knew nothing of the camp and it’s residents. Whilst supervising the clean up, the Company receive news that Hitler has committed suicide.


Episode 10: Points

Having heard that Hitler is now dead, Easy Company enter Berchtesgaden a Bavarian town that once housed the top officers of Hitler’s Third Reich. Their objective is to capture Hitler’s mountain fortress known as Eagle’s Nest. The Company make their attack. They overcome the German forces who surrender the Eagle’s Nest fortress. Celebrations erupt throughout the camp as the men realise that the war is almost at an end and they will soon return home to their families. A victorious Easy Company travel to Austria, but their elation is short lived as they soon learn only the few men who have earned enough 'points' will be going home. The rest of the Division will be redeployed to the Pacific Theatre, where they must await official orders to leave Europe. Major Winters applies for a transfer to a unit that is moving out immediately, but his request is denied.

Sergeant Chuck Grant is critically wounded by a drunken trooper from another Company. Captain Speires is called to deal with it. Despite having enough points to go home Speires decides he will stay on as Company Commander. Major Winters however decides he does not want to make a career out of the army and accepts Captain Nixon's offer of a job with his family’s company when they return home from the war. The Japanese surrender signals the end of a long, hard, gruesome war. Winters gives the momentous news to Easy Company. Hitler is dead, the war is over and a Victorious Easy Company celebrate the end of a war in which they fought hard and won. A closing vignette tells what happened to the men of Easy Company after they returned home.

Band of Brothers

Unit Plan

V. Student Assignments/Assessments:


  1. Character Assignment:

Students will be broken up into cooperative learning groups of 4-5 students on the first day of viewing. Each group will receive a list of 4-5 character from the series. Student will use the attached chart and/or their own note paper to follow the assigned characters throughout the entire series. Students should be able to answer the following questions by series end:

a. What role did your characters play?

b. How did they develop and change from airborne training to the end of the war?

c. How did the war affect their future?
At the conclusion of the series, each learning group will discuss their answers and may chose to update and/or add to their individual character notes. The teacher may also choose to lead a whole classroom discussion in relation to the above questions. (Documents 1 & 2)



  1. Daily Study Questions:

As students come into class each day. They will use the first 10-15 minutes to answer study questions based on the previous episode. These questions will be turned in and graded every day. Students should use the time between viewing the episode and the next day’s study questions to review the episode and contemplate basic plot development. (Document 3)




  1. Letters Home:

In order to judge student understanding, promote a higher level of thinking and use a writing tool, the teacher may chose an optional daily writing assignment. The teacher can assign this assignment after each episode or after a series of several episodes. “Letters Home” can be written from the voice of the characters the students are following. Students should consider the experiances each character has been involved with and how they may describe these events with their family back home. Students need to remember that service men were limited in what they could say and that letters home were subject to official review. Teachers may chose to manipulate who the solidures are writing to. The voice will change when the reader is considered. What a character would say to his wife would be different from what he would say to his son or daughter.



VI. Resources
Teachers Guide to Accompany HBO’s Band of Brothers

http://www.time.com/time/classroom/brothers/pdfs/teachGuide.pdf:
Time Classroom

http://www.time.com/time/classroom/brothers/
INTime Magazine: Band of Brothers

http://www.time.com/time/classroom/brothers/pdfs/magazine.pdf
The History Channel: Study guide for Band of Brothers

http://www.historychannel.com/classroom/guides/
The Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements:  History

http://www.k12.wa.us/curriculumInstruct/SocStudies/historyEALRs.aspx
The Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements:  Social Studies Skills

http://www.k12.wa.us/curriculumInstruct/SocStudies/socstudiesskillsEALRs.aspx
(Document 1)

Band of Brothers

Character Notes
"Grandpa, were you a hero in the war?" "No", I answered, "But I served in a company of heroes".

-Capt. Richard Winters


From this day to the ending of the world we in it shall be remembered. We lucky few, we band of brothers. For he who today sheds his blood with me shall be my brother -Shakespeare


Character

Notes/Events

Outcome

Richard D. Winters










Carwood Lipton










Lewis Nixon










Ronald Speirs










William 'Wild Bill' Guarnere










Donald Malarkey











Lynn 'Buck' Compton










George Luz









Frank Perconte










Character

Notes/Events

Outcome

Joseph Toye










Denver 'Bull' Randleman










Warren 'Skip' Muck










John Martin










Edward 'Babe' Heffron










Floyd 'Tab' Talbert










Herbert Sobel










Joseph Liebgott










Darrel 'Shifty' Powers











Band of Brothers

Unit Plan

Character Groups

(Document 2)


GROUP #1

Richard D. Winters

Carwood Lipton

Lewis Nixon

Ronald Speirs

GROUP #2

William Guarnere

Donald Malarkey

Lynn 'Buck' Compton

Frank Perconte

GROUP #3

Eugene “Doc” Roe

Denver 'Bull' Randleman

Lynn “Buck” Compton

Edward 'Babe' Heffron


GROUP #4

David Webster



Herbert Sobel

Joseph Liebgott



Darrel 'Shifty' Powers

(Document 3)



Band of Brothers

Daily Study Questions
Episode 1: Currahee

  1. One soldier calls Lt. Sobel a “genius,” while others clearly dislike him and come to distrust him. Why was there this discrepancy and how did the men deal with it?




  1. The title of this episode is “Currahee,” a Cherokee word meaning “stands alone” and a word that became the cry of the 506th Paratroopers Regiment (which included Easy Company). One reason this became a rallying cry for the paratroopers was that they trained at Currahee Mountain when they were at Camp Toccoa. Beyond that, why might they have chosen a motto of “We stand alone, together.” What do you think this meant to the men?


Episode 2: Day of Days

  1. When Lieutenant Spiers offers cigarettes to German prisoners and then shoots them, why didn’t any of the G.I.’s say anything?




  1. Why didn’t Winters show much enthusiasm when he learned that the map he had found contained important information about the location of German gun placement throughout Normandy?


Episode 3: Caretan

  1. When Blithe confesses that he hid on D-Day rather than fight, Lt. Speirs says the following to him: “We’re all scared. You hid in that ditch because you think there’s still hope. The only hope you have is to accept the fact that you’re already dead. And the sooner you accept that, the sooner you’ll be able to function as a soldier’s supposed to function: without mercy, without compassion, without remorse. All war depends upon it.” How would you describe Lt. Speirs? Do you agree with his statement? Do you think others in the company would have?


Episode 4: Replacements

  1. Describe the relationship between the older members of Easy Company and the newer replacements. What advice did the older members give? Why were some of them ambivalent about the new arrivals?




  1. How did the Dutch residents of Eindhoven deal with men and women who collaborated with the Germans? Why did they do this? Do you think this was justified?


Episode 5: Crossroads

  1. Why does Winters spend so much time preparing his report?




  1. What kind of leadership qualities does Winters demonstrate? What makes a good leader?


Episode 6: Bastogne

  1. What difficulties did Easy Company face in executing their mission? How did they deal with these challenges?




  1. What do you think the medic Eugene Roe is thinking and feeling over the course of the episode?


Episode 7: The Breaking Point

  1. How important is morale in wartime? Why?




  1. How would you describe the psychological state of Easy Company at the end of the episode?


Episode 8: The Last Patrol

  1. What was the reaction of the narrator, Pvt. David Webster, upon his return from the hospital to the condition of Easy Company?




  1. Why did the company resent the newly arrived platoon leader, Lt. Hank Jones? Whom do you think they had a harder time accepting, Jones or Webster? Why?


Episode 9: Why we fight

  1. What ideas do the men have about their life when they get back home? How are those ideas shaped by their experience in the war?




  1. At the end of the episode, Nixon walks through the concentration camp and sees the wife of the SS officer whose house he had walked through, and she is now burying corpses. She and Nixon exchange long glances. What do you think each one was thinking?


Episode 10: Points

  1. In the scene where the SS officer surrenders to Maj. Winters, he says, “I wonder what will happen to men like you and me when there are no more wars.” What do you think he is imagining?




  1. The pent- up frustration of the war leads the soldiers into some reckless and, in some cases, extralegal behavior. Which of the men appear to deal well with the situation and which appear not to? Why is their situation so difficult at that point, especially given vastly improved conditions they are in?


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