Syllabus requirements: element 5b revised Summer 2015



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SYLLABUS REQUIREMENTS: ELEMENT 5B

Revised Summer 2015
Instructions: All syllabi for GE courses must include the following two sections:

  1. General Education Goals

  2. Student Learning Outcomes

General Education Goals: The required GE goals for Element 5B courses are listed below. Instructors may copy/paste these goals directly into syllabi.
Student Learning Outcomes: The approved, core set of student learning outcomes is listed below for each course in this GE Element. Instructors may copy/paste these SLOs directly into syllabi. These are the core set of SLOs that must appear on every syllabus, for every section of a GE course. Instructors may add to this core set other SLOs that are specific to their sections.
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ELEMENT 5B: SOCIAL & BEHAVIORALS SCIENCES
GENERAL EDUCATION GOALS FOR ELEMENT 5B COURSES

After completing the General Education Program at EKU, students will be able to:



  1. Use appropriate methods of critical thinking and quantitative reasoning to examine issues and to identify solutions. (GE Goal 2)

  2. Analyze the social and behavioral influences that explain how people relate to each other, to institutions, and to communities. (GE Goal 4)

  3. Distinguish the methods that underlie the search for knowledge in the arts, humanities, natural sciences, history, and social and behavioral sciences. (GE Goal 7)

  4. Integrate knowledge that will deepen their understanding of, and will inform their own choices about, issues of personal and public importance. (GE Goal 8)


COURSE SPECIFIC STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
All Writing Intensive Courses:

For all writing intensive courses this student learning outcome should be added to the core set of outcomes:



  1. Demonstrate a writing process that produces effective documents appropriate to course level. SLO may be reworded to fit course



ANS 200: Introduction to Animal Studies

The course will introduce students to the field of animal studies by reading, discussing, thinking, and writing about various traditions in the field, including anthropology, art, biology, history, literature philosophy, psychology, and sociology. At the end of this course students should be able to:



  1. Understand diverse methodologies to study both nonhuman animals and their interactions with people. How this objective is evaluated: Essay exams.

  2. Read, write, evaluate, and talk knowledgeably about research and theory about animals in science and the humanities. How this objective is evaluated: Class discussion, multiple-choice quizzes, essay exams.

  3. Understand diverse approaches to thinking about and representing both animals and animal-human interaction. How this objective is evaluated: Class discussion, multiple-choice quizzes, essay exams.

  4. Analyze one topic in animal studies in depth, using diverse perspectives. How this objective is evaluated: Book review, film review.

  5. Integrate class material. How this objective is evaluated: Book review, film review, essay exams.

ANT 120: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

By the end of this course you will be able to:



  1. Comprehend and describe ethnographic research methods to understand how anthropologists study culture.

  2. Comprehend and apply theoretical approaches in cultural anthropology (e.g. evolutionism, functionalism, cultural materialism, and interpretive anthropology).

  3. Analyze cultural anthropology’s perspective on culture, race, ethnicity, ethnocentrism, and cultural relativism.

  4. Analyze human behavior cross-culturally (e.g. marriage, kinship, adaptive strategies, religion, and art).

  5. Integrate concepts associated with gender, class, and racial stratification across cultures.

  6. Integrate anthropology’s perspective on the value of cultural diversity with global examples.

APP 200: Introduction to Appalachia

After completing APP 200, students will be able to:



  1. Use texts and/or technology to analyze, in writing and speaking, key components of Appalachian studies (GE Goal 1)

  2. Use appropriate methods of critical thinking and quantitative reasoning to examine Appalachian historical, social and cultural issues and to identify potential solutions to problems in the region (GE Goal 2).

  3. Analyze the human economic and social choices that have shaped how people in Appalachia relate to each other, to institutions and to communities, both historically and in the present (GE Goal 4).

  4. Use the methods of the social sciences and humanities to explore the varied representations of Appalachian cultures, originating both from within and outside the region (GE Goal 7).

  5. Identify how the actions and activism of local people and communities in Appalachia need to be understood in the context of surrounding national and global events (GE Goal 8).

  6. Analyze past and present ethnic, social, and cultural diversity and marginalization within the Appalachian region (GE Goal 9).

COM 200/200W: Mass Media and Society

Using the critical and creative thinking process students will be able to:



  1. Identify and comprehend the basic terms and concepts relevant to mass communication and society (comprehension)

  2. Identify and comprehend the social and cultural impact of various forms of mass media as well as key individuals and inventions in the mass media (comprehension)

  3. Comprehend the methods used in mass media to gather and distribute information (methods)

  4. Analyze the implications and consequences of the first amendment for mass media (analysis)

  5. Integrate relevant information, appropriate perspectives and important principles in mass media (integration)


ECO 120: Economic Reasoning and issues

At the beginning of the course students will learn how economists use methods of scientific inquiry to learn about economic behavior, and then illustrations of these methods are discussed throughout the course. Throughout the course students are required to use critical thinking and quantitative analysis (both computational mathematics and graphing skills) as economic concepts and theories are developed to explain individual decision-making, the nature of markets, and the performance of the aggregate economy. Finally, the study of economics requires that students integrate knowledge of economic concepts throughout the course.


Student Learning Outcomes

The General Education Goals are achieved through the study of economic behavior and performance. More specifically, students will study economics by using economic models, which provide a formal framework for explaining or predicting economic behavior and performance. Using models helps students learn about the nature and consequences of individual and social economic behavior. Also, using models helps students develop skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis, problem solving, and decision-making. In this course students will demonstrate the ability to:



  1. Explain how economists study economic behavior.

  2. Explain how a scarcity of economic resources and unlimited wants require societies to make decisions.

  3. Analyze the costs and benefits that individuals, businesses, institutions, and governments use to make economic decisions.

  4. Explain how different economic systems answer the fundamental economic questions.

  5. Use the demand and supply model to explain the equilibrium price and quantity in product and labor markets.

  6. Explain the factors that determine the extent of market competition.

  7. Explain the causes and consequences of market failure.

  8. Interpret the measures of total production, the price level, and the unemployment rate.

  9. Use the aggregate demand and aggregate supply model to explain how total output and the price level are determined.

  10. Explain the causes, consequences, and policy implications of unemployment and inflation.

  11. Explain the roles of fiscal and monetary policies.

  12. Explain the role of investments in human capital, physical capital, and technology in promoting economic growth.

  13. Explain how the principle of comparative advantage increases specialization and interdependence in economies.

  14. Explain the determination of foreign exchange rates and the balance of payments.


ECO 130: Contemporary Economic Problems

At the beginning of the course students will learn how economists use methods of scientific inquiry to learn what is true about economic behavior, and then illustrations of these methods are discussed throughout the course. Throughout the course students are required to use critical thinking and quantitative analysis (primarily graphing skills) as economic concepts and theories are developed to explain individual decision-making and the nature of markets. Finally, the study of microeconomics requires that students integrate knowledge of economic concepts throughout the course.


This course will cover only a few of the many economic issues facing the United States and other nations. An analysis of these issues will provide the foundation for use of economics as a problem solving approach to understanding further national and international economic and political issues.
Student Learning Outcomes

The General Education Goals are achieved through the study of economic problems facing advanced and developing economies. Students will be introduced to economics through an “economic issues” approach. They will first be introduced to fundamental economic tools and methods, which provide a formal framework for explaining, examining, and predicting economic behavior and performance. These tools and methods will then be used to address a variety of economic issues and problems. The application of these economic tools and methods to specific societal problems will help students to examine other problems and issues not formally covered in class, and to help students to learn to propose solutions to these problems, for the benefit of society and its members therein. Through the examination of a number of specific issues, students will develop skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis, problem solving, and decision-making. In this course students will demonstrate the ability to:



  1. Explain how scarce economic resources and unlimited wants require societies to make choices.

  2. Use the demand and supply model to explain the equilibrium price and quantity in product and labor markets.

  3. Use welfare economics and cost-benefit analysis to examine the impact of alternative policies on economic performance.

  4. Provide an historical prospective on contemporary economic issues.

  5. Use a rational reasoning approach to analyze contemporary economic issues.

  6. Interpret various measures of macroeconomic performance and explain the causes and consequences of unemployment and inflation.


EC0 230: Principles of Microeconomics

At the beginning of the course students will learn how economists use methods of scientific inquiry to learn what is true about economic behavior, and then illustrations of these methods are discussed throughout the course. Throughout the course students are required to use critical thinking and quantitative analysis (both computational mathematics and graphing skills) as microeconomic concepts and theories are developed to explain individual decision-making and the nature of markets. Finally, the study of microeconomics requires that students integrate knowledge of economic concepts throughout the course.


Student Learning Outcomes

The General Education Goals are achieved through the study of economic behavior and performance. More specifically, students will study economics by using economic models, which provide a formal framework for explaining or predicting economic behavior and performance. Using models helps students learn about the nature and consequences of individual and social economic behavior. Also, using models helps students develop skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis, problem solving, and decision-making. In this course students will demonstrate the ability to:



  1. Explain how economists study economic behavior.

  2. Analyze the opportunity costs of employing economic resources to produce goods and services.

  3. Use demand and supply to explain or predict changes in the price and quantity of goods and services.

  4. Interpret the price elasticity of demand and its relationship to total revenue.

  5. Use comparative advantage to determine areas of specialization and mutually beneficial terms of trade.

  6. Analyze the economic effects of government intervention.

  7. Explain the causes and consequences of market failures.

  8. Use production and cost information to analyze the behavior of a firm.

  9. Use marginal analysis to identify the profit-maximizing employment of resources, optimal output, and optimal price of a firm in competitive and imperfectly competitive markets.

  10. Analyze the factors determining the extent of competition in product markets.

  11. Use demand and supply to determine factors prices with emphasis on wages


ECO 231: Principles of Macroeconomics

The General Education Goals are achieved through the study of macroeconomic performance. More specifically, students will study economics by using economic models, which provide a formal framework for explaining or predicting macroeconomic performance. Using models helps students learn about the nature and consequences of individual and social economic behavior. Also, using models help students develop skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis, problem solving, and decision-making. In this course students will demonstrate the ability to:





  1. Explain how economists study economic behavior.

  2. Explain how such macroeconomic variables as the price level, unemployment and Gross Domestic Product are measured and their impact on consumer and business decisions.

  3. Explain economists’ views of the causes and consequences of unemployment and inflation.

  4. Use the economic models of income and price level determination to analyze business cycles and inflation in an open economy.

  5. Analyze the determinants of economic growth.

  6. Analyze the role of financial intermediaries and the Federal Reserve System in the money supply process and interest rate determination.

  7. Explain the budget effects of fiscal policy.

  8. Analyze the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policies in macroeconomic stabilization.

  9. Explain the role of foreign exchange rates in international trade.

ENV 200: The Sustainable Global Future (passed GE 2.13.14; GE rev. 9.11.14)

Students will be able to



  1. Comprehend important historical events and literature of environmental sustainability and stewardship;

  2. Describe the fundamental natural processes that influence all living organisms on earth.

  3. Explain human connections to the physical and natural world.

  4. Identify the relationship of technology and economics to sustainability; and the technical, scientific and institutional strategies that foster sustainable development.

  5. Compare and contrast differing environmental behaviors, values, and ethics.

  6. Identify social, legal and governmental strategies for motivating environmentally sustainable behavior.

  7. Integrate knowledge and experience on a specific issue of personal and public importance that deepens sustainability and stewardship understanding and informs choices about that issue.


GEO 100: Regions and Nations of the World

Students will be able to:



  1. Comprehend the human and natural makeup of geographic realms.

  2. Express ideas clearly through in class and/or online discussions.

  3. Explain how geographers study regional diversity in the cultural and natural settings of the world.

  4. Comprehend the relationships between human social systems and environmental systems in diverse geographical settings.

  5. Analyze how human activity and institutions produce changes in the landscape.

  6. Analyze the spatial structures and processes that both distinguish and connect diverse world settings.

  7. Integrate fundamental concepts of geography to explain global change.


GEO 220: Human Geography

Students will demonstrate the ability to:



  1. Comprehend the concept of “regions” and evaluate the regionalization process.

  2. Explain how to use maps and spatial data sets.

  3. Students will express ideas clearly through in class and/or online discussions.

  4. Analyze the relationships among patterns and processes at different spatial scales.

  5. Integrate knowledge about the implications of associations among phenomena in places to characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places.


POL 100/100S: Principles of Politics and Government

Having taken POL 100, you will be able to:



  1. Comprehend important concepts and theories in the study of politics.

  2. Explain and evaluate institutions and processes of political systems.

  3. Apply concepts and theories to specific political problems.

  4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the methods commonly used in the discipline.

  5. Integrate information, perspectives, and principles relevant to politics in oral and/or written communication.


POL 101: Introduction to American Government

Students will study American government using political concepts, which provide a formal framework for public policy, political behavior and government actions and institutions. Students successfully completing this course will be able to:



  1. Demonstrate comprehension of the basic institutions and processes of American politics through written and oral communication. (CCR.R.1; CCR.R.2; CCR.W.2)

  2. Demonstrate comprehension of the role of citizens in our democracy and evaluate their own roles in the political process through written and oral communication. (CCR.R.1; CCR.R.2; CCR.W.2)

  3. Apply, orally and in writing, concepts in American government to examples drawn from their everyday lives. (CCR.W.2)

  4. Analyze orally and in written form current political events, integrate information about disparate events, and evaluate their own positions. (CCR.R.1; CCR.R.2; CCR.R.7; CCR.R.8; CCR.W.1; CCR.W.2; CCR.W.9)

  5. Identify, comprehend and communicate orally and in written form selected major political developments in United States history. (CCR.R 1, 2, 7, 9, 10; CCR.W 2, 9)

  6. Analyze orally and in written form the ways in which contemporary American politics have been influenced by historical developments. (CCR.R 3, 7, 9, 10; CCR.W 1, 2, 4, 9)

  7. Evaluate primary sources as evidence for political scientists through written and oral communication. (CCR.R 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; CCR.W 1, 2, 4, 9)

  8. Demonstrate comprehension of the forms of political participation and measure the effects of participation by various groups through written and oral communication. (CCR.R.1; CCR.R.2; CCR.W.2; CCR.W.9)

  9. Explain orally and in writing the effects of social, economic, cultural, geographic and psychological factors on political ideology and political preferences. (CCR.R.1; CCR.R.2; CCR.W.1; CCR.W.2)

  10. Analyze orally and in written form political arguments and integrate new information in relation to those arguments. (CCR.R.1; CCR.R.2; CCR.R.3; CCR.R.4; CCR.R.9; CCR.W.1; CCR.W.2; CCR.W.9)

  11. Analyze and evaluate orally and in written form the impact of political choices and policies upon themselves and upon society as a whole.

POL 212: Introduction to Comparative Politics

After you have successfully completed the work required in POL 212, you will be able to:



  1. Comprehend important concepts and terminology in the study of comparative politics.

  2. Apply theoretical concepts in the analysis of political systems.

  3. Explain basic institutions and processes found in differing political systems and analyze the likely impact and trade-offs of the institutional and process choices made by different countries.

  4. Explain and trace how choices concerning contemporary political systems in selected countries developed through historical evolutionary and revolutionary change in those countries and in the global environment.

  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the methods used in comparative politics.

  6. Integrate information about institutions and processes with information about the historical-cultural, socio-economic, and/or international environments in which governments operate and draw meaningful comparisons among countries.

  7. Demonstrate an ability to use critical thinking skills in the analysis of primary source material from selected countries


POL 220: Introduction to International Relations

Having completed the course you will be able to:



  1. Comprehend and evaluate the basic institutions and processes of the international political system.

  2. Analyze the effects of social, economic, cultural, geographic, and psychological factors upon the processes of international relations.

  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the factors that influence political decisions in the international sphere.

  4. Assess the significance of the factors that influence political decisions in the international sphere using methods appropriate to the discipline. (may want to add   language that is IR specific here as examples).

  5. Apply the concepts of international relations theories to specific political problems.


POL 250: Introduction to Political Philosophy

Having completed the course you will be able to:



  1. Comprehend and evaluate alternative conceptions of the good and the just society.

  2. Explain and assess different forms of political and economic systems.

  3. Comprehend and evaluate competing views on the foundation, purpose, and scope of government and law.

  4. Apply concepts and theories to specific political problems.

  5. Comprehend basic methods commonly used in the discipline.

  6. Integrate information, perspectives, and principles relevant to politics.


POL 301: Citizen’s Assembly (CACTUS)

POL 301 will meet the following four outcomes established for the Department of Government's political science program:



  1. Civic engagement: Students will gain political literacy, including enhanced appreciation of the importance of political participation and public service, and will experience increased opportunities for civic engagement.

  2. Critical Thinking, Methodology, and Communications: Students will become more discerning consumers of political events, messages and processes by applying theories and methodologies of political science and through effective oral and written communication.

  3. Substantive Knowledge of Political Science: Students will understand the institutions, processes and values that underpin political behavior and events.

  4. Diversity in Politics: Students will demonstrate awareness of diversity considerations including the potential impact that diversity can produce in political systems and the possibility of marginalization of various societal groups.


PSY 200/200W: Introduction to Psychology

  1. Students will comprehend generally accepted psychological concepts.

  2. Students will comprehend the basic research methods used to discover psychological concepts.

  3. Students will apply psychological principles to everyday situations.

  4. Students will integrate psychological concepts across the discipline of psychology.


PSY 280/280W: Lifespan Development

This course is designed to introduce students to theories of human development throughout the lifespan. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to do the following:



  1. Demonstrate knowledge and comprehend major theoretical perspectives on human development.

  2. Demonstrate knowledge about research methods and findings related to development throughout the lifespan.

  3. Identify and integrate major concepts and themes crossing the various topics of development.

  4. Analyze and apply developmental principles and theories to their own lives and to their chosen fields of study and work.


SOC 131: Introductory Sociology (GE Rev 8.18.14)

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:



  1. Recognize and communicate orally and in written form the influence of social forces on human behavior.

  2. Distinguish major sociological paradigms and levels of analysis in oral discussion, written-essay, or exam formats.

  3. Demonstrate through oral discussion, written-essay, or exam formats how sociology, as distinguished from other disciplines, interprets the social world.

  4. Identify orally, in written form, or in exam formats how sociologists use the scientific method, including interpreting data in table and graphic form.

  5. Apply core theories and concepts to personal experiences of one or more of the following: inequality (race, gender, class), crime, and social institutions (family, economy, military, religion, education) in oral discussion, written-essay, or exam formats.



SOC 235: Social Problems

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:



  1. Explain the difference between personal troubles and public issues.

  2. Identify how social problems are the product of social organization.

  3. Use sociological concepts to interpret social problems.

  4. Analyze data to identify and explain social problems.

  5. Evaluate the effectiveness of social policies that attempt solutions.

  6. Integrate theoretical concepts with research methods sociologists use to understand problems of personal and public importance.


SWK 310: Social Welfare Policy History (GE rev 8.28.14)

Each of the Educational Outcomes below will be followed by the related course objective and its outcome measures. The student who successfully completes SWK 310 is expected to be able to:



  1. 3.1 Distinguish, appraise and integrate multiple sources of knowledge; including research-based knowledge and practice wisdom. (aligns with GE Goals 2, 4, 7)

    1. Activities: Library Visit; Understanding Social Security and Redistribution of Income Discussion

    2. Measures: Historical Paper; Current State Paper; Advocating for the DREAM Act 9.2

  2. 4.1 Recognizes the extent to which a culture’s structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create or enhance privilege and power. (aligns with GE Goal 2, 8)

    1. Activities: Extent of Wealth Inequality in America video; White privilege discussion

    2. Measure: Current State Paper; Choosing Who to Help assignment; Ideologies interview assignment

  3. 5.1 Understands the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination. (aligns with GE Goal 2, 4, 8)

    1. Activities: Recognizing and managing bias; Educating Children with Disabilities role play; Extent of Wealth Inequality in America video

    2. Measures: Understanding Social Security and Redistribution of Income assignment; Historical Paper; Current State Paper; The Cumulative Effects of Oppression;

  4. 8.1 Analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being (aligns with GE Goal 2 and 7)

    1. Activities: Understanding financial risk (healthcare); Educating Children with Disabilities role play

    2. Measures: Advocating for Just Policies; Choosing Who to Help assignment;

  5. 8.2 Collaborates with colleagues and clients for effective policy action.

    1. Activities: Prescription Equity for Women;

    2. Measures: Allocation of Resources assignment

  6. 9.1 Continuously discovers, appraises and attends to changing locales, populations, scientific and technological developments, and emerging trends in order to provide relevant services. (aligns with GE Goal 2, 4, 7, 8)

    1. Activities: Analysis of Social Security Act

    2. Measures: Quiz #3.



GE Syllabi Requirements ELEMENT 5B:Social & Behavioral Sciences Page


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