Supreme Court Cases John Marshall



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Supreme Court Cases
John Marshall

1. What was the result of many of the Supreme Court decisions made under Chief Justice John Marshall between 1801 and 1835?

(1) The system of slavery was weakened.

(2) The federal government was strengthened.

(3) The rights of workers were supported.

(4) Antitrust laws were upheld.

2. During John Marshall’s years as Chief Justice (1801–1835), the Supreme Court increased its powers by

(1) limiting the spread of slavery in the West

(2) expanding the federal supremacy clause of the Constitution

(3) joining the president in disputes with Congress

(4) staying out of disputes between the two political parties

3. How did Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice John Marshall affect government in the United States?

(1) Federal power increased at the expense of the states.

(2) Strict limits were placed on congressional use of the elastic clause.

(3) The impeachment of federal judges was declared unconstitutional.

(4) State powers under the 10th Amendment were expanded.



Answers for John Marshall

1) 2 2) 2 3) 1



Marbury v. Madison

1. The decision of the United States Supreme Court in Marbury v. Madison (1803) established the power of the

(1) House of Representatives to impeach the president

(2) Congress to override a presidential veto

(3) president to veto congressional legislation

(4) Supreme Court to determine the constitutionality of laws

2. The decision in Marbury v. Madison (1803) expanded the power of the Supreme Court by

(1) restricting the use of the elastic clause

(2) establishing the power of judicial review

(3) upholding the constitutionality of the National Bank

(4) interpreting the interstate commerce clause

3. The Supreme Court decision in Marbury v. Madison (1803) was important because it

(1) established the principle of judicial review

(2) led to the reelection of President Thomas Jefferson

(3) showed that the states were stronger than the federal government

(4) proved that the legislative branch was the most powerful branch of government

4. In the case of Marbury v. Madison (1803), the Supreme Court increased its power by

(1) establishing the practice of judicial review

(2) upholding the presidential appointment power

(3) expanding the meaning of individual liberties

(4) declaring the principle of states’ rights unconstitutional

Answers for Marbury v. Madison

1) 4 2) 2 3) 1 4) 1


Interstate commerce

1. The Supreme Court decisions in Gibbons v. Ogden and Northern Securities Co. v. United



States were based on the federal government’s power to

(1) issue patents

(2) control the stock market

(3) regulate interstate commerce

(4) encourage technological development

2. Which Supreme Court case is correctly paired with the constitutional issue it addressed?

(1) Gibbons v. Ogden — interstate commerce

(2) Dred Scott v. Sanford — executive privilege

(3) Gideon v. Wainwright — voting rights

(4) Roe v. Wade — rights of the accused

3. The Supreme Court cases of Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific R.R. v. Illinois (1886) and United States v. E. C. Knight Co. (1895) were based on laws that were intended to

(1) limit the power of big business

(2) support farmers’ efforts to increase the money supply

(3) maintain a laissez-faire approach to the economy

(4) improve working conditions for immigrants

Answers for Interstate Commerce

1) 3 2) 1 3) 1


Plessy v. Ferguson

1. The Jim Crow legal system, which expanded in the South after Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), was based on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the

(1) due process clause of the 5th Amendment

(2) states’ rights provision of the 10th Amendment

(3) equal protection clause in the 14th Amendment

(4) voting rights provision in the 15th Amendment

2. The Supreme Court decision in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) had a major impact on the lives

of African Americans because it ruled that

(1) segregation was illegal in educational institutions

(2) voting was a right guaranteed by the Constitution

(3) separate but equal public facilities were legal

(4) military occupation of the South was unconstitutional

3. In Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), the Supreme Court ruled that

(1) states may not secede from the Union

(2) racial segregation was constitutional

(3) slaves are property and may not be taken from their owners

(4) all western territories should be open to slavery

4. What was the decision of the Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)?

(1) Black Codes were unconstitutional.

(2) The citizenship principle established in Dred Scott v. Sanford was repealed.

(3) The 15th amendment failed to guarantee the right to vote to all males.

(4) Racial segregation did not violate the equal protection provision of the 14th amendment.




Answers for Plessy v. Ferguson

1) 3 2) 3 3) 2 4) 4


Schenck v. United States

1. The 1919 Supreme Court decision in Schenck v. United States established the “clear and present danger” test as a method of

(1) controlling the activities of organized crime

(2) determining the limits of freedom of expression

(3) limiting the powers of the president during wartime

(4) establishing qualifications for United States participation in the League of Nations

2. The Supreme Court decision in Schenck v. United States (1919) stated that

(1) immigrants have limited rights

(2) freedom of speech is not absolute

(3) rights of the accused may not be limited

(4) women should be granted suffrage

3. The “clear and present danger” doctrine stated by the Supreme Court in the case of Schenck v. United States (1919) had an important impact on the Bill of Rights because it

(1) limited the powers of the president

(2) placed limits on freedom of speech

(3) clarified standards for a fair trial

(4) expanded the rights of persons accused of crimes

4. The clear-and-present danger doctrine established in Schenck v. United States (1919) permits the government to

(1) declare war on any nation that attacks the United States

(2) limit speech that threatens the security of the nation

(3) break up monopolies that limit business competition

(4) outlaw organizations that threaten the civil rights of others

5. Which issue was the focus of the Supreme Court decision in Schenck v. United States (1919)?

(1) freedom of speech for war protesters

(2) relocation of ethnic minority groups

(3) use of detention camps for enemy aliens

(4) integration of military forces

6. In Schenck v. United States (1919), the Supreme Court upheld the right of government to protect national security during wartime by

(1) nationalizing important industries that supported the war effort

(2) limiting speech that presented a clear and present danger to the nation

(3) suspending the writ of habeas corpus for illegal aliens

(4) expelling enemy aliens who had favored the Central Powers

Answers for Schenck v. United States

1) 2 2) 2 3) 2 4) 2 5) 1 6) 2


Korematsu v. United States
1. Which federal policy was enacted during World War II and justified as a wartime necessity?

(1) a ban on German-language books

(2) internment of Japanese Americans

(3) exclusion of Chinese immigrants

(4) adoption of the quota system of immigration

2. Which wartime policy toward Japanese Americans was upheld by the Supreme Court in

its 1944 ruling in Korematsu v. United States?

(1) deportation to Japan

(2) mandatory military service

(3) denial of voting rights

(4) confinement in internment camps

3. Which factor contributed to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II?

(1) labor shortage during the war

(2) influence of racial prejudice

(3) increase of terrorist activities on the West Coast

(4) fear of loss of jobs to Japanese workers

4. The United States Supreme Court decision in Korematsu v. United States (1944) concerned

(1) restricting freedom of the press

(2) the president’s right to use atomic weapons

(3) limiting civil liberties during wartime

(4) the right of women to serve in military combat

5. The decision of the Supreme Court in Korematsu v. United States (1944) upheld the power of the president during wartime to

(1) ban terrorists from entering the country

(2) limit a group’s civil liberties

(3) stop mistreatment of resident legal aliens

(4) deport persons who work for enemy nations


6. “. . . The Director of the War Relocation Authority is authorized and directed to formulate and effectuate [implement] a program for the removal, from the areas designated from time to time by the Secretary of War or appropriate military commander under the authority of Executive Order No. 9066 of February 19, 1942, of the persons or classes of persons designated under such Executive Order, and for their relocation, maintenance, and supervision. . . .” — Executive Order 9102, March 18, 1942 Shortly after this executive order was signed, federal government authorities began to

(1) move Japanese Americans to internment camps

(2) deport German and Italian aliens

(3) detain and interrogate Chinese immigrants

(4) arrest the individuals who planned the attack on Pearl Harbor
7. During World War II, many Japanese Americans living on the West Coast were relocated to detention centers primarily because they

(1) were known spies for Japan

(2) were seen as a security threat

(3) refused to serve in the United States military

(4) expressed their support for Italy and Germany
Base your answer to question 8 on the quotation below and on your knowledge of social studies.

Korematsu was not excluded from the military area because of hostility to him or his race. He was excluded because we are at war with the Japanese Empire, because the . . . authorities feared an invasion of our West Coast and felt constrained to take proper



security measures.”—Justice Hugo Black Korematsu v. United States, 1944
8. Which generalization is supported by this quotation?

(1) Individual rights need to be maintained in national emergencies.

(2) The Supreme Court lacks the power to block presidential actions taken during

wartime.


(3) Individual rights can be restricted under certain circumstances.

(4) Only the Supreme Court can alter the constitutional rights of American citizens.



Answers for Korematsu v. United States

1) 2 2) 4 3) 2 4) 3 5) 2 6) 1 7) 2 8) 3



Brown v. Board of Education

1. “We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.”

Brown v. Board of Education (1954)

Which constitutional idea was the basis for this Supreme Court decision?

(1) protection against double jeopardy

(2) equal protection of the law

(3) freedom of speech

(4) right of assembly

2. “We conclude that in the field of public education, the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’

has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. . . .” — Chief Justice Earl Warren, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka This quotation illustrates the Supreme Court’s

power to

(1) uphold previous decisions

(2) overrule state laws

(3) check the powers of the executive branch

(4) provide for educational funding

3. In 1954, the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka advanced the civil rights movement by

(1) guaranteeing equal voting rights to African Americans

(2) banning racial segregation in hotels and restaurants

(3) declaring that racial segregation in public schools violated the 14th amendment

(4) upholding the principle of separate but equal public facilities

4. Which constitutional principle was tested in the cases of Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka?

(1) separation of powers

(2) popular sovereignty

(3) equal protection of the law

(4) separation of church and state

5. Information provided by the map most clearly supports the conclusion that by 1964 racial

desegregation of Southern schools was

(1) failing in Oklahoma, Missouri, Kentucky, and West Virginia

(2) supported by most voters in the South

(3) occurring at different rates in Southern states

(4) completed by the mid-1960s

6. The school desegregation that is shown on the map was most affected by the

(1) decline of the Ku Klux Klan

(2) passage of the equal rights amendment

(3) expansion of voting rights for African Americans

(4) decision of the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

Base your answer to question 7 on the statement below and on your knowledge of social studies.

“. . . Whenever normal agencies prove inadequate to the task and it becomes necessary for the Executive Branch of the Federal Government to use its powers and authority to uphold Federal Courts, the President’s responsibility is inescapable. In accordance with that responsibility, I have today issued an Executive Order directing the use of troops under Federal authority to aid in the execution of Federal law at Little Rock, Arkansas.

This became necessary when my Proclamation of yesterday was not observed, and the obstruction of justice still continues. . . . “

President Dwight D. Eisenhower, September 24, 1957


7. The situation described in this statement grew out of efforts to

(1) uphold the Voting Rights Act

(2) pass a constitutional amendment ending poll taxes

(3) enforce the decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

(4) extend the Montgomery bus boycott to Little Rock

Answers for Brown v. Board of Education

1) 2 2) 2 3) 3 4) 3 5) 3 6) 4 7) 3


Rights of the Accused

1 The requirement that all persons placed under arrest must be informed of their legal rights

resulted from a

(1) custom adopted from English common law

(2) law enacted by Congress

(3) decision of the United States Supreme Court

(4) specific statement in the original Constitution

2. In the 1960s, Supreme Court decisions in the cases Miranda v. Arizona and Gideon v.



Wainwright specifically protected the rights of

(1) the accused

(2) women

(3) military veterans

(4) persons with disabilities

3. In Gideon v. Wainwright (1963) and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), the Supreme Court ruled that persons convicted of crimes had been

(1) denied due process of law

(2) denied a speedy and public trial

(3) victimized by illegal search and seizure

(4) sentenced to cruel and unusual punishment

4. What was a central issue in the Supreme Court cases of Gideon v. Wainwright (1963) and

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)?

(1) freedom of religion

(2) voting rights

(3) rights of the accused

(4) property rights

5. As a result of the Supreme Court ruling in Miranda v. Arizona (1966), a person accused of a crime is entitled to

(1) a speedy trial

(2) reasonable bail

(3) a reading of his or her rights at the time of arrest

(4) protection against cruel or unusual punishment

6. The Supreme Court decisions in Gideon v. Wainwright (1963) and Miranda v. Arizona

(1966) have been criticized because these rulings

(1) expanded the rights of the accused

(2) granted more powers to federal judges

(3) lengthened prison sentences for the guilty

(4) reinstated the use of capital punishment

7. Supreme Court decisions in Mapp v. Ohio, Gideon v. Wainwright, and Miranda v. Arizona affected individual liberties by

(1) eliminating the poll tax as a voting requirement

(2) preventing the use of organized prayer in public schools

(3) requiring equal pay for men and women performing the same job

(4) expanding the constitutional rights of people accused of crimes

8. The Supreme Court decisions in Mapp v. Ohio, Gideon v. Wainright, and Miranda v. Arizona all expanded

(1) integration of public facilities

(2) rights of the accused

(3) presidential powers

(4) equality in the workplace

9. One similarity in the Supreme Court decisions in Gideon v. Wainwright and Miranda v. Arizona is that both decisions

(1) expanded the rights of the accused

(2) improved the ability of the police to gather evidence

(3) lengthened sentences for violent felony offenses

(4) set limits on the use of the death penalty

10. The police enter an individual’s home without invitation or a warrant and seize evidence to be used against the individual. Which Supreme Court decision may be used to rule this evidence inadmissible in court?

(1) Baker v. Carr

(2) Gideon v. Wainwright

(3) Mapp v. Ohio

(4) Roe v. Wade



Answers for Rights of the Accused

1) 3 2) 1 3) 1 4) 3 5) 3 6) 1 7) 4 8) 2 9) 1 10) 3


New York Times Co. v. United States

1. The case of John Peter Zenger (1735) and New York Times Co. v. United States (1971) both involved a government’s attempt to limit

(1) freedom of religion

(2) freedom of the press

(3) the right to bear arms

(4) the right to counsel

2. Court decisions in the trial of John Peter Zenger (1735) and the case of New York Times Co. v. United States (1971) strengthened

(1) freedom of religion

(2) freedom of the press

(3) due process rights

(4) the right to counsel

3. The Supreme Court decisions in New York Times Co. v. United States (1971) and United States v. Nixon (1974) reinforced the principle that the president of the United States

(1) has unlimited use of the veto power

(2) is protected from unfair media criticism

(3) may not be convicted of a crime

(4) is not above the law

4. The decisions of the United States Supreme Court in Tinker v. Des Moines and New York

Times Co. v. United States were based on interpretations of the

(1) meaning of a republican form of government

(2) powers delegated specifically to Congress

(3) president’s right to executive privilege

(4) rights guaranteed by the 1st amendment

Answers for New York Times Co. v. United States

1) 2 2) 2 3) 4 4) 4


Rights of Students

1. The Supreme Court cases of Tinker v. Des Moines and New Jersey v. TLO involved the issue of

(1) freedom of the press

(2) freedom of religion

(3) the rights of students in school

(4) the rights of prison inmates

2. In the Supreme Court cases New Jersey v. T.L.O. and Tinker v. Des Moines School District, the Court ruled that

(1) individual student rights are more important than a safe school environment

(2) students can be expelled from school without a hearing

(3) civil liberties can be both protected and limited in schools

(4) the Bill of Rights does not apply to minors

Answers for Rights of Students

1) 3 2) 3


Engle v. Vitale

1. The cartoonist is commenting on public reaction to the Supreme Court decision that

(1) restricted attendance in churches

(2) mandated home-based prayer

(3) declared school-sponsored prayer unconstitutional

(4) banned public observance of religious holidays

Answers for Engle v. Vitale

1) 3


Roe v. Wade

1 The Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade (1973) was based on the constitutional principle of

(1) protection of property rights

(2) freedom of speech

(3) right to privacy

(4) freedom of religion



Answers for Roe v. Wade

1) 3


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