Summer 2015 English University of Toronto Scarborough posting date



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SUMMER 2015

English
University of Toronto Scarborough
POSTING DATE: March 13, 2015

CLOSING DATE: April 10, 2015
The following position(s) for a Sessional Lecturers is (are) available in Department of English at the University of Toronto Scarborough for the Summer 2015 academic session. This posting is in accordance with the Collective Agreement between The Governing Council of the University of Toronto and the Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 3902 (Unit 3). In accordance with the Collective Agreement, this posting is being sent as an email notification to all applicants in the Department 19s Applicant Pool: all Sessional Lecturers who are teaching for the Department during the current academic year or who have taught for the Department since September 1, 2005, and all persons who have submitted an application within the past twenty four months. All pool members who wish to be considered for a particular position must submit an application including a current CV and detailed course outline with reading list to Professor Christine Bolus-Reichert, Chair of the Department of English, University of Toronto Scarborough using the online application system found athttps://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/webapps/slship/jobs.php
Salary: in accordance with the current CUPE3902 Unit 3 Collective Agreement, the stipend rate for a half course (Y, F or S), inclusive of vacation pay, will be:
Sessional Lecturer I: $7,125

Sessional Lecturer I Long Term (Six or more years as SL I): $7,260

Sessional Lecturer II: $7,575

Sessional Lecturer III: $7,925


Please note that should rates stipulated in the collective agreement vary from rates stated in this posting, the rates stated in the collective agreement shall prevail.
Appointment Dates: May 1, 2015 to August 31, 2015

Sessional Dates (including exam periods): May 4, 2015 to August 20, 2015


Course Code

and Title

Course Desc.

Lec. Sec.

Course

Enroll. (est.)

Number of

Positions (est.)

Qualifications

Duties

Estimated TA Support (Hours)

ENGB06H3

Canadian Literature I: Imagining the Nation



A study of Canadian literature from pre-contact to 1920. This course explores the literatures of the 'contact zone," from Indigenous oral and textual literature, to European journals of exploration and discovery, to the literature of pioneer settlers, to the writing of the post-Confederation period.

01

50

1

Ph.D. in English or related field, or relevant teaching experience. Strong academic record and professional promise. Teaching experience is an asset, especially previous experience in the teaching of Canadian Literature.

All normal duties related to the design and teaching of a university credit course, including preparation and delivery of course content; development, administration and marking of assignments; calculation and submission of grades; holding regular office hours.

None

ENGB34H3

The Short Story



An introduction to the short story as a literary form. This course examines the origins and recent development of the short story, its special appeal for writers and readers, and the particular effects it is able to produce.

30

120

1

Ph.D. in English or related field, or relevant teaching experience. Strong academic record and professional promise. Teaching experience is an asset, especially previous experience in the teaching of the short story.

All normal duties related to the design and teaching of a university credit course, including preparation and delivery of course content; development, administration and marking of assignments; calculation and submission of grades; holding regular office hours.

120 hours total

ENGD13H3

Rap Poetics



An intensive study of rhetoric, genre, meaning, and form in rap lyrics. The three-decade-plus recorded history of this popular poetry will be discussed in rough chronological order. Aspects of African-American poetics, as well as folk and popular song, germane to the development of rap will be considered, as will narrative and vernacular strategies in lyric more generally; poetry's role in responding to personal need and to social reality will also prove relevant.


01

22

1

Ph.D. in English or related field, or relevant teaching experience. Strong academic record and professional promise. Teaching experience is an asset, especially previous experience in the teaching of poetry and/or popular song lyrics.

All normal duties related to the design and teaching of a university credit course, including preparation and delivery of course content; development, administration and marking of assignments; calculation and submission of grades; holding regular office hours.

None.

ENGD14H3

Topics in Early Modern English Literature



An advanced inquiry into critical questions relating to the development of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature and culture. Focus may include the intensive study of an author, genre, or body of work.Pre-1900 course

01

22

1

Ph.D. in English or related field, or relevant teaching experience. Strong academic record and professional promise. Teaching experience is an asset, especially previous experience in the teaching of Early Modern Literature.

All normal duties related to the design and teaching of a university credit course, including preparation and delivery of course content; development, administration and marking of assignments; calculation and submission of grades; holding regular office hours.

None



Note: all positions involve completion of any course grading not finished by August 2015.


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