Summary of Deployable Units by Country: uk: Royal Marines (fully deployed), sas units, 1



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Summary of Deployable Units by Country:

UK: Royal Marines (fully deployed), SAS Units, 1st Armoured Division (Germany) and 3rd Mechanized Division (UK), 16th Air Assault Brigade (UK) are ready for deployment at all times.

Currently Royal Marines are deployed with support elements from the from 7th Armoured Brigade of the 1st Armoured Division.

Italy:


France:

What current French, Italian and British units are currently out of the country? How many? We are specifically looking for special ops, marines, naval infantry, etc. For the French, look at the troops that just ended operations in Ivory Coast. The French have a history of bringing troops out of one theater into another (the Indo China corps got sent to Algeria after Diem Bien Phu, for example).

UK:

Africa (SOURCE)

  • International Mine Action Training Center (IMATC) – Demining in Kenya

  • Peace Support Training Center -

Brunei (SOURCE)

  • Infantry training Battalion with Bell 212 Helicopter Flight of Army Air Corps

Canada (SOURCE)

  • British Army Training Unit Suffield (BATUS) in Alberta Province – one Regiment cycled through every 6 months.

Cyprus (SOURCE)

  • Joint Service Signals Unit at Ayios Nikolaos

    • 62 Cyprus Support Squadron Royal Engineers

    • 16 Flight Army Air Corps (equipped with Gazelle helicopters) at Dhekelia.

Germany



  • 1st UK Armoured Division – HQ Herford, Germany (SOURCE)

    • 7th Armoured Brigade – HQ Hohne, Germany (elements deployed to SOURCE)

      • 2nd Medical Regiment

      • 207 HQ & Signal Squadron (elements deployed SOURCE )

      • The 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Formation Reconnaissance) (elements deployed SOURCE)

      • The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys) (Armoured) based at Bad Fallingbostel (elements deployed (SOURCE)

      • The Highlanders, 4th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (Armoured

      • Infantry) based at Bad Fallingbostel (SOURCE)

      • 3rd Battalion, The Mercian Regiment (Staffords) (Armoured Infantry) based at

      • Bad Fallingbostel (deployed) SOURCE)

      • 2nd Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers (Light Role) based at Celle

    • Attached to 7th Armoured

      • 3 Regiment Royal Horse Artillery (Self Propelled Artillery) based at Hohne (SOURCE)

      • 32 Regiment Royal Engineers based at Hohne (SOURCE)

      • 2 Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers based at Bad Fallingbostel (SOURCE)

      • 111 Provost Company Royal Military Police based at Hohne (SOURCE)



    • 20th Armoured Brigade – HQ Paderborn, Germany

      • 1st Queen's Dragoon Guards (SOURCE)

      • The Queen's Royal Hussars (SOURCE)

      • First Battalion (1 PWRR) (SOURCE)

      • 1 YORKS (SOURCE)

      • 5 RIFLES (SOURCE)

      • 200 Sig Sqn (SOURCE)



  • 1st UK Signal Brigade, (SOURCE)

    • 7 Signal Regiment

    • 16 Signal Regiment

    • 22 Signal Regiment

    • Support Batallion HQ AARC



  • United Kingdom Support Command (Germany) (UKSC(G))

Gibralter

  • Royal Gibralter Regiment (Infantry regiment made up of locals)

Libya

  • SAS presence, total number unknown, six captured by Libyans in March (SOURCE)



FRENCH ARMY

http://www.defense.gouv.fr/var/dicod/storage/images/base-de-medias/images/operations/logo-et-photo-d-appel-par-defaut/fond-carte-operation/573649-10-fre-fr/fond-carte-operation_article_pleine_colonne.gif

  • Total: 8,617 Deployed

  • Ivory Coast:

    • 900 in Licorn operation SOURCE

    • 10-20 in UNOCI were implementing cease fire. SOURCE

  • Polynesia:

    • 560 men (310 permanent, 250 rotating in and out)



AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE DEPLOYMENT

UK (Jane’s)

HQ 1st Armoured Division – Herford Germany

3rd 3rd (UK) Mechanised Division (Bulford in Wiltshire)


  • 1 Mechanized Brigade (SOURCE)

  • 4th Mechanized Brigade (SOURCE)

  • 11 Light Brigade SOURCE

  • 12 Mechanized Brigade (SOURCE)

  • 19 Light Brigade (SOURCE)

  1. 52 Infantry Brigade (SOURCE)

16 Air Assault Brigade:

Active Duty



  • 216 (Parachute) Headquarters and Signal Squadron

  • 1 Mechanized Brigade HQ and Signal Squadron (215)

  • 102 Logistic Brigade

  • 104 Logistic Support Brigade

  • 7th Parachute Regiment Royal Horse Artillery

  • Household Cavalry Regiment

  • 5th, 16th,32nd,39th and 47th Regiment Royal Artillery

  • 23 Engineer Regiment (Air Assault)

  • 1st Battalion Irish Guards

  • The Royal Highland Fusilier, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

  • The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

  • 1st Battalion, the Royal Irish Regiment

  • 2nd Battalion, the Parachute Regiment

  • 3rd Battalion, the Parachute Regiment

  • Pathfinder Group

  • 1, 3, 4 and 9 Regiment Army Air Corps

  • 9 Regiment Royal Logistic Corps

  • 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • 13 Air Assault Support Regiment Royal Logistic Corps

  • 16 Medical Regiment, royal Army Medical Corps

  • 7 (Air Assault) Battalion Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • 156 Provost Company, Royal Military Police

  • 158 Provost Company, Royal Military Police

  • 1st Miliatary Working Dog Regiment

  • The Honourable Artillery Company



Reservist Regiments:

  • 100-106 Regiment Royal Artillery

  • 101 Engineer Regiment (EOD)

  • 7th Battallion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

  • 2 Royal Irish

  • 4 PARA

  • The London Regiment

  • The Welsh Transport Regiment, RLC

  • 166 Supply Regiment, RLC

  • 168 Pioneer Regiment, RLC

  • 101 Force Support Battalion, REME

  • 103 Battalion, REME

  • Military Provost Staff

TROOPS DEPLOYED TO AFGHANISTAN:

  • Italy - 3815

  • UK - 9500

  • France - 4,000

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3 Commando Brigade is the Royal Navy’s Amphibious infantry which is on permanent standby for deployement (SOURCE)

3 Commando Brigade 45 Commando Royal Marines (plus Reserve support) and 45 Commando Royal Marines (plus Reserve support)

3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines have replaced 16 Air Assault Brigade as the lead formation of British troops in Helmand province, for Operation HERRICK 14, supported by units from 7 Armoured Brigade. They took over control on 9 April 2011.

3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines have replaced 16 Air Assault Brigade as the lead formation of British troops in Helmand province, for Operation HERRICK 14, supported by units from 7 Armoured Brigade. They took over control on 9 April 2011. (SOURCE)

The Royal Marines 3 Commando Brigade is the Royal Navy's amphibious infantry on permanent readiness to deploy across the globe.



British Army units deploying with 3 Commando Brigade (Royal Navy) include (SOURCE):

  • 42 Commando Royal Marines, including members of the Maritime Reserve (SOURCE)

  • 45 Commando Royal Marines, including members of the Maritime Reserve (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 30 Commando Information Exploitation Group, Royal Marines (SOURCE)

  • Headquarters, 104 Logistic Brigade

  • Elements of 7 Armoured Brigade Headquarters and Signal Squadron 207 (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 3rd Regiment Royal Horse Artillery (C Bty RHA are now committed to Operation HERRICK 14 as part of 29 Cdo Regt RA and will support 4 SCOTS - SOURCE)

  • Elements of The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys) (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 9th/12th Lancers (Prince of Wales's) (SOURCE)

  • 4th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (SOURCE)

  • 3rd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (SOURCE)

  • 2nd Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles (SOURCE)

  • 1st Battalion The Rifles (SOURCE)

  • 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery  (SOURCE)

  • 24 Commando Engineer Regiment (SOURCE)

  • Elements of Engineer Regiment

  • Elements of 101 (City of London) Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 170 (Infrastructure Support) Engineer Group (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 3rd (UK) Division Headquarters and Signal Regiment ()

  • Elements of Signal Regiment ()

  • Elements of Army Air Corps

  • Elements of The Royal Logistic Corps

  • 2 Close Support Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of Air Assault Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of 101 Force Support Battalion Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of Royal Military Police

Forces deployed along with the 3 Commando Brigade (SOURCE):

  • 3 Commando Brigade Headquarters, Royal Marines ()

  • Elements of 30 Commando Information Exploitation Group, Royal Marines (SOURCE)

  • Elements of the Royal Navy forming Headquarters Joint Force Support (Afghanistan),

including members of the Maritime Reserve

  • Headquarters, 104 Logistic Support Brigade (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 7 Armoured Brigade Headquarters and Signal Squadron (207) (SOURCE )

  • 42 Commando Royal Marines, including members of the Maritime Reserve (SOURCE)

  • 45 Commando Royal Marines, including members of the Maritime Reserve (SOURCE)

  • Commando Logistic Regiment, Royal Marines (SOURCE)

  • Elements of the Royal Navy forming the in-theatre Medical Regiment and Field Hospital (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 845 Naval Air Squadron, including members of the Maritime Reserve http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operations-and-support/fleet-air-arm/naval-air-squadrons/845/

  • Elements of 846 Naval Air Squadron http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operations-and-support/fleet-air-arm/naval-air-squadrons/846/

  • Elements of 847 Naval Air Squadron http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operations-and-support/fleet-air-arm/naval-air-squadrons/847/

  • Elements of 857 Naval Air Squadron, including members of the Maritime Reserve http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operations-and-support/fleet-air-arm/naval-air-squadrons/857/

  • Elements of 854 Naval Air Squadron http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operations-and-support/fleet-air-arm/naval-air-squadrons/854/

  • Elements of the Royal Naval Regulators

  • Elements of 3rd Regiment Royal Horse Artillery http://www.army.mod.uk/artillery/units/3rha/default.aspx

  • Elements of The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys) (of the 7th Armor Brigade) (SOURCE)

  • Elements of 9th/12th Lancers (Prince of Wales's) (Hohne, Germany) http://www.army.mod.uk/armoured/regiments/1632.aspx

  • 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery (Plymoth, Devon UK) http://www.army.mod.uk/artillery/units/29_cmdo_regt_ra/default%20.aspx

  • Elements of 5th Regiment Royal Artillery (1 Surveillance & Target Acq. and a Troop deployed) http://www.army.mod.uk/artillery/units/6797.aspx

  • Elements of 12th Regiment Royal Artillery (http://www.army.mod.uk/artillery/units/16_regt_ra/default%20.aspx)

  • Elements of 16th Regiment Royal Artillery

  • Elements of 26th Regiment Royal Artillery

  • Elements of 32nd Regiment Royal Artillery

  • Elements of 39th Regiment Royal Artillery

  • Elements of 47th Regiment Royal Artillery

  • 24 Commando Engineer Regiment

  • Elements of 12 (Air Support) Engineer Group

  • Elements of 22 Engineer Regiment

  • Elements of 28 Engineer Regiment

  • Elements of 32 Engineer Regiment

  • Elements of 36 Engineer Regiment

  • Elements of 42 Engineer Regiment (Geographic)

  • Elements of 101 (City of London) Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal)

  • Elements of 170 (Infrastructure Support) Engineer Group

  • Elements of 3rd (UK) Division Headquarters and Signal Regiment

  • Elements of 10th Signal Regiment

  • Elements of 14th Signal Regiment (Electronic Warfare)

  • Elements of 21st Signal Regiment (Air Support)

  • Elements of 22nd Signal Regiment

  • 4th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

  • 3rd Battalion The Mercian Regiment

  • 2nd Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles

  • 1st Battalion The Rifles

  • Elements of 1 Regiment, Army Air Corps

  • Elements of 3 Regiment, Army Air Corps

  • Elements of 2 Logistic Support Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 9 Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 17 Port and Maritime Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 23 Pioneer Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 24 Postal Courier and Movement Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 27 Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 29 Postal Courier and Movement Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps

  • 2 Close Support Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of 7 Air Assault Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of 101 Force Support Battalion Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of 104 Force Support Battalion Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of 5th Regiment Royal Military Police

  • Elements of 111 Provost Company Royal Military Police

  • Elements of 114 Provost Company Royal Military Police

  • Elements of Special Investigations Branch United Kingdom

  • Elements of 1 Military Working Dogs Regiment

  • Elements of 1 Military Intelligence Brigade

  • Elements of the Military Stabilisation Support Group (MSSG)

  • Elements of 6th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (Volunteers)

  • Elements of 4th Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Volunteers)

  • Elements of 6th Battalion The Rifles (Volunteers)

  • Elements of 88 Postal and Courier Regiment (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 151 (London) Transport Regiment (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 158 (Royal Anglian) Transport Regiment (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic

Corps

  • Elements of 162 Movement Control Regiment (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 166 Supply Regiment (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 148 Expeditionary Force Institute Squadron (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic

Corps

  • Elements of 383 Commando Petroleum Troop (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 395 Air Despatch Troop (Volunteers), The Royal Logistic Corps

  • Elements of 102 Battalion (Volunteers), Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

  • Elements of the Military Provost Staff and Military Provost Staff (Volunteers)

  • Elements of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force

  • Number 6 Royal Air Force, Force Protection Wing Headquarters

  • Elements of HQ Royal Air Force Police Wing

  • 58 Squadron, Royal Air Force Regiment

  • 617 Squadron, Royal Air Force

  • 31 Squadron, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 5 (Army Co-operation) Squadron, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 18 Squadron Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 24 Squadron Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 27 Squadron Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 28 Squadron Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 30 Squadron Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 78 Squadron Royal Air Force

  • Elements of the Tactical Supply Wing, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 1 Air Mobility Wing, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 1 Air Control Centre, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 90 Signals Unit, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 2 (Mechanical Transport) Squadron, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 5001 Squadron, Royal Air Force

  • Elements of 3 Mobile Catering Squadron

  • Elements of Tactical Medical Wing

  • Elements of 1 (Expeditionary Logistics) Squadron

  • Elements of 93 (Expeditionary Armaments) Squadron

  • Elements of Tactical Imagery Wing

  • Elements of Joint Ground Based Air Defence

  • Elements of Defence HUMINT Unit

  • Elements of the Joint Support Chain Services

Afghanistan Deployment:

United Kingdom: Apx. 9500 (SOURCE)

France: 3979 (SOURCE)

Italy: 3815 (SOURCE)






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http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/royalmarines/units-and-deployments/3-commando-brigade/30-commando-information-exploitation-group/index.htm

30 Commando Information Exploitation Group Royal Marines

30 Commando Information Exploitation Group was, until March 2010, known as United Kingdom Landing Force Command Support Group (UKLF CSG), which itself grew out of 3 Commando Brigade's Headquarters and Signals Squadron.  The Unit’s role, however, extends back further to Royal Marines units tasked with signals, reconnaissance and intelligence operations during the Second World War.  It achieved major unit status in 2000, and is now a multifunctional "information regiment" of some 465 personnel, though during operations this figure increases significantly as additional units are taken under command.  The unit is designed to achieve information superiority within assigned battlespace by all available means, and contribute to component and joint information activity in order to enable 3 Commando Brigade operations.


 
Much of its capability lies in its four organic squadrons.  Support Squadron personnel comprise the bulk of the Brigade Reconnaissance Force.  This highly trained unit is made up of reconnaissance specialists tasked with operating ahead of the main brigade force.  Y Squadron comprises electronic warfare specialists, able to gain intelligence on the enemy and increase situational awareness by intercepting enemy communications systems.  Communications Squadron operates and maintains the wide variety of communications systems and media available to the Commander, and provides personnel to set up and run the Brigade Headquarters when deployed.  Logistics Squadron role is to MOVE, SUSTAIN and PROTECT the Brigade and 30 Commando Headquarters.  Organic sub units provide specialist functions, such as air defence for the Brigade Headquarters, and the unit also tasks and coordinates non-organic assets, such as aerial reconnaissance platforms, to achieve its effect.

30 Commando fuses and links Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) to provide broad understanding of an operational environment and the enemy.  This is combined with Information Operations, including Electronic Warfare and Psychological Operations to achieve effect on the minds of target audiences.  In addition, the Unit maintains it’s traditional enabling role; providing communications, IT and Life Support to the Brigade HQ.

Winning the information battle and achieving information superiority requires the prosecution of three key effects with greater tempo and accuracy than the adversary:

(1)  Obtain information (FIND).

(2)  Derive intelligence from it (UNDERSTAND).

(3)  Life support, protection of communications and information systems and IT (ENABLE).

30 Commando ensures that the Brigade Commander has superior situational awareness, allowing him to make quicker, more accurate decisions and to target his adversary's key capabilities. In order to carry out its role in sustaining and protecting Brigade Headquarters, it has forces transferred to it from other parts of the Brigade. This process of tasking, fusing and coordinating a number of diverse capabilities to achieve a single aim is central to the way it does its business and is carried out in the Commando Headquarters, which is composed of a number of functional cells dealing with specialist capabilities, conjoined to Brigade Headquarters.

The Unit has developed through successive operational trial and validation.  Operations in Iraq and repeatedly in Afghanistan have driven this evolution.  It has become a model which Joint and Army Headquarters have successfully emulated.  The evolution, of course, continues.

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http://www.arrc.nato.int/alliedrapidreactioncorps/signals_brigade.aspx



1 (UK) Signals Brigade

1 Signal Brigade



1 (UK) Signal Brigade consists of four major units - 7 Signal Regiment, 16 Signal Regiment, 22 Signal Regiment and Support Battalion HQ ARRC. Additionally, The Brigade commands 12 Signal Group, a TA contingent consisting of 33 Signal Regiment (V), 34 Signal Regiment (V) and 35 Signal Regiment (V). They collectively provide command support allowing COMARRC and his staff to exercise command and control over the Corps, Land Component or Joint Force Land Component.

This role involves supporting the Forward Liaison and Reconnaissance Group (FLRG) and advance parties; the delivery of HQ ARRC’s deployable Command Posts (CPs); the establishment of a composite communications network that allows the passage of information between HQ ARRC’s CPs down to those subordinate formations; and the provision of life support: deploying, moving, feeding, accommodating, administering and protecting the staff of HQ ARRC. At each of the ARRC’s CPs, a close support signal squadron from one of the Brigade’s signal regiments works together with a squadron from Support Battalion.



1 signal brigade




1 signal brigade

7 Signal Regiment, is the Brigade’s largest unit and is based in Javelin Barracks at Elmpt, Germany. The Regiment is responsible for the provision of information and communication services (ICS) to staff at HQ ARCC’s Main, secondary and Tactical CPs.

Additionally 7 Signal Regiment delivers smaller, but extremely capable packages of communications capability known as "Digital Detachments” or "Points of Presence” (POP). These are deployed to the Headquarters of subordinate formations and provide a range of ICS that allows COMARRC and his staff to communicate and exchange information with subordinate commanders and staff. Another key task is the provision of reccepacks used by the FLRG.






16 Signal Regiment also based in Javelin Barracks is responsible for the configuration and management of all wide-area communications and information systems (CIS) across ARRC’s area of operations. The Regiment 1st UK Signal Brigade also has a close support role; delivering ICS to HQ ARRC RSC. 16 Signal Regiment also provides a squadron of Digital Detachments and a squadron designated to the digitization of HQ ARRC. The Regiment leads with all areas of the integration of new equipment and software packages within HQ ARRC.

1 signal brigade

22 Signal Regiment is the newest regiment within the brigade and is based in Stafford. Earmarked to be the brigade lead regiment for Project FALCON, the Regiment currently provides Wide Area Communications using Ptarmigan in support of 3 (UK) Division and 16 Air Assault Brigade.

Support Battalion HQ ARRC, is based in Rheindahlen and provides life support, administration and logistic support to HQ ARRC. The Battalion’s soldiers are qualified in over 28 trades and wear over 20 different cap badges.

The Battalion fields a wide range of vehicles, including heavy transport vehicles, staff vehicles, fuel carrying vehicles, motorcycles and mechanical handling equipment. In addition to providing the life support to HQ ARRC’ staff, the Battalion also provides defence and security at the ARRC’s CPs, utilising a full infantry scale of support weapons. It also provides artisan support in the form of plant operators, bricklayers, plumbers and carpenters. In barracks, the Battalion conducts individual military and special-to-theatre training for its own soldiers and HQ ARRC Staff and its welfare centre looks after the HQ ARRC and 1 Signal Brigade families.

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http://www.army.mod.uk/structure/16717.aspx



104 Logistic Support Brigade

port & maritime capability

104 Logistic Support Brigade is responsible for enabling operational theatres; as they open and then on an enduring basis thereafter as required.

The Brigade wholly commands Land Force's logistic enabling capabilities: Postal and Courier Services, Movement Control, Air Despatch, Port and Maritime (which includes a Vehicle Specialist and Railway capability) and many Pioneer effects. 

In addition the Brigade delivers a Military Working Dogs capability; commanding a Military Working Dogs Support Squadron (one of 5 - the others being 101 and 102 Logistic Brigades). The force elements that provide these capabilities are Joint enablers as they enable and support all deployed components.

With these capabilities, the Brigade activates strategic and operational Lines of Communications; mounting and deploying forces that provide specialist logistic support effects in support of joint expeditionary and enduring operations.

The Brigade Headquarters provides operational command to 5 Regular and 4 Territorial Army (TA) units; of which 8 are Royal Logistic Corps (RLC) and 1 is Royal Army Veterinary Corps (RAVC). 

The TA units are grouped under 2 Logistic Support Group RLC(V), which is commanded by an RLC TA Colonel.  Training and force preparation is collaborative between the Regular and TA; as we are 'One Army'.

Over and above deploying forces to enable and support world-wide operations and overseas training exercises, the Brigade operates both the Sea Mounting Centre (SMC) at the military port of Marchwood and the Joint Air Mounting Centre (JAMC) at South Cerney; ensuring that the UK end of deployments are fully enabled and effective at all times.



The headquarters itself is deployable in the Force Support command and control role.

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http://www.army.mod.uk/signals/organisation/7043.aspx
7th Armoured Brigade Headquarters and Signal Squadron (207)

207 sig sqn soldiers optag7th Armoured Brigade Headquarters and Signal Squadron (207) has a long and distinguished connection with the most famous brigade in the British Army, the Desert Rats.

The Signal Squadron provides command and control communications for 7th Armoured Brigade Headquarters.

Since the Second World War the Squadron has returned to the desert three times, in 1991, 2003 and 2005.

The Squadron, with its Brigade, are the first fully digitized formation to deploy on operations (in Iraq) with the BOWMAN communication system.http://www.army.mod.uk/images/images-microsites/royalsignallers/rsigs_207sigsqn_history.jpg

The Squadron is based in Hohne, the most eastern British garrison in Germany, a superb location with excellent facilities.

At the close of this latest operational tour, the Squadron will reform in Germany to undergo an intensive training package to rekindle its warfighting prowess.


7th Armoured Brigade is arguably the most famous and distinguished brigade in the British Army with an impressive history.

It was formed in February 1940 and was part of 7th Armoured Division in Egypt. The Brigade and its Signal Squadron fought the first two years of the Desert Campaign from Sidi Barrani and Beda Fouum, taking part in Operation BATTLEAXE in June 1941 and Operation CRUSADER later the same year.

The Brigade also saw action in Burma, India and Syria before returning to Europe and fighting Northwards through Italy towards Rome.

With various changes in title, the Brigade and its Signal Squadron have been based in Germany since WWII, firstly in Soltau and latterly in Bergen-Hohne.

The Brigade deployed to the Gulf in October 1990 on Operation GRANBY and subsequently took part in Operation DESERT SABRE resulting in the liberation of Kuwait.

The Brigade also took part in Operation TELIC in early 2003 resulting in the liberation of Iraq. Since early 2004 the Brigade has commenced conversion to the BOWMAN communications system; the first armoured brigade to do so.

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http://www.army.mod.uk/structure/9958.aspx



4th Mechanized Brigade

convoy security

4th Mechanized Brigade handed over command of Task Force Helmand to 16 Air Assault Brigade in October 2010 having replaced 11 Light Brigade as the lead formation of British forces in Afghanistan, in April 2009.

The 4th Armoured Brigade was formed as part of the Mobile Division Egypt in response to the Munich crisis of 1938. The Division formation changed name in 1940 to the 7th Armoured Division maintaining both heavy and light armoured brigades.

This division, the original Desert Rats, consisted of the 7th Armoured Brigade (previously the Light Armoured Brigade consisting of light mobile Armoured Cars) and 4th Armoured Brigade (the Heavy Armoured Brigade consisting of heavily armoured Cruiser tanks) which at this time consisted of the 1st and 6th RTR under the command of Brigadier J A L Caunter DSO MC.

4th Mechanized Brigade, or the 'The Black Rats', is now based in Catterick, North Yorkshire after moving from their previous home in Germany. 4th Mechanized Brigade is commanded by Brigadier Robert B Bruce.

Op HERRICK 12

During Operation HERRICK 12, 4 Mechanized Brigade built upon the work achieved by 11 Light Brigade alongside our US counterparts in Helmand province. Following its six months in charge, the brigade handed over responsibility for Task Force Helmand to 16 Air Assault Brigade, on 10 October 2010.

Task Force Helmand is predominantly British, although Danish, Estonian and Australian soldiers form a valued multinational element of the Task Force, which forms part of (ISAF) - currently commanded by General David Petraeus and consisting of approx. 119,500 troops from 46 nations.

http://royalnavy.mod.uk/royalmarines/units-and-deployments/other-royal-marine-units/1-assault-group-royal-marines/index.htm

1 Assault Group Royal Marines (1AGRM) are Britain’s premier experts on Amphibious Warfare.  The group comprises of the Headquarters in Plymouth, 10 Landing Craft Training Squadron in Poole, 11 Amphibious trials and training in Instow and the Royal Navy School of Board and Search, HMS Raleigh.  The organisation is tasked with training and parenting the Assault Squadrons of the Royal Marines (ASRM) and their Landing Craft detachments.  These ASRM provide the Landing Craft and fighting capability for the Royal Navy’s Amphibious Capital Ships (HMS Ocean, the Albion class Landing Platform Dock) and 539 Assault Squadron Royal Marines, the organic ASRM within 3 Commando Brigade RM.  As part of the Devonport Landing Craft co-location project, the 1AGRM HQ element moved from Poole to Devonport, Plymouth in December 2008, with 10 Landing Craft Training Squadron expected to follow in approximately four years time.

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http://www.whodareswins.com/british-army-formation-structure-setup.html

The structure of the British Army is complex, due to the different origins of its various constituent parts. It is broadly split into the Regular Army (full-time soldiers and units) and the Territorial Army (part-time soldiers and units).

In terms of its military structure, it has two parallel organisations, one administrative and one operational.

Administrative


  • Divisions administrating all military units, both Regular and TA, within a geographical area (e.g., 5 Div. based in Shrewsbury).

    • Brigade in a non fighting capacity (e.g., 43 (Wessex) Brigade based in Bulford).

Operational


The major operational command is Headquarters Land Forces (incorporating Land Command and Headquarters Adjutant General).

Corps made up of two or more divisions (now unlikely to be deployed as a purely national formation due to the size of the British Army); e.g., the ARRC.



  • Division made up of two or three brigades with an HQ element and support troops. Commanded by a Major-general.

    • Brigade made up of between three and five battalions, an HQ element and associated support troops. Commanded by a Brigadier.

      • Battalion of about 700 soldiers, made up of five companies commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel, or

      • Battlegroup. This is a mixed formation of armour, infantry, artillery, engineers and support units, and its structure is task specific. It is formed around the core of either an armoured regiment or infantry battalion, and has other units added or removed from it as necessary. A battlegroup will typically consist of between 600 and 700 soldiers under the command of a Lieutenant Colonel.

        • Company of about 100 soldiers, typically in three platoons, commanded by a Major.

          • Platoon of about 30 soldiers, commanded by a Second Lieutenant, Lieutenant or, for specialist platoons such as recce or anti-tank, a Captain.

            • Section of about 8 to 10 soldiers, commanded by a Corporal.

A number of elements of the British Army use alternative terms for battalion, company and platoon. These include the Royal Armoured Corps, Corps of Royal Engineers, Royal Logistic Corps, and the Royal Corps of Signals who use regiment (battalion), squadron (company) and troop (platoon). The Royal Artillery are unique in using the term regiment in place of both corps andbattalion, they also replace company with battery and platoon with troop.

Divisions


The British Army currently has 6 divisions with two (1st Armoured Division and 3rd Infantry Division) being deployable.

Name

Headquarters

Subunits

1ukdiv.gif 1st Armoured Division

Herford, Germany

3 Armoured or Mechanised Brigades.

 2nd Infantry Division

Craigiehall, near Edinburgh

Four regional brigades.

 3rd Infantry Division

Bulford, Salisbury

Two mechanized brigades, one light brigade and one infantry brigade.

british 4th infantry division insignia (new).png 4th Infantry Division

Aldershot

Three regional brigades.

 5th Infantry Division

Shrewsbury

Three regional brigades, one air assault brigade and Colchester Garrison.

sixdivlogo.png 6th Infantry Division

York

Deployable divisional HQ. Created to support the UK's rotational command of HQ Regional Command (South).

Aviation components


The British Army operates alongside the Royal Air Force as part of a Joint Force, but the army also has its own Army Air Corps.

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http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/royalmarines/units-and-deployments/other-royal-marine-units/1-assault-group-royal-marines/news/rfa_mounts_bay_amphi.htm

RFA Mounts Bay Amphibious Operations Cell


a coy, 40 commando embarking on a ch47 in plymouth sound

6th Apr 2011

A Coy, 40 Commando embarking on a CH47 in Plymouth Sound

As part of Exercise SOUTH WEST DAGGER, RFA Mounts Bay provided amphibious support to HMS Albion during the latter ships work up package for high readiness operational tasking overseas.

The Bay Class Royal Fleet Auxiliary ships are an extremely capable asset, used for carrying large quantities of fighting forces, vehicles, ammunition and stores over long distances, working alongside other Royal Navy shipping as part of a wider Amphibious Task Group.

Before any major exercise or deployment, an Amphibious Operations Cell will embark on a Bay Class RFA to provide the vital link between the RFA crew, embarked military force and the Royal Navy command platform. This small team enable the command and control function, allowing the RFA to support complex and concurrent amphibious serials using the numerous landing craft and aviation assets contained within the Task Group.

For SOUTH WEST DAGGER, the Amphibious Operations Cell was formed from 1 Assault Group Royal Marines, commanded by an Amphibious Operations Officer. Royal Navy Reserve watch-keepers, Royal Marine signallers, dock control officers and assault guides added to the capability of the team, whilst specialist staff from 17 Port & Maritime Regiment assisted with the requirement for manoeuvring different types of vehicles onto the variety of landing craft.

A Coy from 40 Commando Royal Marines joined Mounts Bay as the Embarked Military Force and were trained in assault drills for operating with both landing craft and aviation. As the exercise progressed, A Coy put these skills into practice, conducting a number of troop level surface raids using small craft in the Plymouth area, and an aviation assault with CH47 into Dartmoor. The exercise culminated in a company level assault, following overnight insertion by landing craft from 6 Assault Squadron Royal Marines.

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3 Commando Brigade Take Command Of Task Force Helmand


the flag of 3 commando brigade is raised in lashkar gah to mark the transfer of authority of task force helmand from 16 air assault brigade [picture: sergeant russ nolan, crown copyright/mod 2011]

brigadier james chiswell (right) of 16 air assault brigade hands over command of task force helmand to brigadier ed davis rm of 3 commando brigade in lashkar gah [picture: sergeant russ nolan, crown copyright/mod 2011]

12 Apr 2011

On Saturday 9 April, 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines took command of Task Force Helmand in Afghanistan, officially marking the start of Operation HERRICK 14.

In a short ceremony at the headquarters of Task Force Helmand in Lashkar Gah, Brigadier James Chiswell, Commander of 16 Air Assault Brigade, formally handed over to Brigadier Ed Davis RM, Commander of 3 Commando Brigade.

Over the next six months, 3 Commando Brigade will look to build upon the achievements made by 16 Air Assault Brigade since they arrived in Helmand in October 2010.

Brigadier Chiswell said it had been a significant tour:



"We have continued to strengthen relations with our Afghan partners in the army, police and Helmand provincial government. This has enabled us, alongside our ISAF coalition partners, to build up their capacity to provide security and protect the local people from the insurgents."

"Alongside the Provincial Reconstruction Team, we have continued to stabilise insecure areas, and the men and women of 16 Air Assault Brigade - some of who have made the ultimate sacrifice - and their families can be proud of the immense contribution they have made to improve the lives of the Afghan people."

Brigadier Davis said:



"Over the last six months, Brigadier Chiswell and 16 Air Assault Brigade have made tangible progress throughout their area of operations."

"Our main objective is to continue to build on their success and move closer to setting the conditions for the transfer of security authority from ISAF to the Afghan National Army and Police."

"We appreciate it is no easy task. There will continue to be tough fighting this summer as we consolidate gains and help facilitate the spread of governance to more towns and villages. However, I am confident that our excellent training has prepared us for the challenge that lies ahead."

The transfer of authority ceremony was also attended by the head of the Helmand Provincial Reconstruction Team, Michael O'Neill, and the Commander of Regional Command (South West), Major General John A Toolan Jr.

Six-and-a-half-thousand personnel from the Army, Navy and Royal Air Force make up Task Force Helmand (TFH) and 3 Commando Brigade will be the lead formation in TFH until October 2011.

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Military invasion to remove Libya's Gaddafi 'not occupying forces' - French general

http://en.rian.ru/world/20110421/163626792.html

 

09:51 21/04/2011



NATO forces operating in Libya may at any time send troops in to arrest Muammar Gaddafi without breaching the UN Security Council's resolution, former UN mission in Lebanon (UNIFIL) Force Commander Major-General Alain Pellegrini said on Thursday.

On Tuesday, Britain, followed by France and Italy on Wednesday, announced they were sending military consultants to Benghazi in eastern Libya to give support to the rebels. Paris, however, has ruled out sending military ground forces into Libya and will not seek permission from the UN Security Council to do that.

"If a decision on future [military ground] measures is actually made, then, in my opinion, the wording of [a ground force invasion] can be eluded," French Gen. Pellegrini told RIA Novosti in an interview, adding: "If we are talking about ground troops being sent into Libya, and they conduct a short-term operation [to remove Gaddafi] in Tripoli and then quickly leave, then that is not considered 'occupying forces.'"

The UN Security Council adopted a resolution imposing a no-fly zone over Libya on March 17, paving the way for a military operation against Gaddafi which began two days later. The command of the operation was shifted from a U.S.-led international coalition to NATO in late March.

Despite dozens of sorties carried out by NATO aircraft against Gaddafi's forces, government troops have maintained their combat capability and continue to pound the poorly-equipped rebels with heavy artillery and rocket fire.

The Libyan National Transitional Council's foreign relations department head, Ali al-Assaoui, said earlier that the rebels need military aid and weapons and did not rule out that "Arab, Muslim, and friendly forces on Libyan soil" may be needed to rout out Gaddafi.

Gen. Pellegrini said that Gaddafi, as the leader of an Arab country, should step down himself so that NATO does not spoil its relations with other Arab countries.

"He needs to be forced to step down through talks and contacts. If ground operations begin in Tripoli, then members of the Arab League will definitely say there is aggression from the coalition forces or from NATO members," Gen. Pellegrini said.

Should a military decision be used to solve the problem, he said, the danger of the country splitting in two will prevail; therefore, allied forces need to know what they are getting into.

"In order to begin an operation, you need to know where to go and who to place in power. Do we start [a military operation] for those who represent only part of the population, or do we do it for the entire country?" he said.

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http://www.isaf.nato.int/troop-numbers-and-contributions/italy/index.php


Italy

map of italy

Italy 

Recognized as TCN since:

24 July 2003

Current Troop Contribution:

3815

Presence in Afghanistan

Regional Command West: Herat

Regional Command Capital



OMLT contribution

8

POMLT contribution

3

PRT 

Lead: Herat 

Other significant NATO-ISAF contributions

ANA Trust Fund (since 2007)

€4,100,000

NATO Equipment Donation Programme

0

Post Operation Emergency Relief Fund (POERF)

€300,000

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http://www.isaf.nato.int/troop-numbers-and-contributions/france/index.php


France

map of france

France 

Recognized as TCN since:

24 July 2003

Current Troop Contribution:

3979

Presence in Afghanistan

Regional Command Capital (Rotational Command)

Regional Command East: Kapisa, Surobi


Regional Command South: Kandahar Airfield (Mirages), Uruzgan (OMLT)

Regional Command North: Police Trainers



OMLT contribution

7

POMLT contribution

5

PRT 

 

Other significant NATO-ISAF contributions

ANA Trust Fund (since 2007)

0

NATO Equipment Donation Programme

Personal equipment

Post Operation Emergency Relief Fund (POERF)

0

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http://www.isaf.nato.int/troop-numbers-and-contributions/united-kingdom/index.php


United Kingdom

map of united kingdom

United Kingdom   

Recognized as TCN since:

24 July 2003

Current Troop Contribution:

9500

Presence in Afghanistan

Regional Command Capital

Regional Command Southwest: Helmand

Regional Command South


OMLT contribution

7

POMLT contribution

6

PRT 

Lead: Lashkar Gah

Other significant NATO-ISAF contributions

ANA Trust Fund (since 2007)

€4,540,006

NATO Equipment Donation Programme

0

Post Operation Emergency Relief Fund (POERF)

0

 

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Ivory Coast Forces

http://www.defense.gouv.fr/operations/cote-d-ivoire/dossier/les-forces-francaises-en-cote-d-ivoire

Updated: 01/04/2011

Since 1 June 2010, the Licorne force under the command of Brigadier General Jean-Pierre Palasset (Force Commander).


Licorne


The Licorne force has about 900 troops. June 2009 saw the creation of the battalion Unicorn (BATLIC), fusion of the task force Licorne and the Joint Support Base (OFIS).

The Licorne force is now grouped in Abidjan.It is the only entity French military in Ivory Coast. This redeployment is consistent with the format "Unicorn 900" announced by Prime Minister Francois Fillon, 28 January 2009 during the parliamentary debate on the French overseas operations.



The force can be locally supported by a building of the Navy's mission highbush in the Gulf of Guinea with on board an operational reserve board. This reserve is being provided by theFrench Forces of Cape Verde (FFCV) . 

Since the adoption of resolution 1721 (November 1, 2006), reinforced by Resolution 1975 of March 30, 2011, and in accordance with the Ouagadougou political agreement (signed March 4, 2007), the primary mission of the Licorne force is to support UNOCI: the French force is a force capable of acting on behalf of the UN force, the latter speaking in support of the action of the Ivorian armed forces. Unicorn may also, if necessary, to ensure the security of French nationals and foreigners. Since February 2011, the Licorne force has been strengthened and in 1100 men.


UNOCI


The strength of UNOCI, commanded by Major General Abdul Hafiz, has about 8,000 men.Some twenty French soldiers are inserted or serve as liaison officers.

This force was created by Resolution 1528 adopted by the Security Council of UN Feb. 27, 2004. It is deployed in the theater Ivory Coast since October 2004. Its mission is to observe and monitor the implementation of global ceasefire on 3 May 2003 to assist the Government of National Reconciliation, to implement the plan DDR (Disarmament, Demobilization, Reintegration), to support the implementation of peace process, to monitor the embargo and to support the organization of elections.

 The UN resolutions  

Several resolutions are the framework of international military intervention in Cote d'Ivoire.The first resolution (1464) of 4 February 2003 was particularly endorsed the Linas-Marcoussis Agreement, signed January 24, 2003. Resolution 1528 of 27 February 2004, established the United Nations Operation in Côte d'Ivoire (UNOCI).

The current terms of the impartial forces, namely the UNOCI and Licorne force that supports it, are set by resolution 1739 of January 10, 2007. They were respectively extended on a regular basis since that date and run until 30 June 2011 (resolution 1962 Security Council United Nations dated 20 December 2010). They were reaffirmed March 30, 2011 by a vote of resolution 1975.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-155593/SAS-1-500-troops-war-terror.html#ixzz1KHNsaREu


SAS to get 1,500 more troops for the war on terror


by CHRISTOPHER LEAKE, Mail on Sunday

The number of SAS soldiers is to quadruple from 500 to 2,000 over the next five years in a massive escalation of the war on terror.

With Britain playing a key role in the efforts to hunt down Al Qaeda terrorists, Special Forces are already stretched to the limit.

But there were fears in the SAS last night that the rigorous entry requirements will be watered down to ensure there are enough recruits.

Men from the Special Air Service are currently on operations in the Middle East, Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Macedonia plus a number of other secret locations around the world.

More than 200 troops were due to arrive in the Gulf this weekend to spearhead a 1,000-strong multi-national task group of Special Forces soldiers preparing to go deep inside Iraq and hunt down Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction.

Along with the Special Boat Service and members of the Army's 14 Intelligence Corps, the SAS is also working closely with the security services on domestic anti-terrorist operations.

However, such is the manpower shortage in the SAS - motto, Who Dares Wins - that elements of the Territorial Army are also being utilised. Under the command of the SAS, the TA soldiers would carry out a home defence role by guarding key installations.

Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon hinted briefly in the Commons last October at the enlargement of 'selected Forces'.

But it is only now that senior military sources have revealed the SAS is unable to cope with its widening role because of a manpower crisis.

Military insiders say the plan to expand the SAS is part of a 20-year strategy to fight what experts believe will be a long and uncompromising war against terrorists.

A source said: 'We simply haven't got enough Special Forces personnel.'

In order to cut costs, the Director of the Special Forces wants to train SAS and 14 Intelligence Corps hopefuls alongside each other, with the best getting into the SAS.

But an SAS insider said: 'Only four or five guys out of 180 on each course are good enough to pass the tough physical and mental tests for the SAS.

'Up to 60 per cent of the men who do the 14 Intel course have already failed SAS selection. So now they're being given another chance and the danger is the course will be diluted to let some more in.'

Meanwhile, the role of the SAS in preparations for a new war against Saddam emerged last night. The men, from A Squadron, 22 SAS, will link up with Special Forces troops from the US, France and Australia to pinpoint and blow up hidden Iraqi Scud missile sites near the borders with Jordan and Syria.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-155593/SAS-1-500-troops-war-terror.html#ixzz1KHNsaREu


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