Study Questions for apush summer Assignment 2014



Download 1.1 Mb.
Date conversion21.02.2016
Size1.1 Mb.

Study Questions for APUSH Summer Assignment 2014


Ten Days that Unexpectedly Changed America (Gillon)
Note to students:

The following pages include a list of important events and discussion questions to assist you with the summer reading. You are to complete each area of the chapter study guides (identify, chronological order, and discussion questions) and keep originals in a spiral notebook. Discussion questions are to be answered in short answer style in complete sentences. All discussion question responses are to be emailed to me no later than Monday, August 11, 2014 at greg.cress@polk-fl.net.

Since these are all events, themes, and issues we’ll examine in greater depth – with much more to add to this! – it might be a good idea to start making flashcards and/or form study groups to compare thoughts on the questions. If you have trouble or any concerns, email me at greg.cress@polk-fl.net and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can. Have a great summer!

Mr. Cress


Chapter 1 Massacre at Mystic



Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


Bradford, William “City on the Hill”

Massachusetts Bay Colony

Metacom Pequots Puritans

Smallpox wampum Winthrop, John





Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
Arabella arrives Indian Removal Act King Philip’s War Mayflower arrives Pequot War

Discussion Questions:





  1. Why were the Pequots the focus of Puritan anger in the 1630s? (why not other tribes? who was the opposition before/after the 1630s?)




  1. What were the Puritans’ justifications for conflict with Natives (hint: spiritual and secular)? Which was more influential on Puritan actions, and why?




  1. Gillon writes, “The Pequot War set up the tragic irony of American history: a nation founded on the highest ideals of individual liberty and freedom was built on slaughter and destruction of epic proportions.” (19) Assess the validity of this statement. (“Assess the validity” is a common phrase used in APUSH prompts. It’s asking you to judge the accuracy of the statement, which in this case is essentially an agree/disagree situation. Which side you take is less important than what sort of facts and reasoning you can provide to support your stance.)




  1. On page 25, Gillon claims that the colonial conflicts between Natives and Europeans were the beginning of a pattern of mythological quests for American domination. Whether or not you agree with the latter, what other events/episodes/issues in American history also represent an “us versus them” mindset?

In other words, can we apply Gillon’s statements to other incidents/people/eras? “the triumph of light over darkness…”

“by demonizing the ...”

“Americans drew sharp distinctions between themselves and ...”


Chapter 2 Shays Rebellion




Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


Anti-Federalists

Articles of Confederation democracy

Federalists Madison, James post-war depression

Shays, Daniel



The Federalist



Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
Bill of Rights

Constitutional Convention (Philadelphia) Shays’ Rebellion

Treaty of Paris (ending Revolutionary War)

Discussion Questions:





  1. Which aspects (i.e., weaknesses) of the Articles of Confederation increased the chances of domestic protest?


  1. How was the American Revolution viewed differently by the supporters and the opponents of Shays’ Rebellion?


  1. Explain how farmer protests were a political threat to the new American government. Do you think Governor Bowdoin’s responses were appropriate? Why or why not?


  1. Gillon writes, “Fear of government had shaped the creation of the Articles of Confederation; fear of democracy defined the discussion of the new constitution.” (p. 48) How did the U.S. become more conservative following Shays’ Rebellion?


  1. Should “Shaysites” be commemorated and/or memorialized today? What are the arguments for and against this?

Chapter 3 The Gold Rush



Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


Sutter, John Marshall, James Brannan, Sam

Oregon-California Trail Manifest Destiny Californios

“foreign miners’ tax” Wilmot Proviso




Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
‘49ers go west Chinese Exclusion Act Civil War

Compromise of 1850/Fugitive Slave Act gold discovered at Sutter’s Mill

Transcontinental railroad

completed Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo




Discussion Questions:





  1. How did the Gold Rush help fulfill the notions of Manifest Destiny?


  1. What were the similarities/differences of the social and cultural make-up of the West compared to the more established eastern U.S.?


  1. What were the political consequences of the Gold Rush in the 1850s? How did it accelerate the division of the nation?


  1. What were the long-term economic consequences of the Gold Rush? (hint: think about transportation, communication, industries, etc.)


  1. Who were the winners and losers in the Gold Rush? (who benefited? who didn’t? why?)

Chapter 4 The Battle of Antietam



Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments border states

Grant, Ulysses S.


Lee, Robert E. McClellan, George total war
War of attrition



Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
First Battle of Bull Run Battle of Antietam Emancipation Proclamation Appomattox Courthouse


Discussion Questions:





  1. What factors made the Battle of Antietam the bloodiest day in American history?


  1. In strategic terms (casualties, land occupied, size of remaining forces, etc.) Antietam should probably be considered more of a draw than a victory for either side. So how/why did Lincoln choose to view it as a Union victory?


  1. How was Great Britain a threat to the U.S. during the Civil War?


  1. Was the Emancipation Proclamation more intended to end slavery or end the war? Explain your selection.


  1. Gillon describes one major consequence of the Civil War to have been the enlarged power of the federal government, which advanced individual freedoms after the war through the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments. In today’s political conversations, however, we often hear references to the federal government denying people’s freedoms (e.g., high taxes, Obamacare, privacy issues, etc.). Which of these are Lincoln’s greater legacy – the expansion of federal power or the protection of individual freedoms?

Chapter 5 The Homestead Strike



Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


Carnegie, Andrew Cleveland, Grover Frick, Henry Clay

“Ironclad” contract Pinkertons

Scientific management

Second Industrial Revolution





Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
Bessemer process

Coxey’s March/Pullman Strike first national strike (railway)

Homestead Strike

Discussion Questions:





  1. How were workers in the late 19th century unified? How were they divided?


  1. What factors caused labor unions to gain power in the late 19th century? What factors caused them to lose power in this era?


  1. What was the main cause of the failure of the Homestead Strike?



  1. How did economic tensions in the late 19th century cause political changes? (hint: in the early 19th century, the “common man” feared the power of the federal government)

Chapter 6 Murder at the Fair…



Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


“Bully pulpit”

“good” and “bad” trusts Hanna, Mark

McKinley, William Progressives Roosevelt Corollary

Roosevelt, Teddy (TR) Square Deal





Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
Anthracite Coal Strike (PA) Assassination of McKinley Northern Securities case Spanish-American War

TR’s Progressive Party campaign



Discussion Questions:





  1. What were the main differences between the “Progressives” (the broader political movement, encompassing Republicans and Democrats alike) and McKinley’s traditional priorities?




  1. TR’s “trust busting” was his way of preserving capitalism and discouraging radical ideologies in the U.S. Cite two specific examples of Roosevelt’s approach, and explain how each demonstrated his concept of the President as “a steward of the people.”




  1. In the early years of the nation, a strong federal government was considered a threat to the rights and freedoms of the “common man” (a vestige of the Revolutionary era). How did TR alter this view of government as it relates to the interests of the masses?




  1. Does TR’s image belong on Mt. Rushmore (one of only four)? Defend your position. Is there anyone you feel is better qualified to be depicted alongside Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln?

Chapter 7 Scopes




Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


ACLU

Bryan, William Jennings Christian fundamentalism

“culture war” Darrow, Clarence Mencken, H.L.

televangelists





Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
1920 Census Butler Act

Darwin’s Origin of the Species

Prohibition begins Scopes Trial

Discussion Questions:





  1. How did mass media (radio, theater, newspapers, etc.) produce a national culture in the 1920s? What were the pros and cons of this?




  1. The 19th Amendment ensured women’s right to vote in 1920. What other developments in the 1920s helped create a “modern” – untraditional – image for women?




  1. Besides teaching creationism in schools, what other issues did traditionalists promote in the 1920s?




  1. The contemporary “culture war” is no longer divided along a rural-urban axis, but does embody the struggle between faith-based and secular interests. Other than the creationism/evolution debate, which issue do you feel is the most contentious in our time? How does history suggest this will be ultimately resolved?

Chapter 8 Einstein’s Letter




Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


“military-industrial complex” MAD

Manhattan Project

nuclear fission Oppenheimer, J. Robert Roosevelt, Franklin D.

Szilard, Leo Truman, Harry





Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
Bombings of Hiroshima/Nagasaki Germany invades Poland

Pearl Harbor attacked

Nuclear test at Alamogordo, NM USSR detonates atomic bomb

Discussion Questions:





    1. Why was atomic research politically unpopular in the early years of WWII?




    1. What were the primary arguments for and against the use of the atomic bomb?




    1. For decades before 1945, American foreign policy wavered between isolationism and assertive international action. As Gillon writes, that all changed as the U.S. was forced to “abandon its instinctive isolationism and assume the responsibilities of a global superpower” (196). Explain this concept.




    1. The atomic bomb did more than initiate the Cold War. Identify political, economic, and social effects on the United States (domestically) during the atomic age.




    1. To what extent was Eisenhower right about the “military-industrial complex”? Has this threat disappeared now that the Cold War is over?

Chapter 9 When America Was Rocked




Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


Sullivan, Ed “race music”

Presley, Elvis Freed, Alan





Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
American Bandstand begins national broadcasts

Brown v. Board of Education

Elvis first appears on national TV McDonald’s opens first restaurant



Discussion Questions:





  1. How was the Cold War a contributing cause to the widespread social conformity of the 1950s?




  1. Gillon writes that Elvis Presley’s talent was insufficient to attain such popularity: “It was the synthesis of black blues and white country music, the mixing of a white face and poor black music, that made him so unique and so threatening.” Explain this statement.




  1. Why was it ironic that television would be such an important medium for the spread of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950s?




  1. Rank the following factors in terms of their effect on the emergence of the “youth culture” of the 1950s. Support your response with at least three specific examples.

economic prosperity (e.g., higher average income) television

race music (aka, rock ‘n’ roll)

Cold War

Chapter 10 Freedom Summer




Identify: Define/explain the significance of each of the terms, people, etc.


Moses, Robert CORE

SNCC


Johnson, Lyndon B. Killen, Edgar Ray literacy tests/poll taxes

Hoover, J. Edgar





Chronology: Put the following events in the correct order. Years, per se, are less important than the order in which they occurred. Then, explain how each event is linked (cause/effect) to the one that follows.
Brown v. Board of Education

Civil Rights Act Freedom Riders

Freedom Summer

Greensboro Sit-in’s Voting Rights Act



Discussion Questions:





    1. Explain why Mississippi was a particular challenge for civil rights reformers.




    1. How did political interests delay the implementation of desegregation?




    1. How and why did the Civil Rights Movement change after Freedom Summer?




    1. Rank the following factors in terms of their effect on the social changes of the Civil Rights Movement.

Support your response with at least three specific examples.
citizen-based efforts government action the media


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page