Studies of Society and Environment Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes



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Time Continuity and Change


Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes.

The following elaborations are examples only of what students know and can do, and should not be considered prescriptive or exhaustive.
Key concept: Heritage

Key process: Reflecting





Level 5

Level 5

Level 6

Level 6

Learning outcome

Core TCC 5.5

Students identify values inherent in historical sources to reveal who benefits or is disadvantaged by particular heritages.



Geography TCC 5.4

Students construct a log of data to record the sequence of occupancy of an Australian rural or urban centre based on primary sources including aerial photos, pastoral records, museum relics or headstones in graveyards.



Core TCC 6.5

Students develop criteria-based judgments about the ethical behaviour of people in the past.



Geography TCC 6.4

Students understand changing characteristics in land use patterns relative to physical, social and economic factors.



Students know:
Heritage

social and environmental heritage

experience of advantage or disadvantage and

farming

indigenous communities



inner urban areas

migrant populations

Australian waterways

access to technology

endangered wildlife species

as revealed in

government policies on e.g. trade, land clearing, dam building, Telstra, etc

international agreements

socio-economic indicators


sequence of occupancy of Australian rural/ urban centre

consider the role of physical features in determining landuse patterns e.g. water channels, particular soil types, hills (possibly for defence/flooding reasons)

which physical features were beneficial/prohibitive, depending upon particular historical circumstances

primary sources

aerial photos

pastoral records

museum relics

headstones in graveyards

oral histories (living)



ethical behaviour of people in the past

major ethical contributions in the past and influence on values relating to use of the environment e.g. Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Gary Snyder, and Arne Naess

practical contributions of environmental and conservation activists/groups e.g. David Suzuki, Richard Attenborough, Friends of the Earth, World Wide Fund for Nature, Greenpeace, Land Care groups, local catchment groups


land use patterns relating to physical, social and economic factors

physical changes which alter landuse patterns

severe flooding

bushfires

cyclones

tsunamis


social changes which alter landuse patterns

rapid increase/decrease in population

loss of essential services in area

economic changes which alter landuse patterns

global/national/local demand for goods

dramatic increase/decrease in economic value of certain goods e.g. fall in wool prices during the late 1980s led to increased diversification in some rural areas of Australia



Students can:
Reflect

identify values inherent in historical sources

evaluate resources for heritage values (photos, aerial photos, maps, sketches, local and other government records) using criteria eg social, economic, environmental

use a field study situation to investigate impacts of conflict over particular landuses on different groups of people both in a positive and negative way

use an example of one group to identify aspects of their heritage

roleplay a situation where groups reveal their different perspectives regarding the same heritage e.g. cotton farmers and conservationists re dam building


construct a log of data

compile a report, using primary data sources, which analyses why particular waves of occupants lived in a particular area, at a particular time



develop criteria-based judgments

determine the effectiveness of the efforts of chosen individuals/groups on the basis of specific criteria related to:

economic concerns

political concerns

social/cultural concerns


understand changing characteristics

through practical exercises, demonstrate an understanding of landuse patterns relative to physical, social and economic factors

outline the extent to which particular physical, social and economic factors are responsible for the changes which became apparent over time and how the variety of factors responsible were interrelated to one another

Place & Space


Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes.

The following elaborations are examples only of what students know and can do, and should not be considered prescriptive or exhaustive.
Key concept: Human-environment relationships

Key process: Investigating





Level 5

Level 5

Level 6

Level 6

Learning outcome

Core PS 5.1

Students synthesise information from the perspectives of different groups to identify patterns that constitute a region.



Geography PS 5.1

Students interact with, record and reflect on the view of local groups to develop an understanding of their relationship with the environment.



Core PS 6.1

Students use criteria and geographical skills to develop conclusions about the management of a place.



Geography PS 6.1

Students utilise geographical information systems to develop an understanding of the significance of some components within a system.



Students know:
Human-environment relationships

perspectives of different groups

perspectives

cultural

socio-economic

religious

environmental

political

different groups

indigenous

refugees


age

employment

residential

patterns which constitute a region

physical


geology

climate


soils

topography

flora and fauna

natural resources and world heritage

human

built: urban, agricultural, mining, industrial



social/cultural: population characteristics, political divisions, lifestyle, cultural identity, employment

local groups

some examples

Save our Riverfront Bushland

Brisbane Region Environmental Council

Bulimba Creek Protection Society

Bulimba Creek Catchment Co-ordinate Committee

Cloncurry LandCare

Channel LandCare Group

landCare

urban bushland

environmental

catchment committees



relationship between local group and environment

aims of the group

actions and main issues dealt with by the group


management of a place

positive management practices

ecologically sustainable development

conservation

preservation

protection

mismanagement

exploitation

unsustainable practices

excessive or misuse of resource

pollution

degradation

place

human (urban, industrial, farmland, political)



natural (catchments, forests, wetlands, coastal, marine)

systems

natural


fluvial

arid


coastal

glacial


volcanic

socio-economic

agricultural/farming (e.g. dairying, sugar cane, horticulture etc.)

industrial/manufacturing (e.g. coca cola, cannery, bakery etc.)

mining (e.g. sand)

political

electoral boundaries

components for the system

inputs – natural/human

processes

outputs


Students can:
Investigate

synthesise information to identify patterns

manipulate data relating to particular phenomena(‘overlays’) to identify patterns resulting from various combinations of factors such as socio-economic status, ethnicity or various physical phenomena e.g. soil type, drainage lines, climate

define a city by political boundaries, population demographics, zones for housing, business and industry

define a region by using Aboriginal language boundaries

identify a specific farming region using statistics of food production and soil, climate and vegetation data

identify relationships that may exist between voting patterns and unemployment levels to classify a region

classify an area within a current social, economic or political region e.g. ethnic groupings in a city; types of work and associated industries in a regional centre


interact with, record and reflect

using the internet to search the local groups to identify the aims and actions of these groups (examples of search terms: ‘community groups and Brisbane’; ‘LandCare and Queensland’)

based on this research, investigate the issues faced by the group or become involved by participating in the local groups’ actions

invite guest speakers from the local groups to outline the groups’ environmental aims and actions

report to the class on the success or otherwise of the group


use criteria and geographic skills to develop conclusions:

using the geographic inquiry process, investigate a local catchment area and use specific criteria (relating to environmental, social, economic, political factors) to determine which is the best management strategy from a number of possible options

apply geographical skills of observation, collection of primary data (e.g. water quality and macro-invertebrate study),graphical manipulation of data (e.g. pi-charts, bar graphs, climate graphs, simple topographical maps, cross-sections, aerial photography) to a study of management of a place and express conclusions


use GIS to assist in decision-making

decide on the information needed

obtain data for each piece of information

overlay the sets of data and map





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