Studies of Society and Environment Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes



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Time, Continuity and Change


Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes.

The following elaborations are examples only of what students know and can do, and should not be considered prescriptive or exhaustive.
Key concept: People and contributions

Key process: Participating





Level 5

Level 5

Level 6

Level 6

Learning outcome

Core TCC 5.3

Students collaborate to locate and systematically record information about the contributions of people in diverse settings.



Geography TCC 5.2

Students liaise with local council or community representatives to resolve an issue of significant change in the local community.



Core TCC 6.3

Students collaboratively identify the values underlying contributions by diverse individuals and groups in Australian or Asian environments.



Geography TCC 6.2

Students create a diagrammatic overview to indicate significant features and linkages in the process of urbanisation of a major Australian, Asian or European settlement.



Students know:

People and contributions

diversity of settings and contributions of people to them

hot/humid environments e.g. rainforest/pygmies

cold, polar regions e.g. Arctic/Inuits

arid, desert area e.g. inland Australia/Australian aborigines

mountainous areas e.g. Himalayas/Nepalese

areas subject to tectonic change e.g. volcanic area, earthquake prone areas/Hawaiians

built environment e.g. cities, farms, mines

political response to needs of remote communities



local council or community representatives

councillors

planners

engineers

environmental officers/Health officers

leaders of local lobby groups



issue of significant change in the local community

particular issues dependent upon local situation, but could include:

changes to available parkland in a suburban area

change to service provision in an area (e.g. loss/ gain of services)

change to distribution of natural environment in a chosen area

change to natural processes (e.g. sand deposition) in a chosen area etc.



diverse individuals/groups and contributions in Australian or Asian environments

democratic process

state and federal electoral commissions and redrawing of state/federal boundaries

development of independent status for East Timor and work of Xanana Gusmao

social Justice

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders/groups working to improve conditions for indigenous people in rural and urban centres e.g. Lois O’Donohue, Eddie Mabo, Noel Pearson, Cape York Land Council, ATSIC , Sen. Aiden Ridgeway

ecological and economic sustainability

Senator Bob Brown and Australian Greens Party

Greening Australia and Land Care

environmentalist activist groups e.g. WWF, WPSQ

economic ‘think tanks’ e.g. The Whitlam Institute/Centre for Independent Studies

peace


Major Peter Cosgrove and ‘Interfet’ troops in East Timor

significant features and linkages in the process of urbanisation

rural to urban migration

urban consolidation

models of urban settlement (Concentric Zone, Sector, Multiple-Nuclei)

urban renewal/gentrification

major Australian, Asian, European settlement

as well as the obvious state capitals and major cities of Europe and Asia, it may be constructive to consider what is occurring in your Geographically closest regional city



Students can:
Participate

work together to

locate and record information on one of the above groups

information could include location, topographic, climatic, lifestyle, work, cultural activities


liaise with local authorities and suggest resolution

students communicate with local authorities about an issue

suggest a resolution in reference to the issue


collaboratively identify values

participate as members of a team to investigate the contribution of a prominent figure/group and the values promoted



make diagrammatic overview of

rural/urban migration trends

models of urban settlements




Time Continuity and Change


Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes.

The following elaborations are examples only of what students know and can do, and should not be considered prescriptive or exhaustive.
Key Concept: Causes and effects

Key process: Communicating






Level 5

Level 5

Level 6

Level 6

Learning outcome

Core TCC 5.4

Students explain the consequences of Australia’s international relations on the development of a cohesive society.



Geography TCC 5.3

Students identify changes to the features of a rural place and an urban place and identify the difference and similarities in these changes.



Core TCC 6.4

Students produce a corroborated argument concerning causes of a change or continuity in environments, media or gender roles.



Geography TCC 6.3

Students carry out field studies to investigate a spatial change through time in a local community.



Students know:
Causes and effects

consequences of Australia’s international relations

international relations shaping Australia’s environment

humanitarian e.g. Ausaid, U N Commissions on Human Rights/Refugees

political e.g. ASEAN, UN, Commonwealth

economic e.g. WTO

military e.g. peace keeping in East Timor

environmental e.g. Kyoto Protocol, Ramsar, World Heritage

the development of a cohesive society and

environmental debate

globalisation

multiculturalism

reconciliation

trade agreements and their diverse impacts on primary and secondary industry

refugee support

changing demographic composition of Australia’s society

Aboriginal human rights issues



features of a rural place/urban place

site


situation

physical characteristics of land on which a settlement is established

cultural characteristics of a settlement.

differences and similarities

could be related to population characteristics, area of land affected, nature of service provision



differences and similarities in changes

differences and similarities could be related to the rates of change, the impacts of the change process on local populations, extent to which the change process was locally or externally imposed



causes of change or continuity in environments

physical

natural disasters e.g. cyclones, tsunamis, volcanoes, landslides, earthquakes

normal weathering and erosion processes e.g. action of running water, moving ice, aeolian(wind) action

cultural

large increase in population leading to increased pressure on urban fringes (in both developed and developing nations).

increased demand for particular resources (timber, coal, peat, water) e.g. overuse of Murray-Darling resource, pressure placed upon urban waterways as developers seek to satisfy increasing demand (&, in part, create demand)

change in spatial distribution of population e.g. caused by the drift from rural to urban areas (in both developed and developing nations).

provision of major infrastructure or service centre e.g. railway line between Adelaide and Darwin, construction of large shopping centre in a local community


spatial change through time

relevant changes could relate to an expansion or decline in the physical area of land utilised by a centre caused by:

demographic characteristics

expansion/decline of an industry

establishment of new industry

increased/decreased support by local council



Local community

street


block

suburb


town/city

Students can:
Communicate

explain consequences

debate an important international issue and how it has affected Australia e.g. ’Australia should do more to control e.g. greenhouse gas emissions’

present a written or oral report based on research, highlighting how an international event has impacted on Australian society

present a photographic, or other audio-visual, report on the debate on one world heritage decision in Australia

prepare a map and photographic display of change in an urban centre as a result of changes in the rural economy

roleplay a political campaign responding to a major issue and show how different political parties respond to one issue, identifying target audiences e.g. rural/urban concerns



identify changes

investigate the local area (as either an urban or rural centre) and compare it with an adjacent settlement, which is opposite in nature to the original

collect data from each of these communities and investigate the similarities and differences in the types of changes which have occurred e.g. population growth may have occurred in the urban centre, to the detriment of smaller surrounding rural settlements; issues of landuse could be significant


produce a corroborated argument

as a group present an argument in written or oral form for one of the above changes



carry out field studies

map the current landuse in an area and compare it to historical records of the chosen area

conduct surveys and collate oral histories as part of the primary data to be used to determine the extent of changes/benefits-disadvantages of changes




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