Studies of Society and Environment Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes



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Culture and Identity


Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes.

The following elaborations are examples only of what students know and can do, and should not be considered prescriptive or exhaustive.
Key concept: Cultural perceptions

Key process: Creating






Level 5

Level 5

Level 6

Level 6

Learning outcome

Core CI 5.2

Students devise practical and informed strategies that respond to the impact of particular perceptions of cultural groups held by a community.



Geography CI 5.2

Students identify and debate the extent to which the mass media, fashions and fast-food outlets are having a homogenising effect on cultures around the world.



Core CI 6.2

Students develop a proposal to promote a socially just response to perceptions of cultures associated with a current issue.



Geography CI 6.2

Students evaluate how school and community activities and national and international organisations promote cultural diversity and celebration.



Students know:
Cultural perceptions

impacts of particular perceptions of cultural groups held by a community

cultural identities expressed in media and literature vary with time and place

stereotypes prevalent within a community and education/employment/social opportunities

rural/urban divide and political policy

perceptions of socio-economic advantage and disadvantage within communities and impact on political policy

regional disputes, development of ghettos as negative results of cultural diversity

government policies/activities and cultural cohesion


global trends towards homogenised landscapes

same restaurants, clothing styles, business houses, music, movies, sports and so on -this global popular culture threatens cultural diversity

the world is a shrinking space due to improved communications and transport technologies. Other processes such as globalisation, sport, tourism and migration, are having an homogenizing impact


perceptions of cultures associated with a current issue

media images, culture and crime

asylum seekers (boat people, etc) and need for detention e.g. Port Hedland

changing policies and practices of water allocation in rural areas

privileged position of US military facilities in Australia

gun ownership and Australian identity

homelessness (youth and other)

gender e.g. perpetuation of ‘glass-ceiling’

race based prejudice and minority groups in Asia Pacific region


ways to promote cultural diversity and celebration

celebration of International days - Greek National Day, St Patrick’s Day, Bastille Day

Australian Government Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, Harmony Day, March 21st

United Nations Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination



Students can:
Create

devise practical and informed strategies

create a display of significant Australian leaders and their cultural identity/place of birth

alleviate negative perceptions in the local community e.g. highlight the benefits of a particular group for the rest of society with its contribution to cultural diversity; devise information campaign to promote the benefits of cultural diversity within local/regional community


identify and debate

debate the issue ‘The spread of McDonald’s Fast Food Outlets is causing homogenisation of culture.’

create a collage of symbols that reflect the homogenising effect of global culture the swoosh, golden arches and so on. Link these symbols to world maps showing global distribution of Trans-national Corporations (TNCs)

develop a list of items that could be placed in a time capsule to represent global popular culture around 2002



develop a proposal to promote a socially just response

on the basis of a geographical inquiry, including analysis of data, into a particular issue, prepare a speech outlining what could be done to promote a socially just response e.g. speech to assembly outlining measures to remove media bias in reporting of youth culture

brainstorm suggested responses to an issue e.g. land clearing and evaluate the effectiveness of each response for concerned groups


promote and evaluate

hold festivals to promote cultural awareness within the school community

imagine themselves as TV reporters who have been asked to present a 5-minute documentary on the cultural diversity in the local area. The documentary could consist of interviews of people from different cultural groups

evaluate the effectiveness of national days celebrated locally through attendance of the celebrations





Culture and Identity


Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes.

The following elaborations are examples only of what students know and can do, and should not be considered prescriptive or exhaustive.
Key concept: Belonging

Key process: Participating






Level 5

Level 5

Level 6

Level 6

Learning outcome

Core CI 5.3

Students share their sense of belonging to a group, to analyse cultural aspects that construct their identities.



Geography GCI 5.3

Students evaluate the impact of European colonisation on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.



Core CI 6.3

Students collaboratively develop a community strategy for celebrating or moderating the effects of globalisation on cultural groups to which they belong.



Geography CI 6.3

Students compare at least two different communities, identifying factors that contribute to their sense of community identity.



Students know:
Belonging

cultural aspects and construct of identities

different cultures, local, national, global, and symbols of belonging e.g. dress, behaviour, language

teenage culture and impact of multinationals e.g. group identity associated with particular clothing, foods, leisure activities, attitudes

processes of development of dominant group identities e.g. influence of media, product marketing and effects of geographic isolation



sense of belonging to a group

similarities and differences in rural/urban basis of belonging

basis of belonging for Australian Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders

different group means of satisfying needs e.g. essential food and shelter, spiritual, social requirements



the impact of European colonisation on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures

dispossession- loss of tribal territories or the removal of people from traditional lands

Aboriginal groups resisted all over Australia resulting in a decline in population numbers – massacres e.g. Myall Creek

Aboriginal groups had no resistance to European diseases such as small pox and the common cold. Prior to European invasion, there is little evidence of disease. This resulted in declining numbers



effects of globalisation on cultural groups which may be celebrated/moderated

ease of communication and transportation e.g. internet and rural business

information technology and growth of industry in provincial centres e.g. ‘Woolworths’ base in Warwick

local to global recognition and acceptance of difference

ability to apply global solutions to resolve problems associated with particular cultures e.g. land rights

LOTE in Australian schools

economic and social advantages of increased international tourism

market access e.g. beef industry

disempowerment of small/less influential cultures

international accountability for social, political, economic and environmental policy and actions e.g. Greenhouse gas emissions, human rights issues

deregulation of labour market

establishment of international organisations and treaties e.g. UN, UNESCO, Agenda 21



factors that contribute to sense of community identity

immigrants from the same country tend to concentrate in a particular area e.g. the Italians in Leidhhardt, Sydney; the Koreans in Campsie, Sydney

some factors that contribute to community identity

birthplace of residents

place of worship

language/signage

types of businesses (food and clothing outlets)

restaurants

entertainment


Students can:
Participate

share their sense of belonging to a group to analyse cultural aspects

interview peers (same/different backgrounds) and discuss the similarities and differences between groups e.g. material/non-material; authority, family, etc.

engage with I-net chat room discussing data from students from different parts of the world

co-operatively present findings in an oral, written, visual media format

co-operatively prepare a diagram to indicate network of group membership


mapping and graphing activities in order to evaluate

the spatial distribution of aboriginal groups before European colonisation. Note that there were over 300 Aboriginal nation-states defined by geographical boundaries (rivers, lakes, mountains)

the population distribution of aborigines before European colonisation -concentration of population on the northern, eastern and southern coastlines

the spatial distribution of missions and reserves for aboriginal groups in Australia today

the population distribution of aboriginal groups today

graph the population changes from 1788 to the present



collaboratively develop a community strategy

organise a forum /debate to discuss the effects of globalisation on particular cultural group/s and develop strategy for celebration/moderation

invite specific members of the public, with experience of the effects of globalisation (e.g. youth workers, aid workers/business interests, etc.) to discuss these effects on particular groups

work in teams to devise strategies for addressing globalisation concerns, based on verbal and other collected data e.g. lobbying strategy involving state/federal government



participate in a field excursion

gathering of field data on two communities for comparison so as to determine the factors that have contributed to the communities’ identities.

data would involve photographing streetscapes, interviewing residents, visiting shopping precinct to determine food/cuisine, clothing, and visiting places of worship, and so on

Culture and Identity


Elaborations of core learning outcomes using a geographical perspective and geography learning outcomes.

The following elaborations are examples only of what students know and can do, and should not be considered prescriptive or exhaustive.
Key concept: Cultural change

Key process: Communicating






Level 5

Level 5

Level 6

Level 6

Learning outcome

Core CI 5.4

Students describe how governments have caused changes to particular groups.






Core CI 6.4

Students describe instances of cultural change resulting from government legislation or policies that have impacted on cultural groups.






Students know:
Cultural change

particular cultural groups

rural/urban communities

residents of particular places e.g. inner city, urban-rural fringe, remote regions

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

rural women and changing identity

isolated children

migrants

role of government

local, state, federal governments in legislative (law making), executive (policy development) and administrative (implementing law and policy) roles

government action and

economic status

level of dependency

inclusion

welfare

mobility


economic opportunity




cultural groups

local, national, global examples of cultures subject to change through government regulation/policy e.g.

Irian Jaya

Soweto


Bikini Atoll

Bamaga/Mapoon



government legislation or policies

local government planning provisions e.g. gentrification proposals for inner-city areas; restriction on provision of services to outlying suburbs

state/federal government policies which have impacted upon rural/regional Australia e.g. Mabo legislation, Regional Forestry Agreements, land-clearing legislation; establishment of Land Councils e.g. Carpentaria Land Council

transmigration policies in Indonesia



cultural change

increased recognition of needs/value e.g. Aboriginal culture in recent years

decreased recognition of needs/value e.g. impact of deregulation policies on Australian primary producers

fluctuations in terms of catering for needs of immigrants to Australia

majority/minority status e.g. East Timor





Students can:
Communicate

describe the role of government in cultural change

students communicate in written or oral form how governments have caused changes to a particular group e.g. students write a letter to a politician commenting on a particular government stance






describe instances of cultural change resulting from government legislation or policies

communicate changes in

rural Australia

selected urban areas through exercises utilising graphs, maps, diagrams, tables of statistics



develop a written report comparing and contrasting the situation in Australia for a particular cultural group and the situation in another country, for a corresponding group (e.g. indigenous inhabitants, unemployed youth, remote rural inhabitants etc.)







© The State of Queensland (The Office of the Queensland School Curriculum Council) 2001
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