Structured Academic Controversy: fdr’s New Deal



Download 34.01 Kb.
Date conversion16.05.2016
Size34.01 Kb.
Structured Academic Controversy:

FDR’s New Deal

President Roosevelt is best known for leading the country through the Great Depression. The New Deal was a set of policies designed to provide “relief, recovery, and reform” that would alleviate the suffering of millions of Americans.


During today’s class, you will work in teams to discuss whether or not the New Deal was a success. Your goals for today should include looking at all the issues, seeing both sides, and finding common ground.
SAC QUESTION

During the SAC, you and your group will try to answer the following question:



Was the New Deal a Success or Failure?

Team A will argue: YES, the New Deal was a success.

Team B will argue: NO, the New Deal was a failure.
EVIDENCE

As you develop your arguments for the SAC, use as many of the following possible sources of evidence as you can from the New Deal document set.


PROCEDURE

20 minutes With your teammate, read the documents in the New Deal Document Set. Find five pieces of evidence which support your side.

5 minutes Team A presents. BOTH PARTNERS MUST PRESENT!!!

Team B writes down Team A’s arguments and then repeats them back to Team A.



5 minutes Team B presents. BOTH PARTNERS MUST PRESENT!!!

Team A writes down arguments of Team B and then repeats them back to Team B.



14 minutes Everyone CAN ABANDON their positions. Group of 4 attempts to develop a consensus.

Was the New Deal a success or a failure?


DOCUMENT A: Fireside Chat (Modified)

President Roosevelt gave this speech over the radio on May 7, 1933, two months after he became president. He called these radio addresses “fireside chats,” and this was his second one as president.

Tonight, I come for the second time to tell you about what we have been doing and what we are planning to do. . . .

First, we are giving opportunity of employment to one-quarter of a million of the unemployed, especially the young men, to go into forestry and flood prevention work…

Next, the Congress is about to pass legislation that will greatly ease the mortgage distress among the farmers and the home owners of the nation, by easing the burden of debt now bearing so heavily upon millions of our people…

I know that the people of this country will understand this and will also understand the spirit in which we are undertaking this policy…

All of us, the Members of the Congress and the members of this Administration owe you, the people of this country, a profound debt of gratitude.



Source: President Roosevelt’s “Fireside Chat,” May 7, 1933.

DOCUMENT B: African Americans & the New Deal

Most New Deal programs discriminated against blacks. The NRA (National Recovery Administration), for example, not only offered whites the first crack at jobs but allowed separate and lower wages for blacks. The Federal Housing Authority (FHA) refused to guarantee mortgages for blacks who tried to buy in white neighborhoods, and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) maintained segregated camps. Furthermore, the Social Security Act did not include most jobs blacks historically held.

The story in agriculture was particularly grim. Since 40 percent of all black workers made their living as sharecroppers and tenant farmers, the Agricultural Adjustment Association (AAA) land reduction hit blacks hard. White landlords could make more money by leaving land unplanted than by planting it. As a result, the AAA's policies forced more than 100,000 blacks off the land in 1933 and 1934.

Even more upsetting to black leaders, the president failed to support an anti-lynching law and a law to abolish the poll tax. Roosevelt feared that conservative southern Democrats, would block his bills if he tried to fight them on this issue.



Source: Modified excerpt from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History online textbook.


DOCUMENT C: Federal Writer’s Book Project

I do think that Roosevelt is the biggest-hearted man we ever had in the White House…It’s the first time in my recollection that a President ever got up and said, “I’m interested in and aim to do somethin’ for the workin’ man.’ Just knowin’ that for once there was a man to stand up and speak for him, a man that could make what he felt so plain nobody could doubt he meant it, has made a lot of us feel a lot better even when there wasn’t much to eat in our homes.



Source: George Dobbin was a 67-year old cotton-mill worker when he was interviewed for the book These Are Our Lives, a book put together by the Federal Writer’s Project in 1939.

DOCUMENT D: Hot Lunches for School Children (Modified)

One million undernourished children have benefited by the Works Progress Administration's school lunch program. In the past year and a half 80,000,000 hot well-balanced meals have been served at the rate of 500,000 daily in 10,000 schools throughout the country…

For many children, who are required to leave home early in the morning and travel long distances after school hours to reach their homes, the WPA lunch constitutes the only hot meal of the day…

Through the daily service of warm, nourishing food, prepared by qualified, needy women workers, the WPA is making it possible for many underprivileged children of the present to grow into useful, healthy citizens of the future.



Source: Speech by Ellen S. Woodward, Assistant Administrator; Works Progress Administration.

DOCUMENT E: Economic Statistics





DOCUMENT F: “No Depression in Heaven”



Source: Song Written and Performed by the Carter Family Recorded: 1936

DOCUMENT G: Wither the American Indian? (Modified)

Roosevelt appointed John Collier, a leading reformer, as Commissioner of Indian Affairs in 1933. Collier pushed Congress to create the Indian Emergency Conservation Program (IECP), a program that employed more than 85,000 Indians. Collier also made sure that the PWA, WPA, CCC, and NYA hired Native Americans.

In 1934 Collier convinced Congress to pass the Indian Reorganization Act, which provided money for tribes to purchase new land. That same year, the government provided federal grants to local school districts, hospitals, and social welfare agencies to assist Native Americans.

Congress is authorized to appropriate $10 million from which loans may be made for the purpose of promoting the economic development of the tribes…

About seventy-five of the tribal corporations are now functioning, with varying degrees of success, and the number continues to grow. The Jicarillas have bought their trading post and are running it; the Chippewas run a tourist camp; the Northern Cheyennes have a very successful livestock cooperative: the Swinomish of Washington have a tribal fishing business. There are plenty of others to prove these corporations can be made to work…

The truth is that the New Deal Indian administration is neither as successful as its publicity says it is, nor as black and vicious a failure as the severest critics would have us believe. Many Indian problems remain unsolved, but everyone has been addressed.



Source: Alden Stevens, “Whither the American Indian,” Survey Magazine of Social Interpretation, March 1, 1940.


DOCUMENT H: Last Hired, First Fired: Women and Minorities in the Great Depression (Modified)

The face of the Great Depression was generally male: shutdown steel mills, men begging in the streets or standing on bread lines. Less visibly, women had been hit hard. Women whose husbands made a living wage were considered expendable from the work force. A 1936 survey revealed that 82% of Americans believed married women whose husbands were employed full-time should not work for wages.

… Single women without children might find work in schools but were often ineligible for other government jobs during the Depression. These gendered policies differed significantly from programs such as the CCC, which employed millions of young men, and the jobs of the National Youth Administration, which were almost exclusively male.

Gendered notions of family and work made it especially difficult for women seeking jobs through the PWA, TVA, and the rest of the “alphabet soup” of federal programs. Only the WPA directed any specific action toward providing jobs for women, although these were usually in low-paying clerical and service positions. Even at its peak in 1938, only 13 percent of WPA workers were women. In addition, federal and state government policies encouraged private-sector employers to hire male heads of households first.

Those fortunate enough to find a job in the private sector found that the labor codes established by the NRA endorsed gender-specific pay scales that restricted women to certain kinds of jobs and still paid them less than men in many of those positions.

Source: David J. Trowbridge, "Last Hired, First Fired: Women and Minorities in the Great Depression." A History of the United States, Volume 2. Mar. 2012.




ORGANIZING THE EVIDENCE

Use this space to write your main points and the main points made by the other side.
The New Deal was a success: List the 5 main points/evidence that support this side.

1) From Document _____ :

2) From Document _____ :

3) From Document _____ :

4) From Document _____ :

5) From Document _____ :


The New Deal was a failure: List the 5 main points/evidence that support this side.

1) From Document _____ :

2) From Document _____ :

3) From Document _____ :

4) From Document _____ :

5) From Document _____ :



LAST Name______________________________

Starting now, you may abandon your assigned position.

Was the New Deal a success or failure? What evidence supports your claim? What other evidence would you need to strengthen your claim?

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



Grading: Responses will be graded using the following rubric.

Accomplished

  • The response’s claim is clearly introduced, communicated, and maintained within the context while addressing alternate or opposing claims.

  • The response has a clear and effective organizational structure as evidenced by a logical progression of ideas from beginning to end with effective, consistent use of a variety of transitional strategies and strong connections among ideas.

  • The response provides thorough and convincing support for the claim that includes the smoothly integrated, comprehensive, relevant, and concrete effective use of evidence from the sources.

  • The response achieves substantial depth that is specific and relevant with effective use of a variety of elaborative techniques.

  • The response clearly and effectively expresses ideas, using precise, academic language appropriate for the audience and purpose.

  • The response demonstrates a strong command of conventions with few, if any, errors present in usage and sentence formation and effective and consistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

Proficient

  • The response’s claim is clear and for the most part maintained, though some loosely related material may be present; context provided for the claim is adequate.

  • The response has an organizational structure as evidenced by an adequate progression of ideas from beginning to end, adequate use of transitional strategies with some variety, and adequate, if slightly inconsistent, connection among ideas.

  • The response provides adequate support for the claim that includes a general integration of some evidence from the sources though citations may be general or imprecise.

  • The response achieves some depth and specificity but is predominantly general with adequate use of some elaborative techniques.

  • The response adequately expresses ideas, using a mix of precise with more general language which is generally appropriate for the audience and purpose.

  • The response demonstrates an adequate command of conventions with some errors in usage and sentence formation, but no systematic pattern of errors is displayed; adequate use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

Developing

  • The response’s claim may be clearly focused but is insufficiently sustained and may have a minor drift in focus and/or be somewhat unclear and unfocused.

  • The response has an inconsistent organizational structure as evidenced by an uneven progression of ideas from beginning to end, inconsistent use of basic transitional strategies with little variety, and weak connection among ideas.

  • The response provides uneven, cursory support for the claim that includes weakly integrated evidence from the sources and citations, if present, are uneven/inconsistent.

  • The response achieves little depth through weak or uneven use of elaborative techniques.

  • The response expresses ideas unevenly, using simplistic language which may at times be inappropriate for the audience and purpose.

  • The response demonstrates a partial command of conventions with frequent errors in usage which may obscure meaning; inconsistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

Initial

  • The response’s claim may be related to the purpose but may be confusing or ambiguous and offer little relevant detail; response may be very brief and/or have a major drift.

  • The response has little or no discernible organizational structure as evidenced by frequent extraneous ideas and few or no transitional strategies are evident

  • The response provides minimal support for the claim that includes little or no, absent, erroneous, or irrelevant evidence from the sources.

  • The response expression of ideas is vague, lacks clarity, or is confusing and may have little sense of audience and purpose.

  • The response demonstrates a lack of command of conventions with frequent and severe errors.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page