Stevie Rial – Digital Media Journalism Y2 – March, 2013 Planning Draft for Essay Proposal: ppd4 New Media Semester My selected question is



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Stevie Rial – Digital Media Journalism Y2 – March, 2013

Planning Draft for Essay Proposal: PPD4 New Media Semester 2.

My selected question is –

The effects of War have often acted as a catalyst for photographers, journalists, artists and designers”.

For this essay I intend to show how visual propaganda imagery manipulates’ reactions and awareness to the truth of the realities of war, sanctioning photographers, journalists to showcase their angles of conflict.

The Vietnam, Falklands and the ongoing conflict in Syria all have brought propaganda images to our lives; I will explore these images and what they represent.

The Journalists who reported news from the ships on the way to the Falkland Island gave insight into the task force that was assembled. They occupied the news with extraordinary information from the start of the journey that set sail from Great Britain to the islands that only few had heard about. The news regarding war could now be reported next day on the television bringing propaganda straight into our homes. By researching the Falklands war I will show how big the television propaganda tool was.

Photos and news from the Syrian war can be sent instantly, interactive media now holds the key to a new world of propaganda in raising awareness of the complex realities of war. The news over flows with images sent by Facebook and Twitter, I will research whether this is a positive enforcer or a negative one.

I have explored many images showing the effects of war by researching websites, reading through books, seeking out old news stories and through personal accounts of conflict. This included looking into the life of Simon Weston who suffered major burns when the boat he was in during the Falklands war was hit. I found it an inspiring story reading about this man who had his whole world turned upside down but who always found the positives in life, despite its hardships. His burned face became one of the most notable images. Newspapers emotive reporting of Simon made everyone aware of the pain of injured soldiers. I will explore more the affects have of showing pictures of the injured service men in the three wars.

I have researched propaganda in informative books, historical reference websites and specific links relating to the Vietnam, Falklands and the Syria Civil War.

I have selected images from the three wars, thinking the images have a higher degree of propaganda. I intend to mention who the photographers are and explain the personality of the image.



description: f:\untitled folder\nlfleaf09f.jpg description: f:\untitled folder\syria_2441295b.jpg description: f:\untitled folder\vietnam war 2.jpg

Vietnam War Pic 4 Syrian Civil War Pic 5 Vietnam War Pic 6

description: see full size image http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/1905000/images/_1906388_weston_after150.jpg

Falklands War Pic 1 Falklands Pic 2 Falklands Pic 3 Falklands Pic 4

Stevie Rial – 8th March, 2013. – Foundation Degree Digital Media Journalism YR2.

PPD4 New Media Course – Semester 2.

The Effects of War have often acted as a catalyst for Photographers, Journalists, Artists and Designers”.

For this essay I intend to show how visual propaganda imagery manipulates reactions and awareness to the truth of the realities of war, sanctioning photographers, journalists to showcase their angles of conflict.

There are numerous photography books on War full of propaganda and images of sacrifice, manipulating our senses and emotions which prove there is nothing good about war, never the less we hope the photography books will enforce peace.

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its labourers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.”

Dwight D. Eisenhower.

During the Falklands conflict ‘The Sun’ headline propaganda image ‘Gotcha’ wanted us to feel good for striking back at the enemy. Its main purpose was this and it was used as an instigator for Britain to feel upbeat in the battle against Argentina for the Falkland Islands.



description: see full size image

Falklands War Picture 1

The journalists who reported the news from the ships on the way to the Falkland Islands gave insight into the task force that was assembled. They occupied the news with extraordinary information from the start of the journey that set sail from Great Britain to the Islands that only few had heard about. The news regarding war could now be reported next day on the television bringing propaganda straight into our homes.

“I'm not allowed to say how many planes joined the raid, but I counted them all out and I counted them all back.” Brian Hanrahan

Quote above from Brian Hanrahan relating to his reporting of the Falklands war from his standpoint whilst being on the HMS Hermes aircraft carrier ship. This famous quote is regarded by many as one of the most iconic sentences by broadcasting journalists during the Falklands war. Brian couldn’t report and say how many planes in the air raids due to military intelligence.

The television propaganda tool was used to keep the spirits up of the British people. It showed solidarity across the nation for the service personnel. It also sent the messages out to the enemy that the British forces were in control and would liberate the Falkland Islands. Filming of vessels being attacked, along with the land battles were evident for the world to see. Destructive images on the television of destroyed warships sent shocks into homes, as most homes had televisions, showing what the effects of exocet missiles where doing.

Television stations reported broadcasts of the conflict; the Government censored what news was given out by the Ministry of Defense. News broadcasters could portray the accounts for the expectant viewers and see filming confirming their words.



Falklands War Picture 2

see full size image

Pictures of Simon Weston by the BBC News Picture 2 & 3

I researched the life of ‘Simon Weston’ who suffered horrific burns during the Falklands conflict when his ship the ‘Sir Galahad’ was struck by Argentinean bombs. I found it an inspiring story reading about this man who had his life turned upside down but who always found the positives in life.

Newspapers emotive reporting of Simon made everyone aware of the pain of injured soldiers.

This image above shows Simon Weston’s injuries that he sustained during the Falklands war. The image shows the depth of the burns that Simon suffered during Falkland’s conflict in 1982. To many Simon Weston is “the face” of the Falklands war, his story and how he battled back to carry on with his day to day life is a story we all can admire.

For many of the photographers taking pictures during the Falklands war it must have been a harrowing experience at times for them but they did their job well, wanting us to know how our service men and women where putting their lives on the line for one of our sovereign territories.



Falkland War Picture 4

Google Images

This picture above shows Time magazine’s take on the British going into battle with Argentina at one of the tensest moments during the Falklands conflict. I think this picture represents a lot of mainstream media’s view of the British when they went into battle, showing that we were determined to withhold the freedom and democracy of the Falkland Islands.

Photography wise the image here is taken from an action point of view, it does not seem scripted to me as an image meaning the soldiers weren’t acting for the image, this was real life action of people being on the front line preparing for battle.

Links looked into

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1384736/TV-news-veteran-Brian-Hanrahan-leaves-500k-legacy.html

http://yourcardiff.walesonline.co.uk/2012/02/09/falklands-veteran-simon-weston-enters-police-commissioner-race/

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/vietweb.htm

www.yale.edu/glc/Stratford/vietnam.htm

http://www.history.ac.uk/ihr/Focus/cold/websites.html



http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=falklands+war+propaganda+mages&source=images&cd=&docid=NdFRjsHm6E1M9M&tbnid=mpxs_Eb51YxkFM:&ved=0CAQQjB0&url=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.the-american-interest.com%2Fwrm%2F2010%2F03%2F04%2Fpatagonian-pander-predictably-flops%2F&ei=5NojUaHvBuq30QXiy4DQAQ&bvm=bv.42553238,d.d2k&psig=AFQjCNFC8GIBWv1JeoIE3ZszPJeuoj2aHw&ust=1361390637261284

http://history1900s.about.com/od/vietnamwar/a/vietnamwar.htm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/asia_pac/05/vietnam_war/html/introduction.stm

Books looked into

The Vietnam war 1956-1975 (Essential Histories) [Paperback] Andy Wiest, Osprey Publishing, 2002


Vietnam A war lost and won, Nigel Cawthorne, Arcturus Publishing, 2003
The Falklands War, Martin Middlebrook, Pen & Sword Military, 2012
Propaganda, Edward L.Bernays, IG Publishing; New Ed edition, 2004




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