Statewide Descriptive Results: First Report



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Parents in prison do not deserve visits with their children” (n = 981)*

  • 22.9% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 67.7% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

  • 9.4% agreed/ strongly agreed

Finding adoptive homes for teens is nearly impossible” (n = 983)



  • 26.% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 36.3% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 37.6% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

Teens in foster care do not want to be adopted” (n = 982)



  • 21.1% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 8% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 70.9% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

Families are doing the best that they can at that moment” (n = 976)*



  • 36.9% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 39.7% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 23.5% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

The families that I serve are basically all the same” (n = 980)



  • 6.7% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 85.5% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

  • 7.7% agreed/ strongly agreed

Fathers often make the family situation worse” (n = 983)



  • 18.7% of responses were neutral/ not sure

  • 3.1% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 78.1% disagreed/ strongly disagreed


Parents who neglect or abuse children – want to change to resist change (n = 985)*

  • 25.8% of responses were neutral/ not sure

  • 45.0% of responses fell towards want to change side of the scale

  • 26.7% of responses fell on the resist change side of the scale


Working with community partners takes more time and effort than it is worth (n = 979)

  • 11.0% of responses were neutral/ not sure

  • 4.4% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 84.6% disagreed/ strongly disagreed


Summary of Beliefs and Values on Family/ Youth Capacity

  • 85.5% disagreed “The families that I serve are basically all the same”

  • 84.6% disagreed/ strongly disagreed “Working with community partners takes more time and effort than it is worth”

  • 78.3% disagreed/ strongly disagreed “Parents who abuse substances will work harder on their case plan if we remove their children”

  • 78.1% disagreed “Fathers often make the family situation worse”

  • 70.9% disagreed/ strongly disagreed “Teens in foster care do not want to be adopted”

  • 69.3% disagreed “Most children/ youth are too young to really know what they need”

  • 68.1% disagreed with “Because the family cannot see things clearly, it is best that DCBS staff determine the case plan tasks”

  • 63.9% responded that most parents/ families finish their work with DCBS with more strengths than barriers

  • 67.7% disagreed “Parents in prison do not deserve visits with their children”

  • 56.3% responded that relatives of CPS families are part of the solution rather than part of the problem

  • 55.9% agreed/ strongly agreed “Unless a family admits their errors or troubles, they are not ready for change”

  • 54.1% disagreed/ strongly disagreed ““The apple does not fall far from the tree is true about” is true about relatives of most DCBS families”

  • 50.2% responded most parents/ families served by DCBS come with barriers rather than strengths.

  • 45.0% of respondents indicated parents that abuse or neglect children want to change more than they resist change

  • 39.7% agreed/ strongly agreed “Families are doing the best they can at the moment”

  • 37.6% disagreed/ strongly disagreed “ Finding adoptive homes for teens is nearly impossible”


III.B Beliefs and Values on Empowering Others (10 Items)
Families fail when they have to wait too long to get the services they need” (n=978)*

  • 19.0% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 66.7% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 14.3% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

Families fail when they are confused by their case plan” (n = 981)



  • 14.9% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 75.1% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 10.0% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

Seeing families and children improve or make progress is satisfying” (n = 983)



  • 1.5% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 97.9% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • .6% of disagreed/ strongly disagreed


Relatives of CPS families are - Well prepared to Need preparation (n = 970)

  • 29.8% of DCBS staff surveyed said relatives of CPS families somewhere in between being well prepared and needing preparation

  • 8.2% indicated that relatives of CPS families are well prepared

  • 62% indicated that relatives of CPS families need preparation

I think that peer support groups might be helpful to CPS families” (n = 972)*



  • 16.6% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 78.5% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 4.9% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

When children enter OOHC, it is vital to consider multiple permanency options” (n=975)



  • 13.8% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 79.5% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 6.7% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

If we terminate the parent’s rights, then we need to find permanent connection for the child” (n =978)



  • 6.7% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 91.1% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 2.1% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

DCBS workers should monitor and guide services for children placed with PCC agencies (foster homes and residential settings)” (n = 985)



  • 8.8% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 86.6% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 4.4% disagreed/ strongly agreed

Most adolescents are capable of making a transition to adult life without DCBS assistance” (n= 982)*



  • 16.5% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 10.7% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 72.8% disagreed/ strongly disagreed



Progress for youth with status behaviors is achieved with - Youth treatment to family treatment (n = 976)

  • 55.7% of responses fell on the family treatment services side of the scale

  • 9.2% of responses fell on the youth treatment side of the scale



Summary of Beliefs and Values on Empowering Others

  • 97.9% of respondents agreed that “Seeing families and children improve or make progress is satisfying”

  • 91.1% of respondents agreed that “If we terminate the parent’s rights, then we need to find permanent connection for the child”

  • 86.6% agreed that “DCBS workers should monitor and guide services for children placed with PCC agencies (foster homes and residential settings)”

  • 84.6% disagreed with the statement “The families that I serve are basically all the same”

  • 79.5% of respondents agree that “When children enter OOHC, it is vital to consider multiple permanency options”

  • 78.5% of staff surveyed agreed with the statement “I think that peer support groups might be helpful to CPS families”

  • 75.1% of staff surveyed indicated “Families fail when they are confused by their case plan”

  • 72.8% disagreed with the statement “Most adolescents are capable of making a transition to adult life without DCBS assistance”

  • 66.7% indicated that “Families fail when they have to wait too long to get the services they need”

  • 62% indicated that relatives of CPS families need preparation rather than come prepared

  • 55.7% of respondent indicated that changes to status behavior are related more to family treatment rather than youth treatment


III.C. Causal Beliefs (6 Items)
Workers make decisions about families based on what they think the courts want or will do” (n = 979)

  • 24.3% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 33% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 42.7% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

Families fail when they have too many providers” (n = 982)



  • 30.2% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 26.3% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 43.5% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

Workers prioritize children and families in out-of-home care cases over in-home care cases” (n = 986)



  • 29.1% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 41.5% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 29.4% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

Engaging families in decisions or case planning takes more time than P & P workers have” (n = 981)*



  • 15.1% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 26.4% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 58.5% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

The families/ parents of children in out-of-home care (OOHC) are the primary clients” (n = 977)



  • 25.1% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 22.3% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 52.6% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

If it weren’t for my luck and circumstances, I could be a client of DCBS” (n = 980)



  • 24.3% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 33.0% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 42.7% disagreed/ strongly disagreed



Summary of Causal Beliefs

  • 58.5% of respondents disagreed with the statement “Engaging families in decisions or case planning takes more time than P & P workers have”

  • 52.6% of respondents agreed that “The families/ parents of children in out-of-home care (OOHC) are the primary clients”

  • 42.7 % disagreed with the statement, “Workers make decisions about families based on what they think the courts want or will do”

  • 42.7% of respondents agreed that “If it weren’t for my luck and circumstances, I could be a client of DCBS”

  • 43.5% indicated “Families fail when they have too many providers”

  • 41.5 % of staff surveyed indicated that “Workers prioritize children and families in out-of-home care cases over in-home care cases”


III.D. Beliefs and values on Out-of-Home Care (5 Questions)
I believe that DCBS foster parents are teachers and models for birth parents” (n = 965)*

  • 28.9% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 52.5% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 18.5% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

I believe that Private (PCC) foster parents are teachers and models for birth parents” (n = 974)



  • 33.4% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 45.3% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 21.4% disagreed/ strongly

Children are safer in foster care than with parents” (n = 985)*



  • 48.6% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 14.6% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 36.8% disagreed/ strongly agreed

Relative/ Kinship Care placements require less time than DCBS foster care placements” (n = 982)*



  • 19.8% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral

  • 33.4% of respondents agreed with the statement

  • 46.8% of respondents disagreed


Summary of Beliefs and Values on Out-of-Home Care

  • 52.5% agreed/ strongly agreed with the statement “I believe that DCBS foster parents are teachers and models for birth parents”

  • 48.6% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure that “Children are safer in foster care than with parents”

  • 46.8% disagreed with the statement “Relative/ Kinship Care placements require less time than DCBS foster care placements”

  • 45.3% agreed/ strongly agreed with the statement “I believe that Private (PCC) foster parents are teachers and models for birth parents”


III.E. Beliefs and Values on Conditions for Removing Children (7 Items)
Survey respondents were asked to respond to 7 different scenarios as to how often a child should be removed from a home .The options given were; Almost Always Remove, Often Remove, Maybe Remove, and Almost Never Remove. The following table lists the conditions ranked in order of the likelihood of removal based on average scores.


More Likely







A sexual offender lives in the home*




Newborn tests positive for illegal drug-substances*




Both parents test positive for illegal drug-substances*




Woman fails to file an EPO or allows perpetrator in the home after a DVO is ordered







Child is witness to domestic violence




Following reunification, any new allegation or instance of non-compliance




Unstable housing, parents are living in a shelter or “here, there, or anywhere

Less likely



The following chart shows how often each selection was chosen for each of the conditions presented.


III.F. Professional work values (4 Questions)
My job in DCBS is to - Ensure family compliance to Engage the family (n = 953)

  • 28.4% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral

  • 11.9% of responses on the ensure family compliance side of the scale

  • 59.7% of responses were on the engage the family side of the scale


My job in DCBS is to – Follow others to Provide Leadership (n = 953)

  • 17.0% of DCBS staff surveyed indicated that their job in DCBS is to both follow others and provide leadership

  • 8.9% of staff surveyed indicated that their job in DCBS is to follow others

  • 74.1% indicated that their job in DCBS is to provide leadership


My job in DCBS is to - Provide services to coordinate services (n = 972)

  • 24.9% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral

  • 51.7% of responses fell on the coordinate services side of the scale

  • 23.4% of responses fell on the provide services side of the scale

Families want DCBS staff to be direct and honest with them” (n = 984)



  • 4.7% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 88.0% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 7.3% disagreed/ strongly disagreed



When working with families, CPS workers are - Facilitators to Experts (n = 981)

  • 25.5% of DCBS staff reported a neutral response indicating that staff indicated that CPS workers were equally facilitators and experts

  • 68.6% indicated CPS workers were facilitators

  • 5.9% indicated CPS workers were experts

My supervisor reinforces values that help me work with families” (n = 978)



  • 16.0% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 74.0% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 10.0% disagreed/ strongly disagreed

My work in DCBS is personally rewarding” (n = 983)



  • 19.0% of DCBS staff surveyed were neutral/ not sure

  • 67.8% agreed/ strongly agreed

  • 13.2% disagreed/ strongly disagreed



Summary of Professional Work Values

  • 88.0% agreed/ strongly agreed that families want DCBS to be direct and honest with them

  • 74.1% indicated that their job in DCBS is to provide leadership

  • 74.0% responded that their supervisor reinforces values that help them work with families

  • 68.6% indicated CPS workers were more facilitators rather than experts

  • 67.8% agreed/strongly agreed that their work in DCBS is personally rewarding

  • 59.7% of staff indicated that their job was to engage the family rather than ensure family compliance

  • 51.7% of staff surveyed felt that their job was to coordinate services rather than provide services


III.G. Effective traits (choice of 5 words)
When asked to select five words/ phrases to best describe effective traits/ actions for engaging families/ youth with DCBS, 87.4 percent of respondents selected the word ‘honest.’ This was by far the most selected trait/ action for engaging families/ youth.

The second most selected option was ‘Direct,’ which was selected 55.5% of the time by respondents, followed by ‘Professional’, ‘Hold Them Accountable,’ and ‘Attentive.’ Some frequently selected combinations of effective traits/ actions for engaging families where



  • Honest, Direct, Professional, Educating, and Hold Them Accountable

  • Honest, Direct, Attentive, Professional, and Hold Them Accountable

  • Honest, Direct, Professional, Hold Them Accountable, and Empathy

The following chart illustrates the most frequently selected traits/ actions for engaging families/ youth with DCBS, and represents the percent of respondents having selected that particular trait/ action.


See Appendix B for other frequently selected combinations of effective traits/ actions for engaging youth/ families with DCBS




  1. Conclusions and Next Steps

The responses to the Engaging Families: Values and Beliefs scale are rich with information. The high response rate among DCBS staff and the very low rate of missing data on any single item (most items less than 2%) suggest that the scale was seen as important by staff with adequate face validity.

This first report is simply a descriptive report displaying basic frequencies and data for use in discussions with the Protection and Permanency Workgroups. The workgroup on Family Engagement discussed the results on May 18, 2010 during their weekly meeting including what might be done with the information to align beliefs and values in areas with identified gaps. Additional meetings will be held with each workgroup and the results disseminated to the service regions through the CQI specialists. Discussions within DCBS over the next 3-4 months will greatly enhance the interpretation and use of these results.

Additional data analysis and display is planned including exploring differences in beliefs and values by service region, by years of experience, and by worker type. Summary scores and data displays will be helpful to staff in understanding and using these results and these are planned for the coming weeks.



References
Altman, J.C. (2008). Engaging families in child welfare services: Worker versus client perspectives.

Child Welfare, 87 (3), 41-60).
Casper, E.S., Oursler, J., Schmidt, L.T., & Gill, K.J. (2002). Measuring practitioners’ beliefs, goals,

and practices in psychiatric rehabilitation. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 23 (3), 223-234.


Dawson, K., & Berry, M. (2002). Engaging families in child welfare services: An evidence-based

approach to best practices. Child Welfare, 81, 293-317.


Huebner, R. A. (2002). Results of a previous beliefs scale are available from the author.
Huebner, R.A., Jones, B.L., Miller, V.P., Custer, M., & Critchfield, B. (2006). Comprehensive family

services and customer satisfaction outcomes. Child Welfare, 85(4), 691-714.


Kemp, S., Marcenko, M., Hoagwood, K., & Vesneski, W. (2009). Engaging parents in child welfare

services: Bridging family needs and child welfare mandates. Child Welfare, 88 (1), 101-126.


Kumpfer, K. L., & Alvarado, R. (2003). Family strengthening approaches for the prevention of youth

behaviors. American Psychologist, 58 (6/7), 457-465.


Ripple, C.H., & Zigler, E. (2003). Research, policy, and the federal role in prevention initiatives for

children. . American Psychologist, 58 (6/7), 482-490.


Seligman, M.E.P. (1990). Learned optimism: How to change your mind and life. New York, Pocket

Books (see explanatory style).



Appendix A
Department of Community Based Services

Engaging Families: Values and Beliefs Scale

(Huebner, Webb and Durbin 2010)

DCBS Values Survey Maintenance

Instructions and Acknowledgement

Kentucky’s Program Improvement Plan (PIP: Theme I) focuses on enhancing family involvement. Our beliefs, attitudes and values may shape how we engage others and what we expect from families. Beliefs, attitudes and values change throughout our lifetime with education, personal striving, and experiences. This survey is about your beliefs, attitudes and values. Your answers are very important to the PIP process and will be taken seriously.

Completing this survey is voluntary and if you decline there are no negative consequences. The survey is also anonymous; your answers cannot be linked to your name in any way. Completing the survey should take about 10 minutes.

All responses will be reported as summary scores. Your responses will help DCBS plan for changes, training, and supports to improve how we engage families. Please email rutha.huebner@ky.gov with questions on this survey.

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