State Papers Online a resource for French History



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State Papers Online - A Resource for French History
State Papers Online is an online archive of English/British State documents from the 16th and 17th centuries. The range of documents is enormous – from the reign of Francis I and his correspondence with Henry VIII; religious conflicts – most notably that of The Wars of Religion between 1562 – 98 which included the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre of the Protestants of 1572, to its end with the reign of Henry IV and the Edict of Nantes.
There are documents on the French people, politics, trade, treaties and lands throughout State Papers Online but Part II also includes the following manuscript series:


  • SP 78: France (50 volumes, 1577-1603)




State Papers Online, Parts I & II includes 329,527 Calendar entries, 1,101 Transcripts and 179,348 Manuscripts


Searches performed on the subject of ‘France’
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Full text searches on France and other aspects of 16th Century French history include the following titles with manuscripts:
The Treaties with France” (20 Aug 1514) SPO Part I
Receipt, 20 Aug. 6 Hen. VIII., from Sir John Daunce, by Rob. Tonyes and Wm. Edwardes "for the original writing of the treaty of peace betwixt England and France, the obligation for payment of the pension of France and the treaty of matrimony."
A treaty between England and France.” (April 12 1564) SPO Part II
A treaty between England and France. (a fragment. vid. Rym. XV. 644.) Also a letter from the French king. (two copies.) Troyes.
Affairs in France” ([May] 1576) SPO Part II
Articles for the exercise of religion and the administration of justice in France, accorded between the King and the Protestants.
France” (16 Aug 1526) SPO Part I
1. Commission by Louise the Regent to John Brinon and John J. de Vaulx, empowering them to undertake for the payment of two millions of gold crowns to Henry VIII., &c. Tours, 16 Aug. 1525.2. Draft of an article, stating that as a truce had been taken between the Regent of France and Margaret of Savoy, the king of England was no less inclined to peace.
Treaty of peace between Francis and Mary” (July 6 1560) SPO Part II
Treaty of peace between Francis and Mary, King and Queen of France and Scotland, on the one part, and Elizabeth Queen of England, France, and Ireland on the other part, made at Edinburgh
Charles prince of Castile, to Henry VIII; concerning a treaty with France.…” (April 1514) SPO Part II
Henry II. K. of France; his ordinance granting divers privileges in France to Scotchmen…” (July 11 1558)
Henry II. K. of France; his ordinance granting divers privileges in France to Scotchmen, in consequence of his son's marriage with Mary. (French.) given at Ville-Coteret, and registered by the parliament of Paris.
Minutes of letters from the K. of Scots, to the K. of France, and the Abp. of Glasgow,…” (1586?) SPO Part II
Minutes of letters from the K. of Scots, to the K. of France, and the Abp. of Glasgow, whom he continues ambassador in France.
Civil War in France” ([August] 1568) SPO Part II
A brief discourse of the means taken by the Cardinal of Lorraine to hinder the establishment of peace, and to bring back the troubles into France. Charges him with plotting against those of the religion, and enumerates instances of atrocities perpetrated against them in different parts of France.
Friends to France” ([Oct.] 1585) SPO Part II
“The names of such Scotishe lordes as desires to drawe course be France.”

Huntly, Catholic, France. Claud Hamilton is both Catholic and for France. Morton and Lord Herries his cousin both Catholic and for France. Crawford for France. Arrell, both Catholic and for France. Arran, who was confessed of late to be Catholic and for France. Colonel Stewart for France. Montrose a favourer of the Queen of Scotland and for France


A paper of historical notes, concerning Q. Elizabeth's title to Calais,…” [no date] SPO Part II
A paper of historical notes, concerning Q. Elizabeth's title to Calais, Q. Mary of Scots assuming the arms of England, the proceedings of the French and Scots, &c.
Heads of urgent affairs consequent on the death of the French King” (July 18 1559) SPO Part I
Heads of urgent affairs consequent on the death of the French King, Henry II. Maintenance of the faction in Scotland; to send to King Philip to renew the League. Letters to various parties in France.
Note that the money lent or expended by the Queen for the French King” (1596) SPO Part I
Note that the money lent or expended by the Queen for the French King amounts to 401,734l. 10s. 5 1/4d., cast up to 1594.
Louis XII” (7 Aug 1514) SPO Part I
Engagement of L. d'Orleans, John de Selva, and T. Bohier, on part of Louis XII., to pay one million of gold crowns to Henry VIII.; the first instalment of 50,000 francs to commence 1 Nov.
The treaty of Calais between Henry VIII. and Charles V. against Francis I. (Lat.) 1521” (1521) SPO Part II
The preamble and concluding clause of a truce between Charles V, Henry VIII,…” (Aug. 11, 1525) SPO Part II
Peace treaty between England and France; The Moor, 30 August 1525” (5 Aug. 1529) SPO Part II
Peace treaty between England and France; The Moor, 30 August 1525. IBT, ii, pp. 39-40. Dated 28 Aug. in the present MS. At f. 306 are two clauses from the treaty of Cambrai between Henry VIII and Emperor Charles V, 5 Aug. 1529, ibid. p. 41. Latin. Copies, mid 16th cent.
“ King James IV. to King Henry VIII” (July 16 1513) SPO Part I
King James IV. to King Henry VIII. Details various injuries and harms lately done unto himself and his subjects, which had obliged him to band with France. Desires him to desist from further invasion of the King of France, in whose defence he is obliged to take part.
Treaty of peace between Henry VIII and Francis I” (2 Oct 1518) SPO Part I
Treaty of peace between Henry VIII. and Francis I.

2. Draft of the treaty, London, 2 Oct. 1518. "Cum uno articulo quo cavetur quod Dux Albaniá non ibit in regnum Scotiá durante minori átate Regis Scotorum moderni."

R. O. Rym. xiii. 631. 4. French counterpart of the article for the comprehension of Scotland,/London, 2 Oct. 1518. Signed: G. Gouffier-Stephanus Parisien. Episcopus-F. de Rochechovart-De Neufville. With their seals.

R. O. 5. Part of the preamble of a treaty of peace, probably intended for the treaty of London.


Francis I. to Henry VIII” (22 Feb 1519) SPO Part I
After the death of his daughter Louise, had agreed with the King Catholic for a meeting to be held at Montpelier in March next, between Mons. Boisy, grand master of France, and Chievres, to arrange a marriage between the Catholic and his other daughter Charlotte; which Charles has urgently pressed for, especially since the death of his grandfather the Emperor. Desires to know Henry's pleasure by Boulen the English ambassador. Refers him further to De la Bastie, his ambassador "devers vous." Paris.
Henry VIII. and Francis I” (1535) SPO Part I
Articles proposed for a treaty between the two kings, viz.:-

1. That if the king of England should be attacked by any potentate, Francis should take his part.

2. That if he think fit to invade Flanders, Francis shall make an equal contribution.

3. That Francis shall not only, according to his promises, declare himself displeased at the censures passed by the bishop of Rome or his predecessors against the King, but shall do his utmost to get the said Bishop and his cardinals to revoke them, and, if they refuse, will look upon all treaties with them as abrogated…


[Henry VIII to Francis I]” (1538) SPO Part I
"Mon mieulx ayme frere, Jay receu voz lettres que ma delivreez levesque de Tarbe et par icelles entendu la bonne affection que avez a la fraternelle amytie dentre nous, mesmerveillant ung peu quil sen retourne sans nous bailler leffect de ses instructions par escript: Toutesfoiz puix quil a lesse sa commission par deça par votre commandement avecques le seigneur de Castillon votre ambassadeur lez moy resident, jespoire lavoir de luy. Car sans cela je ne vous pourrez faire response resolue pour lassurance et establissement dicelle. De quoy seroit bien marry. Votre bon frere, cousin, compere et perpetuel allye.
King Francis I. to King Henry VIII” (5 Jul 1540) SPO Part I
Treshault et Trespuissant Prince, nostre trescher et tresame Frere, Cousin, Compere, et perpetuel Allye, a Vous tant affectueusement et de cueur, que faire povons, Nous recommandons.
Field of Cloth of Gold” (1520) SPO Part I
Warrant to-, commanding him to wait upon the King with -"able and seemly persons, well and conveniently apparelled and horsed;" himself to appear as to his degree and honor belongeth, at the interview to be held between the kings of France and England in the marches of Calais in May next; which interview had been deferred from the previous year.
Ultimatum to France” ([22 June] 1543) SPO Part I
[Preamble of the Council's intimation to the French ambassador.]

To maintain the tranquility of Christendom, the King our sovereign joined in close amity with the Emperor…

…Likewise, your master procured the late King of Scots to break the peace and invade his Uncle's realm; and, since his death, has sent ambassadors and Scottish subjects into Scotland with offers of aid to continue the war.
The Emperor's Declaration against the Scots” (7 May 1544) SPO Part I
Precept of Charles V. to the count du Reulx, chevalier of his Order, and governor of his countries of Flanders, Artois, Lille, Douay and Orchies, to make proclamation that the Emperor declares enemies the subjects of Scotland, who, having always been received as friends in the Low Countries in pursuance of ancient treaties, have made a close alliance with the king of France (whom the Emperor and the King of England have declared to be their common enemy, both on account of his injustice to them and his alliance with the Turks) … And the Emperor's subjects are forbidden to haunt Scotland or favour the Scots.
The treaty of peace between Edward VI, and Henry II. K. of Fr.…” (March 24, 1550) SPO Part II
The treaty of peace between Edward VI, and Henry II. K. of Fr. for the surrender of Boulogne. (Lat. vid. Rym. XV. 211.) In Agro medio, inter Boloniam & Doultray.
Francis and Henry II. sons to Francis I, to Henry VIII; after their release from Spain. (Fr.) Congnac, August, 1530” (August 1530) SPO Part II
King Edward VI. to Henry II., King of France” (May 1551) SPO Part II
King Edward VI. to Henry II., King of France. Informing him of his election to the Order of the Garter at a Chapter held at Greenwich on the 24th of April last.
Francis II. King of France to the Queen Dowager of Scotland” (Jan. 12 1560) SPO Part II
King of France to the Queen Dowager of Scotland. Has sent the bearer to know concernin her health; wishes she could come and see him, as she will find no better remedy than in her daughter and himself. French. Blois.
Throckmorton to Cecil” (Dec. 6 1560) SPO Part II

The Queen has cause to thank God for all His mercies. The health of the late King of France was of great moment, and the death of this King of much more, who departed this world on 6 Dec. Has written to the Queen advising that letters of condolence should be sent to the French Queen, to the King of Navarre, and other principal personages, copies of which should be sent to the writer. Will advise him that shall come to stay as to the delivery of such letters as he [Throckmorton] sees meet.


Queen Elizabeth to the Cardinal of Lorraine” (August [8] 1559) SPO Part II
Recommends Sir Peter Mewtys, whom she sends to offer her condolence to King Francis II., on the death of his father.
A paper of intelligence” (June 6 1574) SPO Part I
A paper of intelligence. Conditions whereupon Sir Bryan McPhelim's pledges are delivered to the Earl of Essex. News from Antwerp and Holland. Death of Charles IX., and events in France.
Charles IX. of France” (1574) SPO Part II
Tract giving particulars of the ancestors and birth of Charles IX., the civil wars of his reign, his victories, the massacre of St. Bartholomew, his famous sayings, his wife and daughter, his decrees, his motto, his favorite servant, his master and nurse, his liberality, his sports, his study of music and singing, the fiery spectre seen by him, his breaking the law, his speech in the senate, his amours, his affliction of the, ecclesiastics, his study of liberal sciences, his food, drink, and sleep, a prodigy preceding his death, his sickness, his discourse before his death, his death and testament, description of his body and stature.
Edict by Charles IX” (Sept. 22 1572) SPO Part II
Prohibits all officers, magistrates, and administrators of justice and finance of the reformed religion from the execution of their respective offices on account of the distrust with which they are viewed by his Catholic subjects, and exhorts them to conform themselves to the Roman religion … All governors and officers are ordered to protect those who desire to return to the Catholic religion, and to severely punish such as molest them.—Paris.
Henry III. K. of Fr. to Courcelles; reprobating Q. Elizabeth's cruelty with regard…” (June 11, 1587.) SPO Part II
Henry III. K. of Fr. to Courcelles; reprobating Q. Elizabeth's cruelty with regard to the Q. of Scots. (Orig. French. countersigned Brulart.) Paris.
Henry III; his commission, approving of the marriage of the D. d'…” (Feb. 28 1581) SPO Part II
Henry III; his commission, approving of the marriage of the D. d'Anjou, with Q. Eliz. (an English translation.) St. Germain.
Paris. Henry III” (Dec. 14/24 1586) SPO Part II
Henry III., King of France, to M. de Courcelles. Expresses his satisfaction that the King of Scots is so earnest in behalf of his mother, a disposition that will procure him the respect of all the Princes in Christendom. Begs that he will constantly remind him that they who would kill his mother would not hesitate to essay the like upon himself. French.
Richard Scofeld to Walsingham” (Jul. 27 1589) SPO Part II
His honour has doubtless heard “these dolorous news,” now certainly affirmed, that “on Friday last, being the 23rd of July according to the style of England, the King of France was murdered by a Jacobin friar in a cloister by Pounthowse, with a dagger; a thing which is no small joy to the wicked Leaguers and truly will make a wonderful alteration in this state.
St. Germain. Henry IV., King of France, to the King of Scotland” (Nov. 16/26 1594) SPO Part II
Henry IV., King of France, to the King of Scotland. Conveying compliments, and expressing regret that he had not been able to assist at the baptism of the Prince, his son. French.
Original Letter of the Great King Henry IV” [no date] SPO Part II
Original Letter of the Great King Henry IV. of France (while King of Navarre) to Mr. Secretary Walsingham; all written in French, with his own hand.
Letters Patent of Henry IV of France to the Scots residing in his kingdom” (Before Mar. 21/31 1598-1599) SPO Part II
Henry, King of France and Navarre to all present and to come greeting. Whereas the late King Henry II by his letters patent of June 1557 [sic] granted to all inhabitants of the kingdom of Scotland subjects of the King the Dauphin of France his son and of the Queen of Scotland his wife to reside in this our kingdom and there to hold and possess benefices, dignities and ecclesiastical offices and to acquire moveable goods as they should think good as though they were originally natives, without anyone after their decease being able to claim the said goods by escheat (par droict d'aubayne), as has also been practised in Scotland where the French have the same right of naturalization, provided they be actual inhabitants of the kingdom (regnicolles) or dwelling in France
Catherine, Queen Mother of France, to Queen Elizabeth” (15 Aug 1589) SPO Part I
Catherine, Queen Mother of France, to Queen Elizabeth, concerning the marriage of her son, Amboise, Aug. 15, 1589. (French.)
Francis I., King of France, to King Edward VI” (Feb. 14 1546-7) SPO Part II
Francis I., King of France, to King Edward VI. Condoling with him on the death of his father, and expressing his satisfaction at the re-appointment of Dr. Wotton as Ambassador Resident in France.
Louise Queen of France to the Queen of Scots” (Oct. 28 1582) SPO Part II
Louise Queen of France to the Queen of Scots. Offers her consolation on her affliction and illness. Informs her of the King of France's intention to send the Sieur de la Mont towards the Queen of England, and to the Prince of Scotland her son. Fr.
Marriage of Princess Mary” (23 Sept 1514) SPO Part I
The ambassadors shall also say that he now sends his sister furnished with all things appertaining to so great a princess and they are ready to present her when the French King appoints a time for the solemnisation of the marriage: foreseeing always that they nowise deliver the Princess till the matrimony is celebrated. They take with them a minute approved by the King and Council of the French King's letters patent of the dower or donation propter nuptias, which they shall cause to be engrossed at the French Court; and they shall endeavour to get two copies signed and sealed with the French King's hand and great seal, so as to bring one with them at their return and leave the other with the French Queen.
Mary the French queen, to Card. Wolsey? requesting him to do her favour with her brother…” (Jan. 10, 1515) SPO Part II
Mary the French queen, to Card. Wolsey? requesting him to do her favour with her brother Hen. VIII. Paris?
Mary the French queen, to Henry VIII; five original letters…” (1515) SPO Part II
Mary the French queen, to Henry VIII; five original letters on her marriage with Suffolk.
The Queen of Navarre to Charles IX” (Feb. 11 1570) SPO Part II
Has received his letter and communicated his reply to her son and nephew, and the noblemen who are with them. Assures him that it is impossible for them to live without the free exercise of their religion, which in the end lie will be constrained to grant, and declares that all those who advise him otherwise are no true subjects to him.—La Rochelle.
Discourse in favour of the Queen's proposed marriage with the Duke of Anjou” (Dec. ? 1579) SPO Part I
Discourse in favour of the Queen's proposed marriage with the Duke of Anjou, vindicating him from slanders, showing his favour to the Protestant party in France.
Articles proposed on the part of the Duke of Anjou” (June 17 1579) SPO Part I
Articles proposed on the part of the Duke of Anjou, for marriage with Q. Elizabeth; and her answers to the same.
Latin verses, in which Q. Catherine de Medicis, is compared…” (1572) SPO Part II
Latin verses, in which Q. Catherine de Medicis, is compared to the worft female character in history: probably after the massacre of St. Barthelemy.
Catherine de Medicis to the Duke of Anjou” (Sept. 10 1569) SPO Part II
His letter to the King has just arrived announcing the raising of the siege of Poitiers with great honour to the Duke of Guise. Approves of his false attack upon Chatelherault which has been of great service.
A letter from Henry de Bourbon to the Lord Treasurer” (June 1574) SPO Part I
A letter from Henry de Bourbon, Prince of Condé, to the Lord Treasurer; requesting his support, and recommending the Vidame de Chartres. Strasburg, June, 1574. (French.)
Dr. Wotton, to the duke of Somerset; various intelligence. Paris,…” (July 23, 1540) SPO Part II
The college of cardinals, to the city of Paris; on the death…” (Oct. 16, 1591) SPO Part II
The college of cardinals, to the city of Paris; on the death of Gregory XIV. (Lat.) Oct. 16, 1591.
A letter of intelligence from Paris. (French.)” [no date] SPO Part I
Windebank to Cecill” (May 17 1562) SPO Part I
Windebank to Cecill. Understands that he wishes Mr. Thos. Cecill to continue at Paris rather than go to Flanders. The Ambassador advises they should remove to a house 7 leagues from Paris.
Windebank to Cecil”
In reply to his letter of the 12th January, he thinks that Mr. Thomas should not go as far as Languedoc or Guienne, but that it would be sufficient for him to see Orleans, Blois, Amboise, Tours, Angers, Nantes, and Poitiers, and so return to Paris.
An account of a show exhibited in Paris” (21 Sept 1581) SPO Part I
An account of a show exhibited in Paris, at the marriage of the Duke de Joyeux.
Intelligence from a spy at Rouen, to Wolsey. (French.) June and July, 1517” (June and July 1517) SPO Part II
Advertisements from Rouen of the preparations in Spain” (April 1588) SPO Part I
Advertisements from Rouen of the preparations in Spain. At Cadiz all French and Flemish ships were stayed till the departure of the Spanish fleet. Two hundred sail of ships were at Lisbon and more than 30,000 men ready to embark; fourteen of the greatest galleons at St. Lucars. The Duke of Medina had received sealed orders, to be opened at sea.
John Young to Cecill” (Nov. 16 1562) SPO Part I
John Young to Cecill. Fugitives from Dieppe. The King and his mother have left Rouen for Paris. Executions at Rouen. Reported death of the King of Navarre.
Articles proposed by deputies of the province of Normandy,…” [no date] SPO Part II
Articles proposed by deputies of the province of Normandy, in favour of the French merchants trading in England.
Note of money to be advanced on privy seals for the service in Brittany and Normandy” (July 1 1591) SPO Part I
Note of money to be advanced on privy seals for the service in Brittany and Normandy, with a note by Lord Burghley to Mr. Petre, to make an order upon the several privy seals mentioned, for payment thereof to Sir Thos. Sherley.
Method of payment of customs and other duties at Rouen, Nantes, Rochelle, Bordeaux, etc” [no date] SPO Part II
List of 24 ships prepared for the Bordeaux fleet” (1591?) SPO Part I
List of 24 ships prepared for the Bordeaux fleet, with their tonnage, masters' names, &c., two of which are to be sent from Newcastle. With notes of ships from six other ports, and other memoranda.
Wine” (1528) SPO Part I
Account of wines bought at Bordeaux… Wine of Orleans, 21 tuns, bought at Roane
The names of certain of the French nobility and gentry at Orleans” (1562) SPO Part I
The names of certain of the French nobility and gentry at Orleans.
Edict Of Orleans” ([March 19] 1563) SPO Part II
The King, with the assent of his Council, decrees religious toleration for the Huguenots under certain restrictions, in all places save Paris, and appoints the Prince of Condé Lieutenant-General of the realm, with indemnity for any of the royal revenues spent by him during the troubles.
Petition of the Papists of Orleans” ([April 20] 1563) SPO Part II
Certain Papist inhabitants of Orleans offer to put from 200 to 400 well armed men at the disposal of M. De Cipierre for the purpose of suppressing the Huguenots. This copy was made from the original by Nicholas Provenchiere and Francis Stuart, Notaries Royal at Orleans.
John Fitzwilliam to Cecil” (Jan. 4 1567) SPO Part II
Certain Protestants coming towards Valenciennes were set upon by the garrison of Lille, and some of those who lay about Valenciennes. It is said that between both parties there remained between 150 and 200 persona There is order taken for all the power the Regent can make to go towards Valenciennes
Throckmorton to the Queen” (Nov. 17 1560) SPO Part II
As he signified to Mr. Secretary by letters sent by the Laird of Torwoodhead, he [Throckmorton] staid at Paris until the passing of Du Bois, who passed with 1,500 men towards Angers and Nantes; as this gives great cause for suspicion the writer went to Orleans, where he arrived on the 4th, and immediately spoke with the Ambassador of Scotland…

A claim in the name of the Empire for restitution of the cities Metz, Toul, and Verdun” (1560) SPO Part I


A claim in the name of the Empire for restitution of the cities Metz, Toul, and Verdun, made at Blois, 1560.
Lord Grey to Queen Mary” (Jan. 4 1557-8) SPO Part II
The French have won Newnliam Bridge, and thereby entered all the low country and the marches between this and Calais. Also Ruisbank, whereby they are masters of that haven. Last night they planted their battery before Calais, and are encamped on St. Peter's heath before it. Is now cut off from all relief from England and Calais, and knows not how to have help of men or victuals. No hope now for Calais except by an immediate power out of England or from his Majesty sufficiently strong to distress them by land and sea, so as to compel them to raise the siege or drive them to greater danger.
Special commissioners to levy troops [for Calais]” (January 7 1558) SPO Part I
Norfolk - 1,500; Suffolk - 2,000: the duke of Norfolk. *[To the master of the rolls]. Essex - 1,500: the earl of Oxford, Lord Rich, [Sir Edward] Waldegrave. *[To the master of the rolls]. Sussex - 600; Surrey - 300: the earl of Arundel, Viscount Montagu. *[Delivered to Lord Montagu]…
Instructions from the queen to Sir William Woodhouse, vice-admiral [of England]” (January 8 1558) SPO Part I
Our ancient enemy the French king has not only besieged Calais but also distressed the marches, keeping that coast with his ships to prevent our subjects entering our town. For clearing the narrow seas, repair with all diligence to sea with as many of our ships as you may. Take with you the two Venetian ships which lie on the Foreland if you think them meet and have men to man them; else send them back to Woolwich. Such ships as you find on the Downs you may take with you if you think them meet. Take the 500 appointed out of London, the 200 of Middlesex and others of Essex. If these are not sufficient to man the ships, send to the lord warden to have more. If God gives you rule of the narrow seas, chase the enemy thence, put as many soldiers as you may by any means into Calais, and take others in place of them by order we have appointed.
Emanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy, to Queen Mary” (Jan. 16 1557-8) SPO Part II
Has received her letter of the 11th inst Will not express the pain which he felt at the loss of Calais, in order to spare her a renewal of the vexation which he considers she must suffer from it. When the news of the siege of that town reached him he left Brussels with intention to aid it. Since this is not possible, as it has pleased God to place it in the hands of the French, he will employ himself to the extent of his power in aiding the Castle of Guisnes, to which end she must hasten the passage of her forces and of the Earl of Pembroke. Has given order for arras and whatever else her troops may require. [French. One page.]
Massacre of St. Bartholomew” (Sept 1572) SPO Part II
…The murder [endured] at Paris above eight days without ceasing to murder men and women, and the opinion is there was slain above 3,000 persons, besides 400 gentlemen very brave and valiant and of great houses. On the 26 August they slew above 1,200 persons, besides women, at Orleans. In Lyons was the lib committed, putting the most part in prison, who were also slain. In the town of Meaulx they committed also a horrible murder. There is also a speech of the like in Bordeaux and Toulouse. In Rouen they put in prison 62 of the religion, the rest were in their houses, and on Wednesday, 18 Sept, about 4 a.m., the murderers went to the prison and by force commanded the jailor to deliver the prisoners to them, whereto he refused as much as he might.
List of women and children killed in Paris at the Massacre of St Bartholomew(24 Aug. 1572) SPO Part II
List of women and children killed in Paris at the Massacre of St Bartholomew; 24 Aug. 1572. French.

Nikki Chard for Julia de Mowbray, Publisher. July 2009



Enquiries or questions to julia.demowbray@cengage.com


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