St. Cloud State University General Education Goal Area 6



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St. Cloud State University General Education Goal Area 6 Humanities & Fine Arts

Academic Affairs Use Only:

Response Date:       Proposal Number:      

Effective Date:      

1. Prepared by: Paul Neiman

Phone: 4147936362 Email: pgneiman@stcloudstate.edu


2. Requesting Unit: Philosophy
3. Department, Course Number, Title: Philosophy 222 Existentialism
4. New Course  Existing Course 
5. Will this course be flagged as a diversity course?  No

 Already Designated as Diversity  Diversity Proposal Accompanying This Form


6. Will this course also satisfy another General Education Goal Area?  No  Yes

If “Yes” specify which goal area.

     
7. Course bulletin description, including credits and semesters to be offered:

PHIL 222. Existentialism

Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre on the human subject. Existential phenomenology, knowledge, truth, freedom, personal relations, authenticity and value. Prereq.: One of 111-194. 3 Cr. F, S, ALT.

8. Indicate the clientele for whom this course is designed. Is the course for general education only, or

does it fulfill general education and other program needs for this or another department? Obtain

signatures from any affected departments.

This course is intended for general education students. It also fulfills an elective requirement in the philosophy major and minor.
9. Indicate any changes that must be made in offerings or resources in your department or other

departments by offering this course.

No changes are needed.

10. For new courses or courses not yet approved for General Education, indicate any other SCSU departments

or units offering instruction that relates to the content of the proposed course.

Not applicable.

11. Courses designated as General Education are included in the assessment plan for the Goal Area(s)

for which they are approved. Courses for which assessment is not included in the annual GE assessment report for two years will be removed from the General Education Program.

 The Requesting Unit understands and recognizes the above conditions.

12. Provide a concise explanation of how the following goal is a “significant focus” of the proposed course.



Goal Area 6: Humanities & Fine Arts

Expand appreciation and critical understanding of changing modes of human expression and systems of thought in the arts and humanities, and develop abilities in the creation and performance of meaning.

The content covered in this course explores many issues related to human expression, meaning, and existence, including personal identity, free will, the nature of the human subject, and the meaning of existence.

13. In order for a course to be designated as fulfilling Goal Area 6, it must address at least 5 of the 7 student learning outcomes (SLOs) below. Check the SLOs below that are focused on in the proposed general education course.


 1. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.

 2. Describe and appreciate works in the arts and humanities as expressions of individual and collective values within an intellectual, cultural, historical and social context.

 3. Interpret and respond critically to works from various cultures in the arts and humanities.

 4. Explore intellectually the ideas expressed in works in the arts and humanities.

 5. Engage in creative processes or interpretive performance.

 6. Articulate an informed personal response to works in the arts and humanities.

 7. Analyze the diverse means of communication in the arts and humanities.

14. Discuss how each Student Learning Outcome checked above is achieved in this course. (Note: Although

descriptions of typical assignments or types of assignments may be part of this discussion, it is not

appropriate to submit copies of actual assignments.)

#1: Students are required to read texts encompassing a diverse range of perspectives and styles. Students may, for example, read plays by Jean-Paul Sartre, novels by Albert Camus, and philosophical papers by Soren Kierkegaard or Friedrich Nietzsche.

#2: Students will examine the values, or lack of values, of various existential philosophers covering many different topics, including the nature of the person, the existence and meaning of free will, the existence and meaning of God, and existential phenomenology. The works in which these values are expressed derive mainly from 19th through mid-twentieth century Europe and reflect intellectual developments in a post-Enlightenment context.

#3: In papers, tests, and/or class discussions, students will be required to interpret and critically evaluate the views and arguments of philosophers from a variety of perspectives and cultures. For example, students might study the divergent perspectives on God from philosophers in post-WWII France and mid-19th century Denmark.

#4: In papers, tests, and/or class discussions, students engage with philosophical views and concepts such as the existence and meaning of God, the nature of human freedom, phenomenology, and the nature of value. They draw out and evaluate the implications of these views and concepts, examine their presuppositions, and understand their connections.

#6: In papers, tests, and/or class discussions, students will be required to develop and explain their own point of view on existentialist issues noted above. They defend their views using the principles of philosophical analysis developed in the course. 

15. List or attach the Course Outline (adequately described and including percentage of time to be allocated

to each topic). Curriculum Committees may request additional information. Topics larger than 20% need

to be broken down further. Indicate in your course outline where the Student Learning Outcomes

checked above are being met.

20% Development of Student Views: Students will develop their own well-supported beliefs on a variety of existentialist issues. SLO# 4, 6

80% Existentialist Issues:(20% Free Will: students will study philosophical perspectives on the existence and meaning of free will from philosophers such as Jean-Paul Sartre or Albert Camus; 20% Existential phenomenology: students will study philosophical perspectives on existential phenomenology, this might include Jean-Paul Sartre or Martin Heideggar; 20% existence and meaning of God and faith: students will examine views of God and faith from philosophers such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Soren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche; 20% Personal relationships and authenticity: students will study various philosophical perspectives from philosophers such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Martin Heideggar and others.) SLO# 1, 2, 3, 4 
St. Cloud State University General Education Transmittal Form

Academic Affairs Use Only:

Response Date:       Proposal Number      

Effective Date:      


Department: Philosophy
Course or Course(s): Phil. 222 Existentialism



Carla A. H. Johnson February 10, 2010

Department or Unit Chair Signature Date


Department forward to Academic Affairs for publication and electronically to Chair of General Education Committee, Chair of College Curriculum Committee, College Dean

Recommendation of General Education Committee: Remarks:      


Approve Disapprove

Chairperson  

Committee  
           

Signature Date


Recommendation of University Curriculum Committee: Remarks:      


Approve Disapprove

Chairperson  

Committee  
           

Signature Date


Recommendation of Faculty Association: Remarks:      


Approve Disapprove

FA Senate  


           

Signature Date


Action of Academic Vice President: Remarks:      


Approve Disapprove

 
           



Signature Date
Entered in Curriculum Data File      

12/11/2009


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