Somers Public Schools Somers, ct 06071 2009 Summer Reading List Grades 6-12



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Somers Public Schools

Somers, CT 06071





2009

Summer Reading List

Grades 6-12
www.somers.k12.ct.us

Links on each of the school’s web pages

The Somers Summer Reading List is revised each year in late spring. The updated list will be published on the web site in May of each year.
Summer Reading List

Entering Grade 6
During the long, hot summer you will need to find a cool, comfortable place to curl up with a good book. You must choose two books from the list below and have them completely read when you return to school in September. During the first two weeks of school you will be required to participate in class discussions about the books you have read and present the worksheet you completed for each of the two books. The teachers have developed the worksheet to help you focus on key elements of the books as you read. Worksheets were given to you during Step-Up Day and extra worksheets are available in the Mabelle B. Avery Middle School Office. The teachers will collect the worksheets in September.
2010 Connecticut Nutmeg Book Award Intermediate Nominees

The Sixth Grade Summer Reading List is based on the 2010 Nutmeg Nominees for Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth grade readers. Students may also select books from the 2010 Nutmeg Nominees for Seventh and Eighth Grade readers.
Archer’s Quest by Linda Sue Park 



Facing another evening of dreary homework, Kevin Kim is startled by an unusual intruder. Standing before him is Koh Chu-Mong, an ancient Korean archer from the 1st century B.C. Kevin’s quest is to return this brave stranger to his own time within 24 hours or history will be changed forever.


Attack of the Turtle by Drew Carlson

Living on the Connecticut shoreline during the Revolutionary War, fourteen-year-old Nathan secretly helps his cousin, inventor David Bushnell, build the first submarine. Nathan must overcome his fears and Tory spies to help the Patriots fight the British.


A Dog’s Life: The Autobiography of a Stray by Ann M. Martin


Everything is comfortable in Squirrel’s world until her mother and brother disappear. Left on her own, she is forced to face many challenges from humans, other animals, and the elements. As days pass, Squirrel learns that her life will never be the same, but with all these obstacles, can she survive?


Double Identity by Margaret Peterson Haddix 



What would you do if your parents dropped you off at an unknown aunt’s house in the middle of the night, in an unknown town, where everyone you met looked at you as if they just saw a ghost? This is Bethany’s living nightmare, and it takes all her courage to slowly unravel the truth.


Drita, My Homegirl by Jenny Lombard



Drita emigrates to New York City from Kosovo.  During a social studies project, she meets Maxie, a native New Yorker who can’t seem to stay quiet in school.  What can two girls from such different worlds possibly have in common? More than you think. 


The Ghost’s Grave by Peg Kehret 



When twelve-year-old Josh apprehensively spends the summer in Washington state with his eccentric Aunt Ethel, he encounters the ghost of a one-legged coal miner. After stumbling upon a metal box of buried treasure, he solves the mystery of the box and finds out more about himself and his family



Paint the Wind by Pam Munoz Ryan 



Maya lives secluded in her grandmother’s overprotective care until an unexpected event sends her to Wyoming to meet her mother’s family. Maya learns about the mother she hardly remembers, and she encounters a wild herd of horses including a mare that her mother once rode.


Rules by Cynthia Lord 



If you have to tell your autistic brother “to keep his pants on in public,” how can you hope for a normal life? Catherine discovers that her own behavior with new neighbor Kristi and wheelchair-bound Jason make her look again at what “normal” really means.


The Stumptown Kid by Carol Gorman and Ron Findley 



Eleven-year-old Charlie Nebraska learns about friendship, heroism and racism when he meets a former Negro-league baseball player. Luther Peale ends up coaching Charlie’s team. Will this be the change they need to win against the premier team?


The Year of the Dog by Grace Lin 



Taiwanese-American Grace has high hopes that the Year of the Dog will bring her great luck. During Grace’s funny experiences throughout the year, she figures out what makes her unique and how she fits in with her family, friends, and classmates.



Summer Reading List

Entering Grade 7
Grade 7 Summer Reading 2009/2010

Ten Great Reads”


Read any two (2) from the following list:
Ida B …and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherin Hannigan (modern realistic fiction)

Most of Ida B's days are kind of perfect. She has a tranquil life, being home schooled by her loving parents and spending her days exploring their land and talking to her best friends, the mountain, the brook, and her family’s apple trees. This all changes when Ida B's mother discovers she has cancer. Soon her hospital bills mean that Ida B's dad must sell part of their land and Ida B will have to go to regular school. Right then and there, Ida B decides to harden her heart, shut out her parents, her classmates, and the new family building a house on what used to be her apple orchard. It takes time, love, and the quiet patience of the perfect teacher before Ida B can open up her heart again.


The Convicts by Iain Lawrence (historical fiction)

After seeing his father hauled off to debtor’s prison, Tom Tin sets out to take revenge on Mr. Goodfellow, the man responsible for his family’s misfortunes. But the fog-filled London streets are teeming with sinister characters. Tom is mistaken for someone ominously known as the Smasher. Ultimately, Tom comes up against the cruel hand of the law. Accused of murder, Tom is given a seven-year sentence to Van Diemen’s Land where he decides to escape. But if he’s to succeed, his luck needs to turn.


So. B. It by Sarah Weeks (modern realistic fiction)

Heidi and her mentally challenged mother have lived in an apartment that is next to their neighbor, Bernadette, since the twelve-year-old was probably no more than a week old.  Bernadette accepted and loved them from the moment they arrived at her door. Heidi struggles with knowing nothing about her father or her family history, and never having a real last name.  Then she finds an old camera, which prompts her quest to learn the identity of the people in the photographs. Heidi relies on her luck, instinct, and the people she meets on the way to learn the truth about her mother and past.


The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (science fiction)

America has been destroyed and replaced by Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by 12 starving Districts. In the past, the Districts attempted to overthrow the Capitol, only to be defeated. The annual Hunger Games, in which two children from each of the districts are chosen to participate in a televised fight-to-the-death match, are the Capitol's way of reminding the Districts who has control. The winner's district is showered with food at the end of the Games, thus giving the children incentive to fight. And so The Hunger Games begin...


The Ruins of Gorlan (Ranger’s Apprentice-Book 1) by John Flanagan (fantasy)

He had always wanted to be a warrior. The Rangers, with their dark cloaks and shadowy ways, made him nervous. The villagers believe the Rangers practice magic that makes them invisible to ordinary people. And now fifteen year-old Will, always small for his age, has been chosen as a Ranger's apprentice. What he doesn't realize yet is that the Rangers are the protectors of the kingdom. Highly trained in the skills of battle and surveillance, they fight the battles before the battles reach the people. And as Will is about to learn, there is a large battle brewing.



Schooled by Gordon Korman (realistic fiction)

Capricorn Anderson, Cap for short, has always lived at Garland Farm.  He has been home schooled by his grandmother, Rain, and has never met another human being.  Then one day his grandmother falls and breaks her hip.  Suddenly, Cap is living in a house with a surly teenager and a social worker.  But it isn’t there that things go awry.  For the first time in his 13 years he is in school.  As a prank, he is voted 8th grade class president and is told about all his “responsibilities.”  But Cap amazes everyone and soon he has 1/2 the school working on the Halloween Dance, a group doing tai chi with him every morning, and a fun filled art class where everyone tie dyes. But there are people out to get him and he is too clueless to survive.  Can he survive in the real world?


The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne (historical fiction)

Nine year-old Bruno knows nothing of the Holocaust. He is not aware of the cruelty and suffering by the Jews. He only knows that his family has to move from his wonderful home in Berlin and now he has no-one to play with at his new home. Then he meets Shmuel, a boy who lives a strange world on the other side of an adjoining wire fence. Like the other people there, he wears a uniform of striped pajamas.  Bruno's friendship with Shmuel will take him from innocence to understanding.


Hope Was Here by Joan Bauer (modern realistic fiction)

Fourteen-year-old Hope is a great waitress. She takes pride in making people happy with good food, as does her Aunt Addie, a diner cook extraordinaire. The two of them have been a pair ever since Hope's waitress mother abandoned her as a baby. Now they have come to rural Wisconsin to run the Welcome Stairways Café for G.T. Stoop. He is dying of leukemia, but he's not dead yet. The kind restaurant owner demonstrates that when he decides to run for mayor against the corrupt Eli Millstone. The campaign leads Hope in exciting new directions: a boyfriend, a new sense of herself, and, when Addie and G.T. finally realize that they are meant for each other, the father she has always wanted. A delicious and heartwarming story.


Keeper by Mal Pete (modern realistic fiction/fantasy)

When Paul Faustino flips on his tape recorder for an exclusive interview with El Gato — the phenomenal soccer goalkeeper who single-handedly brought his team the World Cup — the seasoned reporter quickly learns that this will be no ordinary story. Instead, the legendary El Gato narrates a spellbinding tale that begins in the South American rainforest, where a ghostly but very real mentor, the Keeper, emerges to teach a poor, gawky boy the most thrilling secrets of the game.


Montmorency: Thief, Liar, Gentleman? by Eleanor Updale (historical fiction)

In a London cellblock in 1875, career criminal Montmorency is serving time for burglary. Captured while fleeing police, Montmorency suffered several horrible wounds that attract the attention of a brilliant young doctor. When the doctor displays Montmorency's newly healed body, Montmorency overhears a presentation on the city's new sewer system that will change his life forever. Once released from prison, Montmorency uses his knowledge of the underground tunnels to steal from some of London's wealthiest neighborhoods. But in order to enjoy his new riches he must assume an alternate personality as the drain-dwelling Scarper.



Grade 7

Summer Bookmarks





Summer Reading 2009/2010

Five Good Questions


Directions:



#1 Where and when does the novel take place?
#2 Choose one good word to describe the main character in your novel. Find three examples (use quotes) from the novel to support your response.
#3 Describe the problem your character faces in the novel.
#4 What is the solution to the character’s problem in the novel?
#5 What does the main character learn about life at the end of the novel?


Summer Reading 2009/2010


Five Good Questions


Directions:


  • Word process (type) answers

  • Use complete sentences

  • Return on the first day of school





#1 Where and when does the novel take place?
#2 Choose one good word to describe the main character in your novel. Find three examples (use quotes) from the novel to support your response.
#3 Describe the problem your character faces in the novel.
#4 What is the solution to the character’s problem in the novel?
#5 What does the main character learn about life at the end of the novel?


Summer Reading 2009/2010


Five Good Questions


Directions:


  • Word process (type) answers

  • Use complete sentences

  • Return on the first day of school





#1 Where and when does the novel take place?
#2 Choose one good word to describe the main character in your novel. Find three examples (use quotes) from the novel to support your response.
#3 Describe the problem your character faces in the novel.
#4 What is the solution to the character’s problem in the novel?
#5 What does the main character learn about life at the end of the novel?



Summer Reading List

Entering Grade 8

2009
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body” – Joseph Addison
Just as exercise builds stronger muscles, reading builds a stronger brain. Reading helps us to better understand our world and the people in it. Reading can take you to amazing places and help you find out about anything you want to learn. Regular reading is just the smart thing to do.
Around the second week of school, you will be tested on the two books you have read. Use specific story details to complete the 5 W’s organizers attached. The charts will be used to complete a test on one of the readings and to write an essay on the other.
Inkheart by Cornelia Funke – 12 year-old Meggie learns that her father Mo, a bookbinder, can “read” fictional characters to life when an evil ruler named Capricorn, freed from the novel “Inkheart” years earlier, tries to force Mo to release an immortal monster from the story. Challenging

Also consider the sequels: Inkspell or Inkdeath


Ask No Questions by Marina Budhos – Nadira and her family are illegal aliens fleeing to the Canadian border – running from the country they thought was their home. For years since emigrating from Bangladesh, they have lived on expired visas in New York City, hoping that someday they would realize their dream of becoming legal citizen of the US. But after 9/11, everything changes. Suddenly, being Muslim means being dangerous, a suspected terrorist. Easy
Stones in the Water by Donna Jo Napoli - After being taken away by German soldiers from a local movie theater along with boys including his Jewish friend, Roberto is forced to work in Germany, escapes into the Ukrainian winter, before desperately trying to make his way back home. Easy

Sequel: Fire in the Hills


The Wave by Todd Strasser Based on a true incident, this novel reveals the powerful forces of group pressure that are initiated by a classroom experiment that gets out of hand. Moderate
Somewhere in the Darkness by Walter Dean Myers – A teenage boy accompanies his father, who has recently escaped from prison, on a trip that turns out to be a time of discovery, often painful, for them both. Moderate
Girl in Blue by Ann Rinaldi – The year is 1861. When a spirited teenager learns that she is to be married off to her despicable neighbor, she runs away from home. Disguising herself as a boy, she boldly decides to join the army – and before long is a soldier in the Civil War. Moderate
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Bette Smith – A young girl comes of age in the squalor and poverty of the Brooklyn slums. Challenging
The Land by Mildred D. Taylor – The story is set in the years following the Civil War. Paul, the son of a white father and a black mother, finds himself caught between the two worlds as he pursues his dream of owning land of his own. Moderate
Soldier’s Heart by Gary Paulsen – Eager to enlist, fifteen year-old Charley has a change of heart after experiencing both the physical horrors and mental anguish of Civil War combat. Easy (May be read only with Resource Room teacher recommendation)

Summer Reading List

Entering Grade 8

2009

Name:
Title: _______________________________________

Author: ____________________________________
Review the following questions and take notes as you read. You may use a bullet format. Your notes should be concrete with specific details, as you will be allowed to use these notes for the in-class assessments on the books you have read. Use additional paper if needed.
5 W’s and How Question Frame
WHO: (Physical and personality characteristics)

Main characters:



WHAT:

Main problems or conflicts: (Include main events of plot.)

Message or theme: (What is the message the author wants us to understand about the character’s change?)

SETTING -
WHERE:

Setting (place): (Use descriptive details.)



WHEN:

Setting (time):



HOW:

How does the main character deal with each of the conflicts he/she faces?

Are the conflicts resolved in the end?


WHY: (connections)

Does the book remind you of any other books (or movies, TV shows, etc.) you have read?

Does it remind you of a situation you or someone you know has been in?

SUMMARY:

Write a summary of the plot in 10 sentences.






SOMERS HIGH SCHOOL
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH—SUMMER READING LIST

ENTERING GRADE 9


Honors English 9: Read the two (2) * required books plus one other.

*Christie, Agatha. And Then There Were None A pathological killer systematically murders ten strangers entrapped on an island.

*Buck, Pearl. The Good Earth Modern classic of life in China as revealed through the life of one peasant family.

Bradbury, Ray. Something Wicked This Way Comes October is the season of mystery and dying, and when Halloween brings the Pandemonium Shadow Show to town, two fourteen-year-old boys discover its secrets.

Gunther, John. Death Be Not Proud Gunther’s moving story of his son’s courageous battle to overcome cancer.

Herriot, James. All Creatures Great and Small Warm account of the author’s first years as a veterinarian.

Hilton, James. Lost Horizon Four people are brought against their will to mysterious Shangri-La, a place where no one grows old.

Knowles, John. A Separate Peace Two adolescents come to understand each other and themselves after a tragic accident.

McCullers, Carson. A Member of the Wedding A sensitive portrayal of twelve-year-old tomboy Frankie and the turbulent emotions triggered by her brother’s coming marriage.

Shakespeare, William. The Tempest – “An exiled duke employs magic to recover his domain. This eloquent, highly crafted play marked the culmination of Shakespeare’s dramatic career.” Magill Book Reviews. New York: Salem Press, 1995.



College English 9: Read any two (2) of the books listed below.

Graphic Organizer must be used.


Kimmel, Haven. A Girl Named Zippy: Growing Up Small in Mooreland Indiana – An engaging and funny memoir about growing up in small-town America.
Bradbury, Ray  Fahrenheit 451 Unsettling view of the future in which all books are banned or burned. 

 

Bradbury, Ray.  Something Wicked This Way Comes October is the season of mystery and dying, and when Halloween brings the Pandemonium Shadow Show to town, two fourteen-year-old boys discover its secrets.


Christie, Agatha.  And Then There Were None A pathological killer systematically murders ten strangers entrapped on an island.

 

Doyle, Sir Arthur ConanThe Hound of the Baskervilles The most famous adventure of the peerless detective Sherlock Holmes concerns a family living under the ancient curse of a spectral hound.


Haddon, Mark. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-TimeChristopher is mathematically gifted, screams when touched, cannot eat yellow or brown foods, and is wrongfully accused of killing his neighbor’s poodle. What follows is a unique and enlightening voyage into the world of a fifteen-year-old autistic boy as he recounts the journey to clear his name.

 

Herriot, James.  All Creatures Great and Small Warm account of the author’s first years as a veterinarian.

  

Stevenson, Robert Louis. Treasure Island A thrilling story of buried treasure, piracy, and derring-do in days past.

 

Wells, H.G.  The Time Machine The Time Traveler is transported into the distant future and learns a devastating truth about humanity.


Donnelly, Jennifer. A Northern Light – It's 1906, and Mattie Gokey is excited to escape the family farm to take on her first real job at a fancy hotel in the Adirondacks. Her plans for the future are fuzzy as she decides if the end of the summer will mean she goes to college at prestigious Barnard, feel compelled to return to her family farm, or be tempted to continue her romance with handsome Royal. Life gets complicated when there is a murder at the hotel, and Mattie is unwittingly involved.
Myers, Walter Dean. Sunrise Over Fallujah Robin “Birdy” Perry, a young man from Harlem, is unsure of why he joined the Army. The only thing he does know is that he is headed to Iraq to assist in securing and stabilizing the country through Operation Iraqi Freedom. In the midst of war, Birdy and his fellow recruits quickly learn of survival and despair and that they may need to reconsider their definition of “winning.”
Zusak, Markus. The Book Thief – Narrated in the darkly humorous yet surprisingly compassionate voice of Death, The Book Thief is an unusual yet moving novel. Liesel Meminger grows up in Holocaust-era Germany and steals books as a means of distraction from the chaos of the world around her, all the while collecting a peculiar set of friends. Although he fears humans, Death cannot resist the impact young Liesel has on his life.


ENTERING GRADE 10


Honors English 10: Read any three (3) of the books listed below.

Graphic Organizer must be used


Lee, Harper.  To Kill a Mockingbird The unconditioned and unconditional wisdom of children is shown to be superior in this story of conflict between black and white.

 

Williams, Tennessee. The Glass Menagerie (play) – Williams’s drama chronicles the turmoil of Amanda Wingfield, who, clinging to another time and place, cannot help her children take their place in the real world.


Cather, WillaMy Antonia Against Nebraska’s panoramic landscape, Cather recreates the life of an immigrant girl who becomes the epitome of strong and dignified womanhood.

 

Hemingway, ErnestA Farewell to Arms One of the most poignant love stories ever written.  Set in World War I Italy.

 

Kingsolver, Barbara.  The Bean Trees Taylor Greer flees her harsh life in Appalachia and heads west in this memorable novel of love and friendship, abandonment and belonging.
Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the Rye – Cynical and humorous Holden Caulfield, kicked out of yet another prep school, takes a journey through New York City and shares his observations about life, love, phonies, and much more in this iconic novel of the coming-of-age experience.

 

Steinbeck, John.  The Grapes of Wrath Powerful chronicle of dispossessed landowners who leave Oklahoma during the Great Depression and head for the “promised land” of California.

 

Walker, AliceThe Color Purple – Triumphant novel of a black woman’s life in the South.

  

Wright, Richard.  Native Son Powerful novel about a black youth from the Chicago slums victimized because of his race.  It reflects the forces of poverty, injustice, race and class that continue to shape society.


Frazier, Charles. Cold Mountain – Inman, a Confederate soldier trying to escape the chaos and cruelty of war, makes a daring attempt to return to his home in the Blue Ridge Mountains while his love, Ada, struggles to survive alone on her father's farm. Moving and full of adventure, Frazier's characters are transformed as they experience the best and worst of humanity.
 












College English 10: Read any two (2) of the books listed below.

Graphic Organizer must be used.


Kidd, Sue Monk.  The Secret Life of Bees Set in South Carolina in 1964, this novel tells the story of fourteen-year-old Lily Owens, who leaves home with her fierce-hearted black “stand-in-mother” in search of the secret to her mother’s past.
Shaara, Michael. The Killer Angels – This Pulitzer prize-winning novel provides a deep understanding of the events at the Battle of Gettysburg. Shaara’s account of the three most important days of the Civil War features excellent characterizations and reflects the bravery of the Union and Rebel soldiers at Little Round Top.
Kingsolver, Barbara.  The Bean Trees Taylor Greer flees her harsh life in Appalachia and heads west in this memorable novel of love and friendship, abandonment and belonging.

Rinaldi, Ann. A Break with Charity: A Story about the Salem Witch Trials Susanna English, daughter of a wealthy Salem merchant, recalls the malice, fear, and accusations of witchcraft that tore her village apart in 1692.


Asinof, Eliot.  Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series – It’s all here: the players, the shame, and the damage the 1919 World Series caused America’s national pastime.

 

Gaines, Ernest J.  A Lesson Before Dying – Tells of the relationship forged between a young black man on death row and his teacher in 1940s Louisiana.  Together they come to understand the heroism of resisting.




Anderson, M.T. The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume I: The Pox Party Octavian is a young African boy living in Revolution-era Boston with his mother, an exiled princess. Raised in isolation by a group of nameless radical philosophers known only by numbers, Octavian begins to realize that he is being held captive as part of a horrific experiment and comes to understand what it means to be a slave.
Dunn, Mark. Ella Minnow Pea: A Novel in Letters - Ella Minnow Pea is a girl living happily on the fictional island of Nollop off the coast of South Carolina. Nollop was named after Nevin Nollop, author of the immortal pangram,* “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” Now Ella must save her friends, family, and fellow citizens from the encroaching totalitarianism of the island’s Council, which has banned the use of certain letters of the alphabet as they fall from a memorial statue of Nevin Nollop. *pangram: a sentence or phrase that includes all the letters of the alphabet
Frazier, Charles. Cold Mountain – Inman, a Confederate soldier trying to escape the chaos and cruelty of war, makes a daring attempt to return to his home in the Blue Ridge Mountains while his love, Ada, struggles to survive alone on her father's farm. Moving and full of adventure, Frazier's characters are transformed as they experience the best and worst of humanity.

Picoult, Jodi. Plain Truth – Eighteen year-old Katie, an unmarried Amish girl, is accused of having given birth to an infant that she then smothered, yet despite medical evidence, she denies both the birth and death of the child. Her lawyer, Ellie Hathaway, moves to the farm to better understand the Amish way of life and quickly learns that truth, justice, and the “American way” have a very different meaning within the closed community of the “plain.”

ENTERING GRADE 11


Honors English 11: Read the two (2) * required books plus one other.
*White, T.H.  The Once and Future King Arthurian legend; focuses on human weakness, dreams versus reality, hungering for an ideal, might versus right. Begins with the story of “The Sword in the Stone.”

 

*Orwell, George.  1984 – A chilling, prophetic vision of a totalitarian “future” which, in many respects, has come to pass.

 

McCourt, Frank. Angela’s Ashes Angela's Ashes follows the experiences of young Frankie and his family as they try against all odds to escape the poverty endemic in the slums of pre-war Limerick.

 

Austen, Jane.  Sense and Sensibility Two high-spirited sisters search for true love in a strait-laced society.

 

Brontë, Emily.  Wuthering Heights A savage, tormented orphan falls in love with the daughter of his benefactor.

 

Dickens, Charles.  Oliver Twist The moving tale of an orphan who must make his way through the horrors of London’s sinister underworld.

 

Swift, Jonathan. Gulliver’s Travels Generations learn the failings of man from his travel story to fantastic lands.

College English 11: Read the * required book plus one other.
*du Maurier, Daphne. Rebecca – Chronicles the nameless narrator’s marriage to Maxim de Winter, which is overshadowed by the memory of his first wife, Rebecca, who was killed in a mysterious sailing accident.
Orwell, George.  1984 A chilling, prophetic vision of a totalitarian “future” which, in many respects, has come to pass.
Brontë, Charlotte.  Jane Eyre The searching portrayal of a passionate mid-nineteenth-century woman.

 

Greene, Graham. The Tenth Man The moral struggle of a lawyer held prisoner during WWII who trades his wealth for his life, letting another man die in his place.


Wilde, Oscar.  The Picture of Dorian Grey Dorian Grey is tempted into a cynical and amoral life with his willingness to sell his soul for vanity.

 

Shakespeare, William.  All’s Well that Ends Well (play) Comedy of the triumph of love over obstacles.



Academic English 11: Read any two (2) of the following books:

Murdock, Catherine. Dairy Queen – After spending her summer running the family farm and training the quarterback for her school's rival football team, sixteen-year-old D.J. decides to go out for the sport herself, not anticipating the reactions of those around her.
Cormier, Robert. The Rag and Bone Shop – Trent, an ace interrogator from Vermont, works to procure a confession from an introverted twelve-year-old accused of murdering his seven-year-old friend in Monument, Massachusetts.
Halberstam, David. Firehouse (Non-fiction) – "In the firehouse, the men not only live and eat with each other, they play sports together, go off to drink together, help repair one another's house, and, most important, share terrifying risks; their loyalties to each other must, by the demands of the dangers they face, be instinctive and absolute." This is the story of the dozen men from FDNY Engine 40 Ladder 35 who were lost at the World Trade Center on 9/11/01, and the morning that united them forever.
Giles, Gail. Shattering Glass – Rob, the charismatic leader of the senior class, provokes unexpected violence when he turns the school nerd into Prince Charming. "Suspenseful, disturbing..." (Publisher's Weekly).
Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the RyeCynical and humorous Holden Caulfield, kicked out of yet another prep school, takes a journey through New York City and shares his observations about life, love, phonies, and much more in this iconic novel of the coming-of-age experience.
Chbosky, Stephen.  The Perks of Being a Wallflower The author captures the voice of a boy teetering on the brink of adulthood.  He’s a wallflower—shy and introspective, and intelligent beyond his years, if not very savvy in the social arts.

O’ Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried – The protagonist, who is named, Tim O’Brien begins by describing an event that occurred in the middle of his Vietnam experience. The Things They Carried catalogs the variety of things his fellow soldiers in the Alpha Company brought on their missions.
McMann, Lisa.  Wake – Going to sleep isn’t a big deal for most of us, but for Janie, falling asleep means getting sucked into other people’s dreams.  The supernatural ability she’s always considered a nuisance quickly becomes a nightmare when she blunders into a dream and witnesses a murder.

  

 



ENTERING GRADE 12
Advanced Placement English 12: Read the two (2)* required books plus one other
*Paton, Alan. Cry, The Beloved Country – The most famous and important novel in South Africa's history, an impassioned novel about a black man's country under white man's law. It is the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son Absalom set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. The novel is a classic work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.
*Shakespeare, William. Othello (play) – Tragedy about distrust and jealousy.
Austen, Jane. Northanger Abbey – The story of Catherine Morland, who is mistakenly invited to an isolated country manor, where she falls in love with the young man of the house.
Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man – One of the lasting masterpieces of American literature. It chronicles the existential journey of an unnamed black man attempting to discover his identity and role in a hostile and confusing world that refuses to acknowledge his existence.
Hardy, Thomas. Return of the Native –Thomas Hardy's sixth novel and probably his best known. In fact, many critics assert that Eustacia Vye is one of the most memorable characters in English literature. The story focuses on the lives and loves of residents in the fictional county of Wessex, England, a setting based upon on the rural area where Hardy was raised.
Heller, Joseph. Catch 22 – A savagely funny war novel: military madness and civilian insanity in World War II.
Joyce, James. Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man – Story of an Irish Catholic boy growing up in Dublin.
Remarque, Erich Maria. All Quiet on the Western Front – Experiences of bewildered German soldiers fighting and suffering through the chaos of World War I.
Tolstoy, Leo. Anna Karenina – Set in nineteenth-century Russia, the moving story of people whose emotions conflict with the dominant social mores of their time.

College English 12: Read any two (2) from the following list:
Beah, Ishmael. A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier – Child soldiers are being used as human pawns in dozens of conflicts around the world. Indeed, the figures are staggering: as many as 300,000 children are currently fighting in wars. Behind these distressing figures, of course, are real-life children, some as young as eight. Journalistic reconstructions can take us only so far into the lives of these boys; we had to wait for this firsthand account by Sierra Leone native Ishmael Beah to truly understand this ghastly, life-shattering practice. Beah was only 13 when he was handed an AK-47 and sent off to the killing fields. This book is a bracing memoir about a survivor in a world gone mad.
Hamill, Pete. Snow in August – Story of a young Catholic boy named Michael in Brooklyn who, after the death of his father in WWII, builds an unlikely friendship with a poor rabbi. The rabbi learns about America and baseball. Michael learns about life and the hard choices one must make to maintain a strong faith and a sense of self-respect.
Hosseini, Khaled. The Kite Runner – Taking us from Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy to the present, The Kite Runner is the unforgettable story of the friendship between two boys growing up in Kabul. Raised in the same household, Amir and Hassan grow up in different worlds: Amir is the son of a prominent and wealthy man, while Hassan, the son of Amir's father's servant, is a Hazara -- a shunned ethnic minority. Their intertwined lives, and their fates, reflect the eventual tragedy of the world around them. When Amir and his father flee the country for a new life in California, Amir thinks that he has escaped his past. And yet he cannot leave the memory of Hassan behind him.
Mortenson, Greg and David Oliver Relin. – Three Cups of Tea: One Man’s Mission to Promote Peace…One School at a Time--On the afternoon of September 2, 1993, Greg Mortenson realized that he had failed in his attempt to climb K2, the world's second-highest mountain. But disappointment was the least of his problems. Emaciated, exhausted, thoroughly disoriented, and suffering from edema, his grip on life was loosening. He was taken in and nursed back to health by the impoverished populace of a remote Pakistani village. Grateful, he promised to return someday to build them a school. Three Cups of Tea is the story of that promise and the story of how one man changed the world, one school at a time.
Paton, Alan. Cry, the Beloved Country – The most famous and important novel in South Africa's history, an impassioned novel about a black man's country under white man's law. It is the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son Absalom set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. The novel is a classic work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.

Shakespeare, William. Othello (play) – Tragedy about distrust and jealousy.
Sophocles. Oedipus Rex (play) – The first of three tragic plays which tells the downfall of Oedipus, King of Thebes.
Wharton, Edith. Summer – Trapped in her existence in the decaying town of North Dormer, and living with her much older guardian under the shadow of a mysterious personal past, 18-year-old Charity Royall finds her life changed when a young architect walks into the library where she works. This story is about a young girl’s rite of passage into adulthood.
Williams, Tennessee. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (play) – A drama of greed, frustration,and guilt in the emotionally charged atmosphere of a family reunion.



Academic English 12: *Read the required book plus one other.
*Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men – George has agreed to help take care of Lennie. Lennie has difficulty learning, and he doesn’t know his own strength. What seems like a fun task at first for George transforms into an enormous responsibility.
Asher, Jay. Thirteen Reasons Why. We can learn many life lessons from the living, but can we learn from the dead? Hannah Baker leaves behind several tapes after her suicide, which forces others to contemplate if they contributed to her death. What these tapes reveal could change many lives, but how many will dare to press play and confront both the past and the present?
Flinn, Alex. Breathing Underwater – Alex has been informed that anger management classes are mandatory, but he thinks this is ridiculous. Was he really out of control? Alex reveals his side of the story through his journals and flashbacks of time spent with his girlfriend, Caitlin. The male perspective of a challenging high school relationship is revealed.
McNamee, Graham. Acceleration—Duncan is miserable working in the lost and found department in the subway station until suddenly he discovers a diary. While at first he is intrigued by the journal which seems like a scrapbook of tragic events, Duncan quickly realizes he could be holding evidence that could lead him to a crime scene or even worse.
Sebold, Alice. Lucky – Sebold is also the author of the best seller, Lovely Bones. Lucky is a memoir of a college freshman who endures a traumatic, life-altering event. Her struggle for understanding, hope, and resolution is a passionate account.
Spielgman, Art. Maus – A holocaust survivor’s tale that will capture your attention quickly. A graphic novel which documents the horrific and terrifying experience but also the resilience and courage of many. The cartoon format, which incorporates cats to represent the Nazis and mice to represent the Jews, does not minimize the experience, but rather conveys the remarkable history in a revolutionary and dynamic portrayal.




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