Social Studies Lesson – tah: Professor Luca – Fall 2010



Download 36.25 Kb.
Date conversion03.05.2016
Size36.25 Kb.
Teacher’s Name: Carla Bendayan TO: rbrazofsky@dadeschools.net

Employee Number: 263186



School: Ada Merritt K-8

Social Studies Lesson – TAH: Professor Luca – Fall 2010

  1. Title: Benjamin Franklin: Feminism in Colonial America – 8th grade

  2. Overview - Big Ideas:

Enduring Understandings (It is important for student to understand this because…….)

  • Understand that men and women did not share the same rights in early America.

  • Understand the role of women in Colonial America.

  • Understand that not many men believed that women should have more rights in early America.

  • Understand that Benjamin Franklin was a man ahead of his time as he advocated women’s rights through several of his writings.

  • Appreciate Benjamin Franklin not only as a key Founding Father, but also one of the first male to promote women’s rights in early America.

Essential Questions – (What provocative questions will you use to foster inquiry, understanding and transfer of learning?)

  • How can we compare and contrast men’s and women’s rights and duties in Colonial America?

  • Why did men and women have different roles in society?

  • How did Benjamin Franklin defend women’s rights?

  • Do men and women share equality in today’s society?

  1. Lesson Objectives:

Standards - (Next Generation Sunshine State Standards – Encourage everyone to register and use http://www.floridastandards.org/Homepage/index.aspx?Redirected=1

SS.8.A.1. 3

Analyze current events relevant to American history topics through a variety of electronic and print media resources.

SS.8.A.1.4

Differentiate fact from opinion; utilize appropriate historical research and fiction/nonfiction support materials.

SS.8.A.1.5

Identify, with both primary and secondary sources, the author, audience, format, and purpose of significant historical documents.

SS.8.A.1.7

View historic events through the eyes of those who were there as shown in their art, writings, music, and artifacts.

SS.8.A.3.5

Describe the influence of individuals on social and political developments during the Revolutionary era.

4. Key Vocabulary: rights, privileges, duties, role, equality, feminism, pen name, anonymous…

5. Evidence of Student Understanding (Assessment) in this Lesson:

What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this lesson?

Students will be able to understand that men and women did not share the same rights in early America as society was driven by male interests. Students should also be able to compare and contrast the social roles of men and women in Colonial America. Students should be able to explain how Benjamin Franklin believed in women’s rights in early America. (Written Assignment: Summative)



What will students be able to do as a result of such knowledge and skills?

Students will be able to compare and contrast the different roles of men and women in Early America. (Oral Questions & Answers and Smart Board Comparative Chart: Formative)

Students will be able to explain how Benjamin Franklin influenced women’s rights through his writings. (Written Assignment: Summative)


  1. Materials Needed: (Include primary sources you will use in this lesson)

Primary Sources:

“Silence Dogood: Benjamin Franklin in the New-England Courant” (Oct. 22, 2010)

“The Speech of Miss Polly Baker” (Engendered America # 36) (Oct. 22, 2010)

Secondary Sources:

Carol Berkin. First Generations: Women in Colonial America (New York, Hill and Wang, 1997)

Textbook & Smart Board



  1. Steps to Deliver the Lesson:

A detailed, step by step description of how to deliver the lesson and achieve the lesson plan objectives. These should be sufficiently clear so that another teacher could implement the lesson without guidance.

Lesson Opening: Teacher will ask question about equality in today’s society. Teacher will ask students to compare and contrast men’s and women’s roles in our society today and in the 1700s. Teacher will ask if there were many men that believed that women should have more rights in early American and why.

Reading:

  1. Teacher will read an excerpt of Carol Berkin’s First Generations: Women in Colonial America in which the author argues that there was a diversity of female’s roles in the pre-revolutionary American colonies due to the differences in race, region, religion and class.

  2. Students will discuss men’s and women’s roles in early America.

  3. Teacher will project a comparison chart/Venn Diagram in the Smart Board. Students will complete it analyze it in the Smart Board.

  4. Teacher will project in the Smart Board selected Benjamin Franklin’s writings in which he defended women’s rights. Students will underline, analyze and discuss the feminist ideas in his writings.

  5. Finally, students will be able to explain the main idea of Franklin’s writings “Silence Dogood” & “The Speech of Miss Polly Baker” (Written Assignment: Summative)

  1. Specific Activities: (From Guided to Independent)

List and/or describe the activities designed to facilitate the gradual release of teacher responsibility, from teacher-led to independent

  1. After oral questions and answers, students will complete the compare & contrast chart/Venn diagram in the Smart Board referent to men’s and women’s roles in early America.

  2. Students will summarize Franklin’s writings of “Silence Dogood” & “The Speech of Miss Polly Baker” and analyze their main ideas.

  3. ESL Students will pair with another student for assistance.

  4. Teacher will circulate the room to assist students.

  5. Teacher will call volunteers to share their findings, key words and review the vocabulary words.

  1. Differentiated Instruction Strategies:

Describe how you will accommodate a variety of student learning needs, remediation strategies as well as enrichment strategies.

While teacher is circulating the room, she will assist the students who are having difficulties in comparing and contrasting the roles of men and women in Colonial America, and when summarizing the writings of Franklin.



  1. Technology Integration:

Describe activities incorporating technology; e.g., address lesson content through online resources.

Teacher will access the writings of Benjamin Franklin in the Smart Board:



“Silence Dogood: Benjamin Franklin in the New-England Courant” (Oct. 22, 2010)

“The Speech of Miss Polly Baker” (Engendered America # 36) (Oct. 22, 2010)
Students will underline/circle in the Smart Board the important key words/ vocabulary words.

  1. Students will be able to read aloud from the Smart Board.

  2. Students will be able to write on the Smart Board in order to complete the “Roles in Society” compare & contrast chart/Venn Diagram.

  1. Lesson Closure:

Description of methods to draw ideas together, review concepts, etc.

  1. After completing the “Roles in Society” compare & contrast chart, teacher will ask the students:

  • What were the men’s rights, roles and expectations in early America?

  • What were the women’s rights, roles, and expectations?

  • Are men and women equal in today’s society?

  1. After summarizing Franklin’s writings, teacher will ask students:

    • How did Franklin express many of his feminist ideas?

    • How did “Silence Dogood” & “The Speech of Miss Polly Baker” express feminist ideas?

  2. Home Learning:

Students will relate “equality or inequality” in the American society or in societies around the world with a current event (three paragraphs).


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page