Social Studies Grade 5 Collaborative Team Unit Plan



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Social Studies Grade 5 Collaborative Team Unit Plan

Unit One- Aboriginal Heritage of Canada


Outcome IN 5.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the Aboriginal heritage of Canada.


Unit opener: pre-assessment: What do we already know about First Nations heritage?

a.Locate on a map traditional first Nations and Inuit habitation areas in the era prior to European arrival, including the Northwest pacific Coast, Interior Plateau, Plains, Eastern Woodland, Sub Arctic, and Arctic

IN 5.1 a Interactive Map

Blank map of Canada







b.Research similarities and differences in ways of life among First Nations and Inuit communities prior to European contact (e.g., men’s roles, women’s roles, children’s roles).

“Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples Gr. 4-6” handouts

Pg.19-21, 27-29, 35-37, 42-44, 49-51

Student activity handout; organizer

Comparison activity: Similarities organizer

Differences organizer

www.firstpeoplesofcanada.com




Pre-assessment: organizer


c.Investigate the significant events and principle First Nations and Inuit leaders prior to and during the period of initial contact with Europeans .

See PA5.3 Living Sky lessons




f.Paraphrase a traditional narrative about the origins of the First Nations or Inuit peoples, about the relationship with the natural environment, and connections between spirituality and the natural environment.


IN 5.1 f Stories notebook file

Collection of online stories from Libraries and Archives Canada is found at:

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/stories/020020-5000-e.html

Contact your librarian for FN stories from your library such as Keepers of the Earth


















Unit Two- Europeans make contact with First Nations Peoples


Outcome: DR 5.3 Identify the European influence on pre-confederation Canadian Society.





a.Plot the principal voyages and experiences of the first European explorers who came to what is now Canada, and discuss the impact of voyages on the societies encountered (e.g., Cabot, Cartier, Champlain, Hudson, Kelsey, Fraser, Hearn, Mathieu Da Costa).

SmBd Notebook file: Principal Voyages and Experiences

Map of Voyages in Canada






b. Identify the social and cultural characteristics of New France (e.g., the influence of missionaries and of the Catholic Church; music; dance).


“Ordinary People in Canada’s Past” pg. 32 - 57




c. Recount the major events during the transition from French rule to British rule in what is now Canada.


“Ordinary People in Canada’s Past” pg. 58-85 teach with indicator “h” below.

“Recount major events” short lesson version







d. Describe the life of Acadians in early Canada, and describe the reasons for and results of the Acadian deportation.

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/settlement/kids/021013-2000.9-e.html

Canada: A People’s History “Expulsion of Acadians”







e. Show how trade influenced the establishment of the first communities in Canada.




Fur Trade handout from “Ordinary People in Canada’s Past” pg 86-93

Canada: A People’s History “The Fur Trade in Canada”







f.Explore the relationship between the British, First Nations, and the French in what is now Canada between 1760 and 1867, including the influence of culture, governance, and the imperial relationship with Britain.


This relationship should be explored while teaching all the indicators in this unit.




g. Determine how the British Empire affected the lives of British settlers, French-Canadians, First Nations, Inuit, and Métis in pre-confederation Canadian society.


The British Empire influence should be determined while teaching all the other indicators in this unit.




h. Describe the influence of the United Empire Loyalists on Canadian society, and reasons for the Loyalist migration to Canada.


The Loyalists handout from “Ordinary People in Canada’s Past” pg 60-85





i.Undertake an inquiry to determine how the fur trade affected the peoples of Canada.


Fur Trade handout from “Ordinary People in Canada’s Past” pg 86-93

Canada: A People’s History “The Fur Trade in Canada”







Outcome

IN 5.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the Aboriginal heritage of Canada. (indicators added here as well)







d.Assess the coming together of First Nations peoples with the French and British explorers and settlers, including the effect of the fur trade on the First Nations and the Métis in early Canada.


Fur Trade handout from “Ordinary People in Canada’s Past” pg 86-93

Canada: A People’s History “The Fur Trade in Canada”







e. Trace the evolution of the Métis in Canada, including their origins, language, and major historical events (e.g., the Métis of Red River, the North West Resistance).


Metis handout from “Ordinary People in Canada’s Past” pg 94-101

http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/fp_metis/fp_metis_menu.html







Outcome: PA 5.3 Develop an understanding of the nature of the treaty relationship between First Nations and Canada’s federal government.


PA 5.3 Treaty Six lessons from Living Sky

http://treaty6education.lskysd.ca/

Use Treaty Kit materials





a.Explain what a treaty is, and the purpose of a treaty.


PA 5.3 Treaty Six lessons from Living Sky

http://treaty6education.lskysd.ca/







b.Affirm that all Saskatchewan residents are treaty people.


PA 5.3 Treaty Six lessons from Living Sky

http://treaty6education.lskysd.ca/







c.Investigate the spirit and intent of the treaties from the perspective of the Crown and the First Nations in Western Canada.


PA 5.3 Treaty Six lessons from Living Sky

http://treaty6education.lskysd.ca/







d.Undertake an inquiry to examine the extent to which treaty promises have been met by parties to the treaties, and why the fulfillment of treaty obligations is important for all Canadians.


PA 5.3 Treaty Six lessons from Living Sky

http://treaty6education.lskysd.ca/







Outcome DR 5.2

Assess the impact of the environment on the lives of people living in Canada







b.Explain how different traditional worldviews of Earth affect the use of resources in Canada (e.g., Aboriginal and European attitudes toward ownership, Treaties, Crown land, homesteads, and the seigniorial system).


Contact your school’s treaty catalyst teacher

FN Traditional Worldview chart

Smartboard notebook file: FN Traditional Worldview chart





c.Investigate the relationship of various First Nations peoples with the environment, including economic relationships, migration, and settlement patterns prior to Confederation.


Teaching Treaties Kit: “The Learning Circle” Unit 6 First Nations and the Environment

Teaching Treaties Kit: Resource guide for Gr. 1

Topic Two: Mother Earth







Unit Three- Canada


Outcome DR 5.1

Analyze the historic and contemporary relationship of people to land in Canada.





a.Distinguish between physical and political maps and investigate the application of mapping and data management (i.e., geographic information systems) technology.


Any atlas class set




b. Differentiate between Canada’s various geopolitical constructs, including a country, a province, and a municipality.


Any atlas class set




c.Outline the predominant physical features of the regions of Canada, including the Western Cordilleran, Interior Plains, Canadian Shield, Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Lowlands, Appalachian, and Arctic/Innuitian regions (e.g., vegetation zones, resources, bodies of water, and principal landforms).


Check your school for “Canada’s Geographical Regions” Canadian Curriculum Teacher Helper series

Regions of Canada lesson plan

Assessment

Great site for Regions photos with information at higher reading level for viewing activity, gallery walk, jigsaw: http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/natural-regions







Outcome DR 5.2 Assess the impact of the environment on the lives of people living in Canada.







a.Describe the climate of different regions of Canada, and investigate how population distribution in Canada is related to climate, resources, and topographical features.

Use your school’s class set of atlases

Climate maps link: http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/environment/climate

2006 Population map link: http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/peopleandsociety/population





IN 5.2 Analyze the evolution of Canada as a multicultural nation.








a. Describe Canada’s historical and current demographics, including population numbers, age, and location.


Population map link: http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/peopleandsociety/population





b. Identify trends and challenges in Canada’s demographics.


Use this chart to begin discussion on trends and challenges in an aging demographic.




Outcome DR 5.1

Analyze the historic and contemporary relationship of people to land in Canada.







d. Undertake an inquiry investigating the relationship between Canada’s physical geographic features and the population distribution.


See DR 5.2 a – very similar




e. Explain the meaning and origin of a variety of Canadian symbols and consider the purposes of such symbols (e.g., coat of arms, motto, flag, beaver, feather, drum, RCMP, national anthem).


Symbols of Canada booklet




f. Investigate reasons for western expansion of Canada in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and the consequences of the expansion.


May consider moving this to Unit 4 below with immigration and multicultural indicators.




PA 5.1

Describe Canada’s political evolution.

See unit plan “Political Evolution”

Power Point for “Political Evolution”






a. Investigate the territorial evolution of Canada from 1608-1867, and from 1867 to the current era.


See unit plan “Political Evolution”

Power Point for “Political Evolution”






b. Differentiate between the status of a province and a territory in the Canadian confederation.


See unit plan “Political Evolution”

Power Point for “Political Evolution”






c. Identify on a map each province and territory, indicate the year each joined Confederation, and investigate the circumstances and reasons for joining in the united Canada.


See unit plan “Political Evolution”

Power Point for “Political Evolution”






d.Explain the purpose of a constitution, and describe the importance of the British North America Act of 1867 and the Constitution Act and Charter of Rights and Freedoms of 1982.


See unit plan “Political Evolution”

Power Point for “Political Evolution”






Outcome PA 5.2

Explain the purposes and functions of governance structures in Canada, including First Nations systems and those patterned on the Westminster parliamentary system.

See unit plan “Governance Structures of Canada”

Resource: “Canadian Government” Canadian curriculum teacher helper series gr. 4-6 (black cover with red on side)






a. Represent, in graphic format, the structure of various levels of government in Canada, including municipal, First Nations, provincial, territorial, and federal governments.


See unit plan “Governance Structures of Canada”




b. Investigate the structure of First Nations governments in Canada, using accurate terminology (e.g., elected chief, hereditary chief, band, band council, treaty, self-government, Assembly of First Nations).

See lesson First Nations Government

See unit plan “Governance Structures of Canada”






c.Develop an understanding of the functions of the following governance bodies and the role of those in leadership positions: House of Commons, Senate, Governor General, Prime Minister, member of the federal parliament, government minister.

See unit plan “Governance Structures of Canada”















Unit Four- Canada as a Multicultural Nation


Outcome IN 5.2 Analyze the evolution of Canada as a multicultural nation.


Immigration Unit IN5.2 e f g h i

Strangers Becoming Us Contact learning coach for copy of the CD

Online Immigration lesson collection can be found at:

http://www.sd71.bc.ca/Sd71/Edulinks/immigrat/index.htm

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/





c. Differentiate between refugees and immigrants.


Refugee / immigrant sort lesson

http://learningtogive.org/lessons/unit189/lesson4.html







PA 5.1 Describe Canada’s political evolution.

e. Explain the push-pull factors that motivated various cultural groups immigrating to Canada during the 18th and 19th centuries (e.g., building of the railway, fleeing famine or religious oppression, gold rushes).




Multicultural Nation lesson collection

activity #2 courtesy NESD






Outcome 5.2 Analyze the evolution of Canada as a multicultural nation.

d. Explain what motivates newcomers to move to Canada (e.g., entrepreneurship, employment, family reunification, refuge, education, reputation as a good place to live).

Sask Hall of Fame Ted Jaleta lesson




e.Undertake an inquiry which compares the immigration policies and practices of the 19th century to those of the current era, and assess the results of those policies and practices.

Immigration time line activity




f. Identify the goals of various ethnic and cultural advocacy organizations in Canada, including First Nations, Inuit, and Métis organizations, as well as organizations supporting new immigrants to Canada.

Advocacy groups activity




g.Identify the historic origins of a variety of place names in Canada, and investigate the reason for the naming.

Place name activity

Aboriginal place names information



http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography-boundary/geographical-name/geoname-origins/5913





h. Graphically display the country of origin of immigrants to Canada in the 19th and 21st centuries, and account for similarities and differences in the two eras.

Immigration graphing lesson




i. Examine the Canadian government treatment of various groups of immigrants to Canada (e.g., Chinese immigrants in the 1800s, Japanese Canadians in the 1930s and 1940s, Eastern European immigrants in the late 19th and early 20th century).

Treatment of immigrants lesson






Unit Five- Environment of Canada and Its Future


Outcome

RW 5.1 Explain the importance of sustainable management of the environment to Canada’s future.




a.Differentiate between renewable resources (e.g., forests, fish, water) and non-renewable resources (e.g., oil, minerals).







b. Create an inventory of current non-sustainable practices (e.g., presence of plastics, packaging, dumping of waste into river systems).







c. List the possible consequences of non-sustainable practices related to the use of resources (e.g., lack of resources for future generations, endangered species, climate change).







d. Taking one resource as an example, illustrate how resource use and the extraction process of the resource affects the environment (e.g., forests, tar sands, coal, uranium, potash).







e. Give examples of policies and actions that contribute to sustainability (e.g., water conservation, informed decisions by consumers, reusing materials).
















Outcome

RW 5.2 Hypothesize about economic changes that Canada may experience in the future.




a.Using factual data and statistics, predict the future demographic make-up of Canada (e.g., growth in senior citizen population, Aboriginal population, rates of immigration, birth rates, rural depopulation).







b.Describe the effect the movement of people has on local and provincial communities.







c.Predict which industries will be of future significance in Canada using factual information, statistics, and other data to support your prediction.







d.Give examples of possible changes in Canada’s principal industries (e.g., large agricultural companies replacing family farms; the importance of technological industries).







e.Speculate upon how contrasting worldviews toward the natural environment may affect the use of resources.


























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