Share the Journey 7 th grade



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Inquiry Intervention: Adaptation for “Share the Journey - 7th grade” lesson plan posted on www.gadoe.org

Guided or Open Inquiry Lesson Plan adapted from SUMMIT template

Description: In a Guided Inquiry (level 3) lesson, the teacher provides a question for investigation as well as the necessary materials. Students develop the procedure to investigate a teacher-selected question. In an Open Inquiry lesson (level 4), the teacher acts as the facilitator, while students formulate a question they want to answer and the methods for the investigation. The Guided and Open Inquiry lesson plan template includes text fields for guiding questions, learning objectives, prior knowledge, introduction, investigate, analyze, and closure.

Grade Level

7

Georgia Performance Standard

SS7H1c

NCSS strands

1, 3, 6, 10

Depth of Knowledge (DOK)

Moderate

Learning Objective:

What will the students know and be able to do as a result of this lesson?

What is the concept you want the students to learn?


Students will…

be able to describe the roles of Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk in the anti-apartheid movement in

South Africa.

be able to relate the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa to the civil rights movement in the U.S.


Enduring Understanding:
Students will develop an understanding that government leaders and citizens share the responsibility

of protecting and upholding civil rights for all.




Guiding Questions:

(Essential Questions)

What are the guiding questions for this lesson?

Provide specific amount of

directives to the student.


How were the civil rights movements in South Africa and the United States similar? (or different?)
What role did Nelson Mandela play in the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa?
How did Nelson Mandela’s views and perspectives differ from the position that F.W. deKlerk had as President of South Africa?
How did Nelson Mandela and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s speeches convince leaders to make changes to civil rights legislation in their respective countries?
What similarities and differences can be discovered between the civil rights movements in the United States and South Africa?
What roles did government leaders and citizen activists have in the civil rights movements in the U.S. and South Africa?
How are Jim Crow laws and apartheid similar?
What brought about the end of segregation and apartheid?


Prior Knowledge:

What prior knowledge

should students have for this lesson?

SS5H8,b,c; SS5H2,c



Introduction:

How will the teacher introduce the lesson to the students?



Display photos on the wall or at stations around the room. Include captions with basic descriptions of photos (don't reveal too much information!) Keep captions covered until after observations and questions are generated.
Allow a few minutes for students to study all of the photos.
Ask students to list observations of the photos and any prior knowledge associated with the photos.

Briefly have students describe what an observation is. Provide one or two examples of observations while students work to help facilitate student thought processes.
Have students share observations with a partner or small group.
Ask students to generate questions or "I wonder..." statements inspired by the photos.

Share examples while students work to help facilitate student thought processes.
Students can discuss questions with one another to facilitate brainstorming.
Reveal captions of photos. Allow students a few moments to study the captions and photos.
Display the key terms: Civil Rights, Apartheid, United States, South Africa, Nelson Mandela, F.W. deKlerk, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., segregation, equality, Afrikaneers, Jim Crow
Ask students to think-pair-share about the key words. Ask students to share explanations of the terms. Ask if there are any clarifying questions.
Ask students to discuss in small groups/pairs how the key words relate to the photos.
Introduce the overarching guiding questions of the lesson:

"How were the civil rights movements in the United States and South Africa similar? (or different?)"


Ask students to think-pair-share about how the theme relates to the photos and the key words. Ask students to share ideas. Have students record the theme in their learning log.
Explain the task to students: they will develop a research question, then, complete an investigation of their question, create a presentation of their finding and present to the class.
Ask students to refine their initial questions to formulate a research question that relates to the theme.

Share examples of strong research questions and explanations of criteria for good questions.

Investigate:

What question(s) will students be investigating?

What process will students

follow to collect information that can be used to answer the question(s)?




Teacher now explains/displays an outline of the procedure and outcomes for the inquiry project. After the explanation, students begin research and project planning.
Inquiry Steps: investigation phase

  1. Students will refine and decide upon a question for exploration.

  2. Students will utilize the teacher-built WebQuest, text set, encyclopedia, library, and other resources to research their questions.

  3. Students will take notes and collect materials for presentations from research materials.




Analyze:

How will students organize and interpret the data collected during the investigation?

What activity can the students explore to make the realization?


Inquiry Steps: presentation phase

  1. Students will draft a concept proposal (description of project presentation format and content) for teacher approval.

  2. Students will create a rough draft of presentation content.

  3. Students will peer review rough drafts.

  4. Students will revise and create final draft.

  5. Students will create and deliver a presentation of their research to the class.




Closure:

What will the teacher do to bring the lesson to a close?

How will the students make sense of the investigation?

What's the learning moment?


Students will create a learning log entry that summarizes all of the student presentations.

Students will answer the following questions in their learning logs:

What was Nelson Mandela’s impact in the anti-apartheid movement?

What was F.W. de Klerk’s impact in the anit-apartheid movement?

How does the anti-apartheid movement compare to the civil rights movement in the U.S.?





Accommodations:

Describe how to accommodate students with special needs and how to differentiate instruction.



Students are free to choose or create a presentation format, with teacher approval. Examples of options include:
graphic organizers/concept maps
Prezi or PowerPoint presentation
theatrical debate/discussion between two of the major players studied (with a partner)
virtual tour of pertinent places/events/persons
Informative booklet

Research resources will include audio, video, and a variety of text resources.

Students are able to work in pairs, small groups, or individually. (Equal student participation in the presentation is required.)

A guided inquiry template can be provided for students who require assistance.



Extensions:

Describe possible extension of this lesson.

Extend and evaluate:


If students complete the project early, they can relate their research to present global issues and/or their personal history. Ask students to portray their connections in images/art or writing. Students could create a post for the class blog based on the connections they create.


Suggested Technology: What are the suggested technology requirements to use this resource?

☐ Computer for Presenter X LCD Projector X Adobe Flash Player

X Computers for Students ☐ Document Camera X Adobe Acrobat Reader

X Internet Connection ☐ Overhead Projector ☐ Microsoft Office Document

☐ Interactive Whiteboard X Speakers / Headphones ☐ Microsoft Silverlight

☐ Microphones ☐ Java Plugin

☐ Assistive Technology ☐ Computer Media Player



Special Materials Needed:

Describe what materials or preparations are needed for this resource.




  • Share the Journey 7th grade lesson plan from www.gadoe.org

  • Pictures and additional resources from Share the Journey lesson plan

  • Additional pictures of Nelson Mandela, F.W. de Klerk, MLK Jr, JFK, and images of apartheid in South Africa

  • WebQuest containing links/content to guide internet research and Mandela and King’s speeches

  • Text set or additional in-class research resources

  • Display of theme and key words (either PowerPoint or SmartBoard presentation or written/displayed on whiteboard or word wall)

  • whiteboard and markers to display samples during brainstorming phase

  • Presentation rubric

Further Recommendations:

Provide recommendations

concerning the preparation or implementation of your resource.


Links for building a WebQuest or research resource list:

http://www.history.com/topics/apartheid

http://www.apartheidmuseum.org/ (resources tab for PDF books)

http://www.loc.gov/search/?in=partof:Teachers&q=civil%20rights (Library of Congress)

http://www.loc.gov/search/?q=apartheid+ (Library of Congress)

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1993/klerk-bio.html

http://2001-2009.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/pcw/98678.htm (U.S. Dept of State)

http://www.jfklibrary.org/Education/Students/Leaders-in-the-Struggle-for-Civil-Rights/MLK-Jr.aspx






Lesson Title:

Share the Journey: An investigation into civil rights in South Africa and the U.S.

Short Summary:

What is the concept you want the students to learn?

Concluding Summary


Students will…

complete an open inquiry project to research aspects of the civil rights movements in South Africa and

the U.S.

be able to describe the roles of Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk in the anti-apartheid movement in

South Africa.

be able to relate the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa to the civil rights movement in the U.S.


Enduring Understanding:
Students will develop an understanding that government leaders and citizens share the responsibility

of protecting and upholding civil rights for all.




Grade Level: ☐ 6th Grade X 7th Grade ☐ 8th Grade

Intended Audience: X Students ☐ Educators ☐ Parents

Estimated Time Frame: 90 - 180 minutes

Reading in Content Area: ☐ Select if resource supports reading in content area




Keywords:

civil rights, apartheid, segregation, president, Jim Crow Laws, Afrikaneers

Instructional Component Type(s): Check one or all that apply.

Curriculum Resources: ☐ Full Course X Lesson Plan ☐ Teaching Idea ☐ Unit/Lesson Sequence

X WebQuest ☐ Problem Solving Task ☐ Worksheet

☐ Project ☐ Virtual Manipulative ☐ Formative Assessment

☐ Educational Game ☐ Assessment

General Resources: ☐ Professional Development ☐ Data Set ☐ Image/Photograph

☐ Educational Software/Tool ☐ Presentation/Slideshow ☐ Text Resource

☐ Tutorial ☐ Video/Audio/Animation ☐ Resource Collection

☐ Instructional Technique

Primary Instructional Component Type: Lesson Plan



Nature of Instruction: Check one or all that apply.

☐ Direct Instruction ☐ Confirmation Inquiry (Level 1) ☐ Learning Cycle (e.g., 5E)

☐ Demonstration ☐ Structured Inquiry (Level 2) ☐ Writing to Learn

☐ Predict-Explain-Observe-Explain ☐Guided Inquiry (Level 3) ☐ Argumentation

☐ Cooperative Learning X Open Inquiry (Level 4)


Public Remarks:

Remarks to share with other educators on using this resource.



See “Share the Journey - 7th grade” lesson plan found on http://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Curriculum-and-Instruction/Pages/Social-Studies.aspx

for additional background information and lesson resources.



Source & Access Info
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Submit Anonymously: ☐ Select this option if you wish to submit this resource anonymously.
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Notes For Reviewers:

This lesson plan is based on Georgia Performance Standards, specifically 7th grade Social Studied GPS SS7H1c. Visit georgiastandards.org for more detail on Georgia performance standards. Visit gadoe.org to view the lesson plan provided in the curriculum and instruction resources.

Created by Maggie Van Cantfort for EDUC 634, Social Studies Methods

SUMMIT lesson plan template retrieved November 24, 2013 from https://summit.cecs.ucf.edu/v2/w2file.php?id=230











Students Marching in Soweto on 16 June 1976

http://www.apartheidmuseum.org/sites/default/files/files/downloads/Learners%20book%20Chapter4.pdf







http://af.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%AAer:Black_Sash_2.jpg - Beelde in die publieke domein in Suid-Afrika



March for Mandela closing rally, 14 March 1987 (Source: City Group

http://nonstopagainstapartheid.wordpress.com/2012/03/16/marching-for-mandela/



http://photos.state.gov/galleries/usinfo-photo/39/civil_rights_07/9.html



http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/07/nelson-mandela-1.html





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