Sections: Section 0407 Alfonso Perez-Mendez Room



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Course Number: ARC 4323

Course Title: Architectural Design Seven

Term Fall 2015

Sections: Section 0407 Alfonso Perez-Mendez Room 214 (16 students)

All sections have available room FAB 193 Monday @ period 9

Credits 6

Meeting times: Monday / Wednesday / Friday 1:55 PM to 4:55 PM

email: alfperez@ufl.edu

Faculty Office and time: In 2nd floor Architecture Building. Office hours one hour before class, email for an appointment.




Syllabus




COURSE description and role within the sequence


Design Seven is the second in the sequence of urban studios of the upper division curriculum that address the city as context in different ways and at different scales. Design Seven investigates the contemporary urban condition evolving in the dense grid cities developed by the industrial revolution such as New York City. The course is specifically coupled with Design Six: in Design Six the students were asked to focus on the small pre-industrial city of Charleston, whose urban condition was created by historically bound rules and technologies that fix spatial relations at a small scale. In Design Seven, we re-examine these urban forms and procedures within the metropolis. The issues introduced in this course will be revisited either in some of the optional Design Eight studios or in later graduate studios dedicated to the post-industrial urban landscape that predominates in Florida Cities.
Building upon the skills of the first urban design six studio --one that was more focused in the single building-- Design Seven tackles a association of buildings. By doing so, it deals also with the issue of contemporary urban public space. Design 7 develops connections with the parallel Theory 2 and Environmental Technology 2 courses.
Design Seven will focus on questions concerning contemporary urban conditions, urban assemblages and the role of architecture within the city using Manhattan as its context.
Analysis

Design Seven will continue the trajectory of city analysis started briefly in lower division and developed in Design 6. The role of analysis in the course is twofold. First students must document the existing housing conditions in a dense grid city. Although, frequently New York is chosen for the semester, this introductory documentation may be achieved through the study of sections, maps, texts, and aerial and ground photography of dense urban conditions not limited to New York.


In this phase of documentation, the analysis includes sectional exercises of dense hybrid buildings that must always include a housing component.
Design

This analysis develops into an introductory project exercise, frequently carried in groups, that brings the students in to a more speculative territory that forms the foundation for the later architectural proposal developed in the second exercise.


The bulk of the design work of the semester is carried through a second and final exercise that lasts for the last 10 of the 16 weeks of the semester. In this part of the semester, a design situation is presented to the students. The design situations favored by the studio include a substantial set of pre-existing city conditions and developments that in the opinion of the faculty create the possibility of dense urban space in an underdeveloped area of the city. A substantial program is established, where multiplicity of uses is proposed as a subject for discussion. For the midterm jury the students present a schematic urban proposal that includes at least a figure ground strategy, programmatic proposals, and a strategy for the use of the public space.

In the final weeks of the semester the student focus in the schematic development of both the public space and the buildings in their proposals, including basic accessibility, careful design of the areas at the ground level, design of the surrounding public space and building skin understanding its spatial contribution to the public realm.


Architectural Expectations

Although the territory of analysis can be broader in scope, in zeroing in the areas proposed for the development of the project, they should be such that each individual student can produce investigations in model and in drawings at a scale of 1/32” = 1’ – 0”.


1/32” = 1’ – 0” is the minimum scale that allows for a discussion of the architectural components of the buildings. General plans should remain at this scale but sections of individual buildings can be more detailed at a scale of 1/16” = 1’ – 0”.
In order to keep the focus of the class in issues of public space and associations of buildings it should “not” include more detailed explorations.
Sources and Influences

The materials brought to this course by both the faculty and the students can have a significant impact on the direction the course will take. If the sample city chosen for this course is, as it has been in later years New York City, there is an abundant set of possible sources for readings web sites, cinema and art. The coordinator believes that these sources do not need to be the same for each studio and should include the take of the individual faculty and individual set of students.


For the purpose of documentation, however, I have put on reserve on our library a set of books on New York City which could be useful for documenting the phase of analysis. Please find enclosed at the end of this document the list of books put on reserve.

Calendar


Wk 01-02 NYC Project 1a: An technical- analytical Investigation of the issues that define Large and Extra Large Projects

To inaugurate the semester, The students are asked to examine building precedents by drawing two significant sections through a complex multistory hybrid building (projects where housing is mixed with any other program ). The building should be chosen for quality and inventiveness of the section. As you develop these sectional studies, you should bracket (to group; to categorize; to limit) program and space in order to identify and articulate the primary spatial situations (events; experiences) of the project. You should be searching for the relationship(s) between these primary situations and the: These analysis are carried in groups


façade

public space

roof/sky

entry/ground

accessibility

circulation

each other
Wk 02-06 NYC Project 1b: Insertion of the large project in the Urban assemblage

In the second part of the semester and including a one week long trip to New York City at the end of the segment, the students analyze through documents and through Google possible sites in New York site. The students also analyze the public spaces close to the sites that they have chosen. In a quick exercise they proceed into a diagrammatic insertion of a large project into one selected site.


Wk 07-10 NYC Project 2a: Urban Assemblages

In the third part of the semester, a design situation is presented to the students. The design situations favored by the studio include a substantial set of pre-existing city conditions and developments that in the opinion of the faculty create the possibility of dense urban space in an underdeveloped area of the city. A substantial program is established, where multiplicity of uses is established as a subject for discussion


Mid-term Jury. For the midterm jury the students present a schematic urban proposal that includes at least a figure ground strategy, programmatic proposals, and a strategy for the use of the public space.


Wk 11-14 NYC Project 2b: Project Development / Final Presentation

In the final weeks of the semester the student focus in the schematic development of both the public space and the buildings in their proposals, including basic accessibility, careful design of the areas at the ground level, design of the surrounding public space and building skin understanding its spatial contribution to the public realm.


Wk 15: Monday Final Jury, all day

Wk 16: Individual student work to respond to the reflect comments of the critics in their projects

Wk 17: Monday final project delivery in electronic form
Concepts considered in the work

Part I: Analysis, Studio Project 1, Trip Preparation, and Trip to New York City

Week 1-6



  • Precedents: the Urban project

The students are asked to examine 2 major building precedents located in major dense cities. These projects should be chosen in part for their quality and inventiveness of the section and are to be analyzed through documents. The studies produced should focus on circulation, building envelope systems, and linkages to related urban public space. In order to help them focus on relationships between the building and the public realm, students should be required to analyze any public spaces linked to the buildings that they are investigating. Since, after all, 90% of all cities is made of housing, this factor should be included in the analysis.




  • Morphology: an Urban analysis

Students should engage in an investigation of the existing rules, forms and procedures of the metropolis (NYC) prior to visiting the city. These explorations will be conducted in the context of the students selecting individual sites to locate their Project 1 within the fabric of Manhattan. Multi-media explorations are encouraged to provide the students with a variety of resources and perspectives from which to document their analytical work.




  • Project 1: an Urban Intervention

As a means to engage the city and the studies described above more fully, the students will be required to design the diagram of a medium scale urban infill building before their trip NYC. A hybrid program including housing is suggested but various other programs may be considered for the project. However, the program should be relatively neutral and should not be fore grounded as the only or fundamental principle generating factor in this investigation. Using their various precedents from the city as well as other helpful case study projects, the project should focus primarily on the major public spaces (lobby, circulation, etc.) and how the circulation, building envelope system and various urban linkages create the underlying quality and experience of their project. In order to help reinforce and understanding of the rules, forms and procedures of the city, each student will select a site, given the group as a whole multiple sites for consideration. Although each student would only have a single site to work within, dialogue among students would highlight variations and permutations in the metropolis.


Since group work is encouraged during this semester, the analytical work described above is suggested to be done in groups of two students, which provides interesting opportunities for collaboration.
Part II: Studio Project 2

Week 7-16




  • The primary project should be sited in such a manner as to require territorial studies focused on the design of specific urban architectural public space that is precisely programmed and is intrinsically connected with the building proposals.



  • Building development should emphasize accessibility and connections both to the city and throughout the building section, building envelope systems as they relate to the surrounding urban context and climate, and the design of precisely defined multi-functional environments.




  • Mid-term, the students should have a schematic urban proposal that includes at least a figure ground strategy, programmatic proposals, and a strategy for the use of the defined public space.




  • Final projects should include at minimum building/site sections at 1/16 =1’-0” and a finely developed urban proposal at 1/32”=1’-0” (model, drawing or both). This final proposal should be a complex assemblage of urban public space and multiple buildings in dialogue with each other and the public space.

Collaboration in groups of two is also recommended during this portion of the semester. Given the curricular objectives for the studio as stated previously, it is recommended that each group of two students be responsible for designing more than a single building and that each group also be required to engage- through design- questions and concerns associated with any architectural exploration involving a large territory of urban public space.



Methods by which students will be evaluated and their grade determined. Policy related to class attendance. Policy related to exams or other work
The Studio System

This structure is substantially different than a lecture format, more closely approximating a lab class. The basic assumption of the studio format is that the student learns as much from fellow students as from professors. Your design studio will always be a group of between 10 and 25 students. Studio time will involve your active participation in discussion and exercises. The process is an active and communal one, involving redundant sequences of doing, looking, articulating, clarifying and doing again. All effort and critique are public - therefore it is essential that you learn to trust and respect one another. Success in the early years of Design seems directly correlated to whether or not the student is working in school or at least in groups with his or her peers.


Critique

From time to time at the end of a project, or at a critical moment of the work Critiques are scheduled. These are public presentations of the work and provide a forum for discussion its Usually an external critic - or several - are brought in to provide a fresh viewpoint and to stimulate discussion. These sessions are usually more formal than class sessions., and should be taken quite seriously. Critics come in on their own time and expend a serious level of energy on trying to understand your endeavors and give you good feedback. You should think of your presentation not as a moment of judgment, but as an opportunity to get input on implications and possible directions for development. The critiques of your fellow students will also be essential to your education as a designer.


Room Use

Since many students are working in the same room it is essential that you work quietly and unobtrusively, that you respect your fellow student's work, and that you clean up after you are finished. Please note that Spray Painting anywhere on the campus grounds are prohibited.


Safety

Please use every precaution in the workshop and in the studio. Do not bring power tools into the studio. Please note that Power Tools are prohibited in the Studio.


Policy on Retaining Work

Please note that the University of Florida, College of Design, Construction, and Planning policy states that student’s work may be retained indefinitely for academic purposes. You should be prepared for the instructor to ask that it be exhibited or photographed during or after the term. Having your work retained for photography or exhibition is evidence of its quality and value to the School. Not to worry, you will be able either to retrieve your original work or retrieve it temporarily to make copies or photograph it for your own personal purposes.


Attendance

There is no possibility to make up a missed studio session. Notes will be useless, and although a long conversation with a fellow student will help you begin to figure out what to do to prepare for the next session, it can never make up the learning. A session with your professor may or may not be possible and cannot duplicate the collective conversation. As a result our policy on attendance is extremely strict:


ANY absence must be explained; i.e. call into the office and have a note left for your professor or an email. It is your responsibility to get the assignments from your fellow students. Un-excused absences will adversely affect your grade and excessive absences can result in a failing grade. The number of absences adversely affecting your grade is at the discretion of the professor. Chronic lateness can also affect your grade.
It is never permissible to miss a Critique. Nor is it permissible to be late or to leave early. It will be considered a direct insult to your fellow classmates and the invited critics.
If something is seriously wrong please talk to us about it. Arrangements can be made to cope with serious illness, family or personal crises.
Performance

There are no tests in Design. There are also no right or wrong answers per se. You will not be taking in information over the course of the term and regurgitating it in another form. You will begin as you will go on - by making things over and over and over. Each time you will take on new questions or the same questions at another level of sophistication. Therefore, there is no single answer for which we are looking . We will give you feedback on the directions you have taken, suggestions for further work, and assess the architectural implications of your projects.


Our goal's for you are:

(1.) to have at your fingertips a thousand fruitful ways to approach any problem and

(2.) to learn to critique yourselves effectively. What we ask from you is a concerted effort, an innovative take on the problem, constructions that raise architectural issues, and, most importantly, for you to challenge yourself and be constantly willing to continue to develop a scheme. Grades will be assigned as much on dedication and improvement as on talent - if you enter the course gifted and sit on your skill all term, you will not get an A.
You will be graded not only on the work itself but also in your ability to perform on the goals stated above. All grading will follow UF policies that you can find at: http://vl\VW.registrar. ufl.edu/catalog/policies/regulationgrades.html
To clarify the system of grading for studio classes:

A Outstanding work only

A- Close to outstanding

B+ Very Good Work

B Good Work

B- Good work with some problems

C+ Slightly Above Average Work

C Average Work

C- Average Work with some problems

D+ Poor Work with some effort

D Poor Work

E Inadequate Work


Regarding accommodations for students with disabilities

"Students requesting classroom accommodation must first register with the Dean of Students Office. The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation to the student who must then provide this documentation to the Instructor when requesting accommodation. "


Required and recommended textbooks

This class has no required texts, some recommended books are:

Key Urban Housing of the Twentieth Century: Plans, Sections and Elevations, Hilary French, 2008

New Urban Housing, Hilary French, 2006

Modern Housing Prototypes, Roger Sherwood, 1981

Density Book, Data Diagrams Dwellings, A+T Density Series, 2008

Density, New Collective Housing, A+T Density Series, 2008

Density Projects, A+T Density Series, 2008

Pamphlet Architecture # 5, The Alphabetical City, 1980

Pamphlet architecture # 11, Hybrid Buildings, 1986

Pamphlet architecture # 13, Edge of a City, 1991

Layered Urbanisms, Yale school of Architecture, 2007

Urbanisms, Working with Doubt, Steven Holl, 2009
Additionally there are in the library the following books, in reserve for your professors’ and students’ use:
Alpern, Andrew.

New York's architectural holdouts

Mineola, N.Y. : Dover Publications, 1996.

Description:

HD268.N5 A46 1996


Alpern, Andrew.

Apartments for the affluent

New York's fabulous luxury apartments : with original floor plans from the

Dakota, River House, Olympic Tower, and other great buildings

New York : Dover Publications, 1987, c1975.

NA7860 .A497 1987
Alpern, Andrew.

Apartments for the affluent : a historical survey of buildings in New York


New York : McGraw-Hill,

NA7860 .A497 1975

NA7860 .A497 1975
Alpern, Andrew.

Historic Manhattan apartment houses


New York : Dover, c1996.

NA7862.N5 A45 1996


American Institute of Architects. New York Chapter.

AIA guide to New York City


New York, Macmillan, 1968.

NA735.N5 A78 1968


American Institute of Architects. New York Chapter. 2ndand 3rd copies

AIA guide to New York City


New York, Macmillan 1968

NA735.N5 A78 1968

917.472 A512a 1968
American Institute of Architects. New York Chapter.

AIA guide to New York City


Rev. ed.

New York : Macmillan, 1978.

NA735.N5 A78 1978
Arthus-Bertrand, Yann.

New York from the air


New York : Harry N. Abrams, 1998.

F128.37 .A68 1998


Balfour, Alan.

New York


Chichester : Wiley-Academy, 2001.

NA735.N5 B24 2001


Boyer, M. Christine.

Manhattan manners : architecture and style, 1850-1900


New York : Rizzoli, 1985.

NA735.N5 B69 1985


Breeze, Carla.

New York deco


New York : Rizzoli, 1993.

NA735.N5 B74 1993


Casper, Dale E.

The architecture of New York City : recent projects and reviews, 1981-1985


Monticello, Ill. : Vance Bibliographies, Ò1986)

NA 2500 .A741 no. A-1703


Diamonstein, Barbaralee.

The landmarks of New York


New York : Abrams, 1988.

F128.7 .D55 1988


Diamonstein, Barbaralee.

The landmarks of New York III


New York : Harry N. Abrams, 1998.

F128.7 .D57 1998


Dodds, Jerrilyn D.

New York masjid : the mosques of New York City


New York : PowerKids Press, 2002.

TEMPORARY CONTROL In Process.


Dolkart, Andrew.

Morningside Heights : a history of its architecture and development


New York : Columbia University Press, 1998.

NA735.N5 D65 1998


Dolkart, Andrew.

Guide to New York City landmarks / New York City Landmarks Preservation

Commission

Washington : Preservation Press, c1992.

F128.18 .D65 1992
Drechsler-Marx, Carin.

Broadway, from the Battery to the Bronx


New York : Abrams, 1988.

F128.67.B7 D74 1988


Dunlap, David W.

On Broadway : a journey uptown over time


New York : Rizzoli, 1990.

F128.67.B7 D86 1990


Gayle, Margot.

Cast-iron architecture in New York : a photographic survey


New York : Dover Publications, 1974.

721.04471 G287c


Gray, Christopher, 1950-

Blueprints : twenty-six extraordinary structures


New York : Simon and Schuster, c1981.

T379 .G73 1981


Gray, Christopher, 1950-

Changing New York


New York : Dover Publications, 1992.

NA735.N5 G73 1992


Halpern, John, 1918-

New York, New York : an architectural portfolio


New York : Dutton, c1978.

NA735.N5 H34 1978


Jacobs, Jane

The death and life of great American cities.

New York : Random House, 1961.

NA9108 .J3
Jacobs, Jane

The death and life of great American cities.

Random House <1961>

NA9108 .J3

711.40973 J17d


Kaldor, Andras, 1938-

New York : masterpieces of architecture


ND497.K35 A4 1999
Koolhaas, Rem.

Delirious New York : a retroactive manifesto for Manhattan


New York : Oxford University Press, 1978.

NA735.N5 K66


Koolhaas, Rem.

Delirious New York : a retroactive manifesto for Manhattan (2nd copy)

New York : Monacelli Press, c1994.

NA735.N5 K661 1994
Landau, Sarah Bradford, 1935-

Rise of the New York skyscraper, 1865-1913


New Haven : Yale University Press, 1996.

NA6232 .L36 1996


Lockwood, Charles.

Bricks & brownstone; the New York row house, 1783-1929, an architectural &

social history

New York, McGraw-Hill <1972>

NA7238.N6 L66
Morrison, William (William Alan)

Broadway theatres : history & architecture


Mineola, N.Y. : Dover Publications, c1999.

PN2277.N5 M58 1999


New York, N.Y. : Architectural League of New York

New schools for New York.

Princeton Architectural Press, 1992.

LB3221 .N436 1992

New York architecture, 1970-1990


New York, NY : Rizzoli International Publications, c1989.

NA735.N5 N48x 1989


Friedman, Joe.

Inside New York : discovering the classic interiors of New York

London : Phaidon Press Ltd., 1998, c1992.

NK2002 .F75 1998
Reynolds, Donald M.

The architecture of New York City : histories and views of important structures


New York : Macmillan ; London : Collier Macmillan, c1984.

NA735.N5 R49 1984


Reynolds, Donald M.

The architecture of New York City : histories and views of important structures,

sites, and symbols

Rev. ed.

New York : J. Wiley, c1994.

http://www.netLibrary.com/urlapi.asp?action=summary&v=1&bookid=26125

Licensed for UF students, faculty and staff

E-BOOK No call number available Circ. info not available


Silver, Nathan.

Lost New York.

Houghton Mifflin, 1967.

917.47103 S587l
Silver, Nathan.

Lost New York


New York : Schocken Books, 1971, c1967.

F128.37 .S55x 1971


Silver, Nathan.

Lost New York, expanded and updated


Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2000.

NA735.N5 S49 2000


Stern, Robert A. M.

New York 1880 : architecture and urbanism in the gilded age


New York, NY : Monacelli Press, c1999.

NA735.N5 S727 1999


Stern, Robert A. M.

New York 1900 : metropolitan architecture and urbanism, 1890-1915


New York : Rizzoli, 1983.

NA735.N5 S73 1983


Stern, Robert A. M.

New York 1930 : architecture and urbanism between the two world wars


New York : Rizzoli, 1987.

NA735.N5 S734 1987


Stern, Robert A. M.

New York 1960 : architecture and urbanism between the Second World War and the

Bicentennial


New York, NY : Monacelli Press, 1995.

NA735.N5 S735 1995


Tauranac, John, 1939-

Essential New York : a guide to the history and architecture of Manhattan's

important buildings, parks, and bridges

New York : Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, c1979.

F128.37 .T36
Tauranac, John, 1939-

Elegant New York : the builders and the buildings, 1885-1915


New York, NY : Abbeville Press, c1985.

NA735.N5 T38 1985


Trager, James.

Park Avenue : street of dreams


New York : Atheneum, 1990.

F128.67.P3 T73 1990


Watson, Edward B.

New York then and now : 83 Manhattan sites photographed in the past and in the

present

New York : Dover Publications, 1976.

F128.37 .W37
White, Norval, 1926-

AIA guide to New York City 4th ed.

New York : Three Rivers Press ; Member of The Crown Publishing Group, c2000.



NA735.N5 A78x 2000





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