Section 1 south carolina's intriguing landscape (statewide overview) Index Map to Study Sites



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SECTION 1
SOUTH CAROLINA'S INTRIGUING LANDSCAPE (STATEWIDE OVERVIEW)

Index Map to Study Sites


2A

Table Rock (Mountains)

5B

Santee Cooper Project (Engineering & Canals)

2B

Lake Jocassee Region (Energy Production)

6A

Congaree Swamp (Pristine Forest)

3A

Forty Acre Rock (Granite Outcropping)

7A

Lake Marion (Limestone Outcropping)

3B

Silverstreet (Agriculture)

8A

Woods Bay ( Preserved Carolina Bay)

3C

Kings Mountain (Historical Battleground)

9A

Charleston (Historic Port)

4A

Columbia (Metropolitan Area)

9B

Myrtle Beach (Tourist Area)

4B

Graniteville (Mining Area)

9C

The ACE Basin (Wildlife & Sea Island Culture)

4C

Sugarloaf Mountain (Wildlife Refuge)

10A

Winyah Bay (Rice Culture)

5A

Savannah River Site (Habitat Restoration)

10B

North Inlet (Hurricanes)

TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR SECTION 1
SOUTH CAROLINA'S INTRIGUING LANDSCAPE (STATEWIDE OVERVIEW)
- Index Map to Study Sites
- Table of Contents for Section 1
- Power Thinking Activity - "The Hydrophobic Horse"
- Performance Objectives
- Background Information

- Description of Landforms, Drainage Patterns, and Geologic Processes

p. 1-2 . . . . . - South Carolina's Five Landform Regions

p. 1-2 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-1 - "Landform Regions of South Carolina"

p. 1-3 . . . . . - Differences Between Piedmont and Coastal Rivers

p. 1-4 . . . . . - Drainage Patterns and Watersheds

p. 1-5 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-2 - "State Map of Major Drainage Basins"

p. 1-6 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-3 - "Average Annual Precipitation"

p. 1-6 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-4 - "Average Annual Temperature"

p. 1-7 . . . . . - Geological Events that Shaped South Carolina's Landscape

p. 1-8 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-5 - "Geologic Cross-Section of South Carolina"

p. 1-9 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-6 - "The Geologic Time Scale and South Carolina"

p. 1-11 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-7 - "Geologic Map of South Carolina"
- Influence of Topography on Historical Events and Cultural Trends

p. 1-12 . . . . . - Native Americans

p. 1-12 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-8 - "Map of Native American Nations"

p. 1-13 . . . . . - Early Explorers

p. 1-13 . . . . . - The English Influence

p. 1-13 . . . . . - Natural Features as Effective State and County Boundaries

p. 1-15 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-9 - "Barbecue Regions of South Carolina"

p. 1-15 . . . . . - Historical Reasons for Placement of State and County Boundaries

p. 1-16 . . . . . - How Places Get Their Names

p. 1-17 . . . . . . . . . - story - "How Kingstree Got Its Name"

p. 1-17 . . . . . - The American Revolution and South Carolina

p. 1-18 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-10 - "Revolutionary War Campaigns in South Carolina"

p. 1-18 . . . . . - Colonial Prosperity Through Rice, Indigo, and Cotton

p. 1-19 . . . . . - President George Washington's Southern Tour

p. 1-20 . . . . . . . . . - story - "Diary of the First Presidential Visit to the Palmetto State"

p. 1-28 . . . . . - 1818 Internal Improvement Act and the Building of Canals

p. 1-28 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-11 - "Map of South Carolina Canals"

p. 1-29 . . . . . . . . . - story - "Excerpt From 1818 Internal Improvement Act"

p. 1-30 . . . . . - The Coming of the Railroads

p. 1-31 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-12 - "Map of Antebellum Railroads - 1860"

p. 1-32 . . . . . - Charleston Businessman's Trips Across South Carolina in 1860

p. 1-32 . . . . . . . . . - story - "The Diary of Samuel Edward Burges 1860-1862"

p. 1-36 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-13 - "Map of Civil War Campaigns in South Carolina"

p. 1-37 . . . . . - The American Civil War and South Carolina

p. 1-37 . . . . . - Legacy of the Civil War

p. 1-37 . . . . . - Benjamin Tillman and a New Era for South Carolina

p. 1-37 . . . . . - The Civil Rights Movement in South Carolina

p. 1-38 . . . . . . . . . - figure 1-14 - "Population Density Map (1990)"


- Natural Resources, Land Use, and Environmental Concerns

p. 1-39 . . . . . - Soils and Land Use

p. 1-39 . . . . . - Water Pollution

p. 1-41 . . . . . - Habitat Alteration


- Summary
- Places to Visit
- References and Resources

- STUDY AREA 1 : STATEWIDE OVERVIEW



(ICONS) Overv = Q Sci = R Math = : Hist = & Lang Arts = ?

- Activity 1-1 : State Landform Regions

- Materials
- Performance Tasks

p. 1-49 . . . . . . . . . 1. investigate the five landform regions Q

p. 1-49 . . . . . . . . . 2. locate the 18 SC MAPS study sites Q

p. 1-49 . . . . . . . . . 3. make chart listing age, geologic era, and rock type R Q

p. 1-50 . . . . . . . . . 4. estimate percentage of state in each landform region :

p. 1-51 . . . . . . . . . 5. determine types of state boundary lines R

p. 1-51 . . . . . . . . . 6. compare size of your county to entire state :

p. 1-51 . . . . . . . . . 7. calculate slope from mountains to the sea :

p. 1-51 . . . . . . . . . 8. estimate travel time to cross South Carolina :

p. 1-51 . . . . . . . . . 9. determine distance between shorelines :

p. 1-52 . . . . . . . . . 10. determine coordinates of each study site :

p. 1-52 . . . . . . . . . 11. calculate straight line distance between study site pairs :

p. 1-53 . . . . . . . . . 12. relate average rainfall and temperature data to elevation differences R
- Enrichment

p. 1-53 . . . . . . . . . 1. compare SC landform regions with rest of USA R

p. 1-53 . . . . . . . . . 2. research, predict population changes :R

p. 1-53 . . . . . . . . . 3. research boundary line dispute between SC and GA &


- Activity 1-2 : State Drainage Patterns

- Materials


- Performance Tasks

p. 1-54 . . . . . . . . . 1. trace three major river drainage basins Q

p. 1-54 . . . . . . . . . 2. trace three coastal river drainage basins Q

p. 1-55 . . . . . . . . . 3. assess threats to habitat in different drainage basins Q

p. 1-55 . . . . . . . . . 4. write a story about salamander's river journey ?

p. 1-56 . . . . . . . . . 5. write a story about opossum's after school journey ?


p. 1-56 . . . . . . . . . 6. determine the percentage area of the state in each drainage basin :

p. 1-56 . . . . . . . . . 7. investigate reasons for building canals &

p. 1-57 . . . . . . . . . 8. trace pathway of industrial pollutant R
- Enrichment

p. 1-57 . . . . . . . . . 1. research Scenic River Act &

p. 1-57 . . . . . . . . . 2. compare Up Country and Low Country rivers R
- Activity 1-3 : Landforms Influence History and Culture

- Materials


- Performance Tasks

p. 1-58 . . . . . . . . . 1. trace President George Washington's South Carolina visit, 1791 Q

p. 1-59 . . . . . . . . . 2. analyze President George Washington's writing style ?

p. 1-59 . . . . . . . . . 3. outline Washington's southern tour using modern day highways & R

p. 1-59 . . . . . . . . . 4. examine Washington's entries about agriculture and land cover &

p. 1-59 . . . . . . . . . 5. determine Washington's daily rate of travel : &

p. 1-59 . . . . . . . . . 6. list influential people Washington mentioned in his diary & R

p. 1-60 . . . . . . . . . 7. write a descriptive skit about George Washington's tour ?

p. 1-60 . . . . . . . . . 8. plan a modern day tour of your county & R ?

p. 1-60 . . . . . . . . . 9. trace Charleston Businessman's trip & R

p. 1-60 . . . . . . . . . 10. compare travel differences 1700's - 1900's &

p. 1-61 . . . . . . . . . 11. speculate how town names reflect local landforms Q

p. 1-61 . . . . . . . . . 12. analyze census of Native American Nations Q:

p. 1-62 . . . . . . . . . 13. locate Native American national territories &:

p. 1-62 . . . . . . . . . 14. compare Native American census data to modern population density &

p. 1-62 . . . . . . . . . 15. analyze effects of landforms on Revolutionary War campaigns &

p. 1-62 . . . . . . . . . 16. explain geographic distribution of barbecue regions of South Carolina &

p. 1-63 . . . . . . . . . 17. analyze spelling of word "barbecue" ?


- Enrichment

p. 1-63 . . . . . . . . . 1. research origins of selected city names & ?

p. 1-63 . . . . . . . . . 2. research South Carolina place names ?

p. 1-63 . . . . . . . . . 3. research people Washington met on southern tour &

p. 1-63 . . . . . . . . . 4. choose a Native American Nation to research & ?

- Activity 1-4 : Landforms and Land Use

- Materials
- Performance Tasks

p. 1-64 . . . . . . . . . 1. determine city size and reason for location Q

p. 1-64 . . . . . . . . . 2. compare land use/land cover map with soils map R

p. 1-64 . . . . . . . . . 3. explain how water is used by various businesses Q R

p. 1-64 . . . . . . . . . 4. explain obstacles to transportation in 1800's &

p. 1-65 . . . . . . . . . 5. locate reservoirs and list uses R

p. 1-65 . . . . . . . . . 6. explain impact of railroads on economy &

p. 1-65 . . . . . . . . . 7. compare rail travel costs 1842 - 1883 :

p. 1-65 . . . . . . . . . 8. relate early railroad lines to locations of county seats &

p. 1-66 . . . . . . . . . 9. investigate nicknames for cities ?

p. 1-66 . . . . . . . . . 10. trace flight path of Cessna :

- Enrichment

p. 1-68 . . . . . . . . . 1. research land use management programs R

p. 1-68 . . . . . . . . . 2. monitor stream pollution near your school R

p. 1-68 . . . . . . . . . 3. construct timeline of transportation Q &

p. 1-68 . . . . . . . . . 4. research information about the railroad closest to your school R ?

p. 1-68 . . . . . . . . . 5. locate and research railroad tunnels R &


SECTION 1
SOUTH CAROLINA'S INTRIGUING LANDSCAPE (STATEWIDE OVERVIEW)

POWER THINKING ACTIVITY - "The Hydrophobic Horse"


You are an explorer arriving in the Carolina Colony in the summer of 1730. Your mission is to travel from the coast, the lowest point in the colony, to Sassafras Mountain, the highest point, in what will one day be the state of South Carolina. Use the STATE BASE MAP #1, SHADED RELIEF, and a wipe-off pen to trace your path. (Sassafras Mountain is located in the northwestern section of this map.) You may land your ship anywhere you wish along the coastline; however you have discovered that your horse, whom you have brought with you across the ocean, has developed an absolute hatred of water and will not cross water again under any circumstances. Find at least one route by which you can travel all the way from the coast to Sassafras Mountain without crossing water. You may however cross swamps because a summertime drought has left most swampland temporarily dry.


PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES
1. Recognize and interpret evidence of geological events that shaped the state's five landform regions.

2. Examine the impact of the state's river systems, watershed areas, and drainage patterns on early settlements as well as on today's economy.

3. Identify and retell stories about origins of South Carolina place names.

4. Relate the topography of the state to historical events and economic growth.

5. Use diaries to compare and contrast early customs, modes of travel, political concerns, descriptions of landforms, and location of towns with those of today.

6. Compare early transportation systems and their role in the development of towns with modern interstate highways and their economic impact on major cities of today.

7. Analyze the impact of manufacturing, agriculture, and tourism on the state's natural resources.

8. Use real world situations to illustrate concepts of measuring area, perimeter, and length.

9. Recognize, examine, and interpret the meaning of state base map and topographic map symbols.
BACKGROUND INFORMATION


Description of Landforms, Drainage Patterns, and Geological Processes

South Carolina's Five Landform Regions
South Carolina literally stretches from the mountains to the sea. Along the way it incorporates many distinctive regions, landscapes, cultures, and histories, each of which has its own fascinating story to tell. Yet each of these stories is related in some way to the underlying geology which provides the framework for understanding past and current economic trends, population distribution, agricultural choices, and land use patterns. South Carolina is known neither as a very large nor a very small state. It is not particularly famous nor unusually commonplace among other states. In terms of geographic, cultural, and historical diversity, however, South Carolina definitely qualifies as a special place, extremely interesting, intriguing, and unique to both residents and visitors alike. Each unique landform region has had a lasting impact on the state, not only in terms of its physical geography, but also on its human and biologic communities.
Figure 1-1: Landform Regions of South Carolina

There are many possible ways to subdivide South Carolina into geographic landform regions. Geologists tend to use rock type as the defining characteristic, while geographers look more towards common economic and cultural ties to define a region. Political scientists, historians, soil scientists, and linguistic experts all have their own criteria for establishing regional boundaries. Some approaches recognize as few as three regions in South Carolina while others assign six or more categories to the same area. The SC MAPS curriculum has selected landscape characteristics and land use patterns as the most important basic criteria for subdividing the state and has used this standard to establish five distinct landform regions for South Carolina:


Blue Ridge - characterized by mountains and recreational land use

Piedmont - characterized by low rolling hills, industry, agriculture, and forests

Sandhills/Midlands - characterized by sandy hills and poor soils

Coastal Plain - characterized by flat land, forests, and agriculture

Coastal Zone - characterized by active coastal processes and tourism
These regions essentially run in broad bands parallel to the Atlantic Ocean coastline. Likewise, maps showing the distribution of geologic formations, vegetation, climate zones, and soils project this same banded pattern. Elevations decrease steadily from over 3000 feet in the Blue Ridge Mountains to sea level at the coast. Consequently, most major rivers run from northwest to southeast, crossing several landform regions on their way to the ocean. Boundaries between regions are quite clear and easy to distinguish in some parts of the state, but are very arbitrary in others. For all statewide maps, the lines shown represent the best approximations of regional boundaries at the given scale of the map.

Differences Between Piedmont and Coastal Rivers
All stream sediment is formed originally from the disintegration of solid rock by both chemical and physical weathering processes. Physical processes, such as the freezing of water and the growth of plant roots into cracks, tend to break rocks into smaller and smaller fragments. Chemical processes, such as oxidation and hydrolysis (chemical reactions involving water), alter the original minerals and produce soluble products which are carried off in solution. Runoff from rainfall carries these products (rock fragments, sand, clay, and dissolved ions) into streams where water currents are able to transport the material for great distances.
The largest sediment grain sizes are normally found in the mountains where stream energy is the highest. As grains move downstream, they are progressively rounded, sorted and made smaller until they reach silt or clay size. Larger grains roll or slide along the stream bottom while finer sediment is carried in suspension. The dissolved materials eventually are carried to the ocean where they add to the total salt content of the ocean. In areas of extensive erosion, such as the Blue Ridge and Piedmont regions, every rainstorm adds more silt and mud to the stream system to be carried farther towards the ocean. Rivers in these regions have enough energy to erode and downcut the landscape and therefore occupy relatively narrow valleys with small floodplains and fairly straight channel paths. Stream courses are fairly constant through time and are usually underlain by solid rock.

In contrast, streams which originate in the Coastal Plain, below the Fall Line Zone, generally have much lower energy and flow more slowly. As a result, they are able to carry much less sediment. Rainfall also runs off the land very slowly because land slopes are low, a fact which limits the amount of local erosion which can occur. Any sediment which is introduced into these streams usually gets deposited very rapidly into sandbars or mudflats associated with very wide, swampy floodplains. River courses are usually meandering and tend to change position frequently within the floodplain. It is very unusual to find rocks along the river bank or anywhere else on the floodplain. Such rivers are often stained a dark color by tannic acid derived from the decomposition of organic materials along the river course.



Drainage Patterns and Watersheds
All land areas which drain into a particular river system are said to be part of that river's drainage basin, or watershed. Each watershed is separated from other surrounding watersheds by higher elevation ridgelines called drainage divides. Every stream, no matter how small, has its own drainage basin from which it gathers water from runoff and sediment from erosion. Several small tributary watersheds, when taken together, serve as the combined watershed area for larger streams. In general, larger streams tend to have larger total watersheds. For example, the Santee River, the largest in the state, has by far the biggest watershed area in South Carolina.
South Carolina rivers, in contrast to those in other parts of the country, often undergo name changes as they travel from the mountains towards the sea. In the Santee River drainage system, for example, the Broad and Saluda rivers join to form the Congaree River, while the Catawba River changes its name to the Wateree River. The Congaree and Wateree rivers then join downstream to form the Santee River. In actuality, this river is the longest on the east coast, but this fact is relatively unknown outside of South Carolina because of the many name changes the river experiences.
Three major river systems, the Savannah, Santee, and Pee Dee, cross the entire state, carrying sediment eroded from the Appalachian Mountains to be deposited on the beaches and barrier islands along the coast. Together these three river systems drain about 80% of the state and are characterized by having large quantities of suspended silt and red clay carried in the water flow. These rivers undergo a dramatic shift in flow behavior and erosional and depositional dynamics as they pass through the Fall Line Zone from the Piedmont into the Coastal Plain.
Many smaller river systems, such as the Edisto, Ashley, and Coosawhatchie rivers, which originate in the Coastal Plain, are associated with comparatively small watersheds which tend to drain into the ocean rather than into other rivers. A few of these rivers in the Coastal Zone Region may be quite wide, but also very short. These are essentially glorified tidal channels which have no significant drainage basin other than the surrounding marsh and tidal flat areas. For the purposes of the SC MAPS activities, the watersheds of all Coastal Plain rivers are lumped together into a single category and are referred to as the Coastal Plain Drainage Basin.


Figure 1-2: State Map of Major Drainage Basins


Figure 1-3: Average Annual Precipitation


Figure 1-4: Average Annual Temperature

With the exception of oxbow lakes, sinkhole lakes, and Carolina Bay lakes, all of which are small in area, all lakes in South Carolina are actually man-made reservoirs. Of the three largest river systems in South Carolina, only the Pee Dee has remained a free-flowing river throughout the 20th century. Major dams and reservoirs can be found all along the other systems in all parts of the state. They provide hydroelectric power, municipal water supplies, and opportunities for recreation and tourism. Dams can also have adverse effects on a region and may cause an increase in water loss due to evaporation, change local climates, and act as sediment traps which greatly reduce the flow of sand to coastal regions. As a result, parts of the South Carolina coast are literally starved for sand and are experiencing severe beach erosion.


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