Scotland and the Impact of the Great War, 1914-1928 Exemplar 2



Download 45.38 Kb.
Date conversion24.05.2016
Size45.38 Kb.


Scotland and the Impact of the Great War, 1914-1928

Exemplar 2
One ‘How far...’ question on issue 3 – ‘Domestic impact of war: industry and

economy’
One ‘How far...’ question on issue 4 – ‘Domestic impact of war: politics’

One Comparison question on the issues above (or any of their sub-issues)

5. Scotland and the Impact of the Great War, 1914-1928

Study the sources below and then answer the questions which follow.
Source A: from The National Archives of Scotland 1901-1938.

In the 1920s unemployment levels grew as soldiers returned from the Great War. Overseas trade was poor as countries tried to recover from the impact of war and there was an economic slump in the heavy industries. Prospects of earning a living in agricultural or industry were limited. The government had greater involvement in developing policies and schemes with settlement agencies to relieve the pressure on Scotland by finding alternative employment opportunities overseas. In 1921, the Overseas Settlement Committee, set up in Britain with government support to provide assistance to people wanting to emigrate, granted free passage to ex-servicemen and women until the end of December 1922. The Committee produced a report in which it highlighted the need to develop an Empire Settlement Policy. The 1931 census showed a drop in Scotland's population for the first time since official records began in1801. The use of emigration to ease unemployment in Scotland in the 1920s was not viewed favourably by all.


Source B: from ‘Scotland and the Impact of the Great War’ by John A Kerr.
In 1918 the Labour Party's election manifesto promised to fight for the complete restoration of the land of Scotland to the Scottish people but these proposals did not catch the public's imagination or support. In the 1920s all three major parties actively supported the union and Home Rule bills in parliament in 1924 and 1927 went nowhere.

Nevertheless there were some who continued to campaign actively for an independent Scotland and in the 1920s economic distress made more people listen to the arguments for independence.

Radical nationalists wanted to resist the erosion of Scottish culture and Scottish identity by the spread of Englishness in all aspects of life. Artists, writers and poet, such as Hugh MacDiarmid, styled themselves as a Scottish literary renaissance and took pride in their attacks on those who, in their view, had sold out to England.

In May 1928 in the National Party of Scotland was founded but its leaders, Roland Muirhead and John McCormick, received only 3000 votes in the 1929 general election, less than 5% of the vote in each constituency.


Source C: from the Glasgow Herald 14 April 1923.
This weekend is witnessing emigration from Hebrides on a scale comparable only to that experienced in the early 1880s.

Thirty families, numbering some 400 souls, are leaving Benbecula, South Uist and Barra to seek a future for themselves and their children on the land of Alberta, Canada. This scheme was initiated by the Rev Father McDonnell. Another priest visited Canada and reported on the prospects to the intending emigrants who, it is understood, will be accompanied to their new home by two priests. The emigration is being carried out by arrangement with the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Their ship, the Marloch, will early this afternoon sail from Greenock with about 700 Scottish emigrants, many of them of the tradesmen class going out to seek employment in Canada or take up work on the land.



Next weekend a second party will sale from Stornoway with between 400 and 500 persons. They are going out with the encouragement of the Ontario, Canada government.
Source D: from Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, 1920-1930
There is a distinct change of feeling in the islands regarding immigration in these post war years caused by encouraging reports being received from crofting families who have gone out from Barra and South Uist and the other reason for this change of attitude is the readiness on the part of some priests to consider emigration as a means of improving the condition of the people and escaping unemployment and destitution at home. It is most desirable that the Scottish Office should not overlook the idea of land settlement in the dominions and in particular in Canada. The Canadian government is apparently willing to do its part. A deputation of two South Uist crofters and a priest from Barra left for the dominion of Canada at the expense of the Canadian government to select the most suitable localities for settling the folk from the Hebrides.


Questions
Marks

1 How far does Source A explain the reasons why so many Scots left Scotland after 1918?

Use the source and recalled knowledge. 10

  1. How far does Source B illustrate the crisis in Scottish identity that developed after 1918?

Use the source and recalled knowledge. 10

  1. To what extent do Sources C and D agree about post war emigration from Scotland?

Compare the sources overall and in detail 5

Marking Instructions
Question 1 How far does Source A explain the reasons why so many Scots left Scotland after 1918?
The candidate makes a judgment on how far Source A explains the reasons why so many Scots left Scotland after 1918 in terms of:
Points from the source which show the candidate has interpreted the significant views:


  • In the 1920s unemployment levels grew as soldiers returned from the Great War

  • There was an economic slump in the heavy industries.

  • Prospects of earning a living in agricultural or industry were limited.

  • Government assistance to people wanting to emigrate, granted free passage to ex-servicemen and women until the end of December 1922.



Points from recall which support and develop those in source:


  • Despair and hopelessness as the economy crashed in 1920 following the collapse of the short-term restocking boom.

  • Employment insecurity in the cities – periodic slumps due to the trade cycle.

  • Scotland's economy depended heavily on export markets.

  • Scotland's economy depended heavily on heavy industry, coal, shipbuilding, iron and steel.

  • The slump at the end of the First World War encouraged/forced many to emigrate, particularly to the ‘white dominions’.

  • Overseas Settlement Committee led to Empire settlement Act, 1922. It provided the first large-scale state-assisted migration programme undertaken by the British government.



Points from recall which offer a wider contextualisation such as:


  • Unemployment much higher than the UK average.

  • Scotland paid the price for overconcentration on a narrow range of industries.

  • Output in shipbuilding fell from 650,000 tons to 74,000 in 1933. The coal industry saw production fall from 42.5 million tons in 1913 to an average of 30 million tons.

  • Attractions of ‘white dominions’: Pull factors – land, opportunity, family/blood ties.

  • Empire settlement Act, 1922 - official British efforts to increase emigration from the British Isles to Canada and other countries in the Empire. Over 400,000 people received state subsidies totalling £6 million, assisting their travel to a variety of imperial destinations, mainly in the dominions, during the inter-war period.

  • As many as 1 in 3 emigrants from Scotland did return having failed to be successful.

  • Any other relevant points.

Question 2 How far does Source B illustrate the crisis in Scottish identity that developed after 1918?


The candidate makes a judgment on how far Source B illustrates the crisis in Scottish identity that developed after 1918 in terms of:
Points from the source which show the candidate has interpreted the significant reasons:


  • In the 1920s all three major parties actively supported the union. Home Rule bills went nowhere.

  • Lack of popular support for Labour Party's election manifesto promise to fight for restoration of the land of Scotland to the Scottish people.

  • Scottish culture and Scottish identity seen by some as being eroded by the spread of Englishness in all aspects of life.

  • Lack of support for new National Party of Scotland – its leaders gained less than 5% of the vote in each constituency.


Points from recall which support and develop those in source:


  • Revived support for Conservatives/ Unionists in post war years.

  • Conservatives and Liberals gave no support to Scottish Home Rule.

  • Weakness of Labour Party in parliament in 1920s.

  • Post war patriotic support for UK left little room for nationalist sympathies or support.

  • Increasing support in some areas for nationalism – National Party of Scotland established in 1928, leaders McCormick and Muirhead.

  • Influence of Scottish Literary Renaissance artists in creating / reviving sense of identity but only in small artistic areas. Some artists reflected lamenting the end of old Scottish way of life e.g. Grassick Gibbon – ‘Sunset Song’.


Points from recall which offer a wider contextualisation such as:


  • Support for conservatives / unionists not caused only by crisis of Scottish identity. Also by collapse of Liberal Party across UK, radicalization of working classes in Scotland, and the growth of ILP/Labour Party.

  • Conservatives seen as barrier against ‘red menace’ that was claimed to threaten the British way of life. Middle classes still saw future as being part of union.

  • Main stream popular newspapers all strongly pro-union.

  • Economic troubles in 1920s saw Scotland suffering more than many parts of England. Heavy reliance on old industries, the products that had made Scotland the workshop of the Empire.


  • The Scottish Renaissance also had a profound effect on the Scottish independence movement, and the roots of the Scottish National Party may be said to be firmly in it. However in 1920s there was very little national support for separation.

  • In UK terms Scottish identity reduced to quaint tartan clad music hall routines such as Harry Lauder.

  • Any other relevant points.


Question 3 To what extent do Sources C and D agree about post war emigration from Scotland?
The candidate makes a judgment on how far Sources C and D agree about post war emigration from Scotland in terms of:
Overall, both sources are contemporary accounts of emigration from the Hebrides in the 1920s and agree on how it was arranged, the destination, the assistance given by the Canadian government and motives for migration.


Points from Source C


Points from Source D







  • The scheme was initiated by Rev. Father MacDonnell.




  • They are going out with the encouragement of the Ontario, Canada, government.



  • Many of the tradesmen class going out to seek employment in Canada or take up work on the land.







  • Crofting families who have gone out from Barra and South Uist.




  • Readiness on the part of some priests to consider emigration




  • The Canadian government is apparently willing to do its part at the expense of the Canadian government.




  • Escaping unemployment and destitution at home.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page