School Unit: Social Studies This is a school unit plan using Columbus Chapel and Boal Mansion Museum content and collection. This unit plan is designed to fit into school curricula and satisfies many of the History Standards of the Commonwealth of



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School Unit: Social Studies
This is a school unit plan using Columbus Chapel and Boal Mansion Museum content and collection. This unit plan is designed to fit into school curricula and satisfies many of the History Standards of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The standards satisfied are listed here.
The school unit plan contains:


  1. Lesson plans

  2. Activities

  3. PowerPoints


These were designed for the Eighth or Ninth Grade level and are based on the internationally-recognized:


  1. Boal family history

  2. Columbus Chapel collection

  3. Weapons collection and particularly the Civil War weapons


This is an invaluable teaching resource for Eighth and Ninth Grade teachers.
Curriculum guide by James Moorhead, Penn State intern
Also available online at http://boalmuseum.com, click on Eighth Grade School Unit Plan
-see next page-
School unit plan using

the Columbus Chapel and Boal Mansion Museum
Table of Contents

Click on heading for further content


Chapter 1: Boal Family
Section 1: Boal Family Lesson Plan:
Boal Family Tree: Overview of the Eight Generations and some themes of the Boals

Overview of the Boal Family

Boals of Boalsburg reading
Section 2: Genealogy Activity:
Boal Family group sheet

Family Tree Activity

Pedigree Chart

Family group sheet

Map to use for the Activity
Section 3: Power Point for the Boal Family
Chapter 2: The Columbus Chapel
Vocabulary for the Columbus Chapel
Section 1: Columbus Chapel Lesson Plan:
The Columbus Family Chapel Reading

Christopher Columbus Reading


Section 2: Coat of Arms Activity Lesson Plan:
Coat of Arms Activity

Columbus Coat of Arms


Section 3: Power Point for the Columbus Chapel
Chapter 3: The Weapons Room
Section 1: Boal Troop/Civil War Reading Lesson Plan:
They Died in France for Liberty: Boal Troop Reading

Boal Troop Questions

Civil War Weapons Reading

Civil War Questions and short answer questions


Section 2: Civil War Activity Lesson Plan:
Civil War Activity

Civil War Confederate/Union Map


Section 3: Power Point for the Weapons Room

Boal Family
Chapter 1: Section 1: Boal Family Lesson Plan:
Teacher: Lesson: Boal Family (Mansion)
Grade Level/Subject: 8th Grade American History Length: 2 days
Section One: Identifying all standards and District Standards
8.1.9A. Analyze chronological thinking

8.1.9B Analyze and interpret historical sources.

8.1.9C Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation

8.1.9D Analyze and interpret historical research.

8.2.9A Analyze the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.2.9B Identify and analyze primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.2.9D Identify and analyze conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9A Identify and analyze the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to United States history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9B Identify and analyze primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in United States history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9D Identify and analyze conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in United States history from 1787 to 1914.
Performance Standards:

In order to meet Standards, students will be able to:
Identify the all the different generations of Boal’s through a genealogical map
Analyze how the Boal Family is the story of America, the emerging nation.
Analyze how all of the themes of America are seen through this family.

Which are seeking cheap land and freedom, beginning of community and commerce, Rise of the common man to political office, Educated and made lots of money and spent money, elegant, international?


Identify the different aspects of how the Boal Family shaped Boalsburg
Analyze primary documents on the Boal Family.
Essential Questions:

In order to understand, students will need to consider the following questions


Why did the first David Boal come to America from Northern Ireland?
Why do you think that the Second David Boal returned to Ireland to fight in the revolution of 1798 against the British? Would you? Why or Why not?
Who is Boalsburg named after and in what year did the name change from Springfield to Boalsburg?
Why do you think George and the Centre County Agricultural Society petitioned the state to establish the Farmers High School in Centre County?

Who was the first Boal generation to grow up in America?

Which two Boal family members were attorneys and part of the state House of Representatives?

What was the name of the Civil War troop that John Boal help organize?


Why did George Jack Boal move to Denver, Colorado?

Why did Terry Boal go to Paris?

What was Pierre a lance corporal in?

What did Terry organize while Pierre was in France? What was also a first in National Guard history?
Section Two: Identifying methods of assessment and point of use throughout lesson
Formative Assessment: Worksheet made up for the readings
Section Three: Identifying the learning activities/instructional practices
Materials: notebook, pencil, The Boal’s of Boalsburg reading and the Worksheet on the Boal of Boalsburg reading
Anticipatory Set: Look at the photos on the Board. Does anyone know who these men are or what they did?
Transition: Let the students know that they will be learning about a very influential family from this area, which is the Boal Family.

Activities:


  1. Teacher will have the students look at the overview of the family before they start to read the Boal’s of Boalsburg reading.

  2. Teacher will hand out the Boal’s of Boalsburg reading to the students.

  3. Teacher and students will read the Boal’s of Boalsburg reading orally as a group.

  4. Teacher will do review of the reading with the students hitting on all of the main points of the story.

  5. Teacher will handout the questions from the story to the students

  6. Students will finish the questions independently at their seats

The Boal Family Tree

Eight Generations and some themes

For more information: http://boalmuseum.com

  1. David Boal Sr.1 “Seeking cheap land and freedom”

  2. David Boal Jr. (1764-1837)2 “Beginning of community and commerce”

  3. Hon. George Boal (1796-1867)3 “Rise of the common man to political office. Invested in education.”

  4. “Got educated and made lots of money.” David C. Boal4, Capt. John Boal (d. 1865)5, George Jack Boal (1835-1895)6 married Malvina Amanda Buttles (1835-?), parents of:

  5. Col. Theodore Davis Boal (Terry) (1867-1938) “Spent the money. Elegant, international”7 married Mathilde de Lagarde (1871-1952)8

  6. Ambassador Pierre de Lagarde Boal (1895-1966) “Continued the heritage”9 married Jeanne de Menthon (1898-1984)10

  7. Mathilde (Mimi) Boal Lee (1920- )11 married Gov. Blair Lee III (1916-85)12

  8. Christopher Gist Lee (1948- )13

Boal Mansion Genealogy, Eight Generations

(Text of a brochure given visitors to the Museum)


First Generation: Capt. David Boal Sr.
Captain of the Cumberland County Militia which protected this part of Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary War. Built a two room stone cabin in 1789 (now used as the kitchen).
Second Generation: David Boal Jr. (1764-1837)
Captain. Joined the Irish Rebellion of 1798 against the British in Ireland. Escaped in the blanket chest in 1798. Added hallway, parlor, living room and dining room in 1798. Built a tavern in 1804 around which the village was laid out in 1809. The village was renamed Boalsburg in 1823 in honor of David Boal Jr.
Third Generation: Hon. George Boal (1796-1867)
Captain of militia, Associate Judge of Centre County and member of the State House of Representatives (1840’s). Was president of the Centre County Agricultural Society in 1852 when they petitioned the Commonwealth to establish the Farmers High School here, now called The Pennsylvania State University.
Fourth Generation: Hon. David C. Boal (1822-1859)
Lawyer in Bellefonte. Member of the State House of Representatives.
Fourth Generation: Capt. John Boal (1838-1865)
Captain in the 9th Pa. Vol. Cavalry during the Civil War. Killed in action in Averysboro, North Carolina in March 1865.
Fourth Generation: George Jack Boal (1835-1895)
Went west to Iowa and became a lawyer. Married Malvina Amada Buttles, whose brother-in-law was the Egyptologist Theodore M. Davis. Later moved to Colorado to practice law representing mining interests.
Fifth Generation: Col. Theodore Davis Boal (Terry) (1867-1938)
Added ballroom, servants’ quarters, farmers’ quarters in 1898. Built carriage house in 1900. Imported Columbus Chapel from Spain in 1909 and in 1912 installed the chapel in stone building on the estate. Founded Boalsburg’s fire, electric, telephone, water and bus Companies. In 1916 founded a cavalry troop which pursued Poncho Villa in New Mexico with Gen. Pershing. Mounted machine guns on Ford trucks, first instance in Pa. National Guard history. Served in France with the 28th Division during WWI; won a Distinguished Service Cross in the Argonne Forest. Founded the 28th Division Shrine across the road in 1919.
--married—
Mathilde de Lagarde (1871-1952)
Niece of Victoria Montalvo Colon, wife of Diego Colon, a direct descendant of Christopher Columbus. Great-granddaughter of Eugene de Beauharnais (Napoleon’s stepson) and Louise de Trobriand (sister of Gen. James de Trobriand and cousin of Simon Bolivar). In 1908 inherited the Columbus Chapel from her aunt, Victoria Montalvo Colon.
Sixth Generation: Ambassador Pierre de Lagarde Boal (1895-1966)
Joined French cavalry in 1914. By 1916 was a pilot in the Lafayette Escadrille and then a captain in the US Army Air Corps. Joined U.S. Foreign Service in 1920, eventually serving as Ambassador to Nicaragua and Bolivia. Opened the Boal Estate to the community as a museum in 1952.
--married--
Jeanne de Menthon (1898-1984)
From the same family as Bernard de Menthon, who was canonized in 1126. In the 10th century he created two monasteries in the Alps as hospices for travelers and installed Augustinian monks in them. In the 17th century the monks trained dogs to rescue travelers in the French Alps and the dogs were named after St. Bernard. Hence the St. Bernard dogs.
Seventh Generation: Mathilde (Mimi) Boal Lee (1920- )
International champion swimmer in the Masters Division.
--married—
Governor Blair Lee III (1916-85)
Governor of Maryland in the 1970’s, direct descendant of Richard Henry Lee of Virginia who signed the Declaration of Independence, and a lateral descendant of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.
Eighth Generation: Christopher Lee
Current resident and Museum CEO. Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, Harris Township. President of the Boalsburg Village Conservancy. A founder of the Boalsburg Village Conservancy, the Boalsburg Heritage Museum and the Boalsburg Memorial Day Festival.
Columbus Chapel
The chapel was brought to the Boal Estate in 1909 from the Columbus family castle in Asturias, Spain. It contains an admiral’s desk used by Columbus, the Columbus family archives dating from 1453 to 1908, two pieces of the True Cross, and an exceptional collection of European art dating from the 15th century up to the 18th century.
First Exhibit Room
Contains 19th century French dolls and puppets. Also houses a small, but significant, collection of medieval weapons plus a 1/12th scale model of the Santa Maria and a collection of walking sticks.
Country Life Exhibit Room
Houses farm equipment from the days when the estate was a working farm and the implements of daily live before the electric age. Contains Col. Boal’s formal carriage and a buckboard made in Boalsburg.
Weapons Room
Displays a collection of muskets and rifled muskets from before the Revolutionary War to just after the Civil War. Also displayed are seven of the most significant carbines used during the Civil War. Contains a classic Pennsylvania rifle from 1799 and the last evolution of this form of rifle made in 1830 in Boalsburg. Also displayed are souvenirs from WWI including helmets, rifles and rare German machine gunner’s body armor. Finally the collection includes about 30 swords including a collection of cavalry sabers used by the U.S. Army up through the Civil War.

The Boals of Boalsburg

Two Hundred Years of A Pennsylvania Heritage

Written by Christopher Lee. Edited for this guide by James Moorhead

Published in 1989 by in Pennsylvania Heritage Magazine, a publication of

the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

Reprinted by permission.
What is the story of America? The question stirs the imagination, bringing images of rugged pioneers stalking the vast wilderness, of hardworking farming families, and of village merchant’s meager livelihoods in America’s heartland. Much of the story is devoted to communities and their dedication to building schools, churches, and stable local economies. Surely, military, political and industrial endeavors are part of the story, as well as the contributions and customs of the seemingly endless waves of immigrants that began reaching the New World and, particularly, Pennsylvania-early eighteenth century.

The story of America is also the story of Boal Family of Boalsburg, generation of spirited adventurers, whose evolution is a remarkable reflection of all that has transpired in Pennsylvania during two centuries. There is also the story of the Boal Mansion, where the family’s saga began in the late eighteenth century and where it continues, a tradition unbroken-to this day.


Family tradition holds that the family patriarch, David Boal, emigrated from County Antrim, Ireland, and fought as a captain during the American Revolution. Through a letter from the fifth generation Theodore Davis Boal to his son Pierre nothing that “David Boal Sr., commanded a company of Cumberland militia in the Revolutionary War and his son, David Boal Jr., after serving in the Revolutionary Army, returned to Ireland to take part in the revolution of 1798.”
At the time that David Boal Sr., settled in 1789 in what is now Centre County, the entire region was an immense wilderness, populated by few settlers. Today, his cabin, serves as the kitchen of the Boal Mansion.
David Boal Jr. return to this country, according to Theodore Davis Boal, “was made possible in putting him in a large chest and hoisting him aboard ship after the collapse of the Revolutionary movement.” He and his wife, Nancy Young Boal, together with two children, Elizabeth and George, returned to his father’s cabin and in 1798 added a two story, three bay wide, Georgian style farmhouse, which included a front hall, dining and living rooms and a parlor. Their two youngest children, Mary and John, were born in Boalsburg.
According to John Blair Linn, author of the 1883 history of Centre and Clinton counties, Pennsylvania, David Boal was recommended in August 1804 for a license to keep a tavern, which still stands on East Main Street in Boalsburg. Originally called Springfield, Boalsburg was named to honor David Boal, “a much respected and highly influential citizen of the place,” when a local post office was established in 1820. David, who laid out an addition to the community in 1832, served as an elder of the Slab Cabin (Presbyterian) Church until his death at the age of seventy-three in 1837. His wife died in 1834.
Their son, George, was of the first Boal generation to grow up in America. Born July 16, 1796, in Country Antrim, Ireland, he eventually became a leader in Centre County during a period in which residents promoted educational and economic developments, as well as the institutions which enhanced them.
Although a farmer all of his life, George intensely dedicated to the development of education in Pennsylvania. In 1834, he lobbied for the creation of a General System of Education by Common School, part of the statewide movement that resulted in the establishment of the Commonwealth’s first tax-supported school system for children. In 1853, he was one of the founders of the Boalsburg Academy that emphasized a scholarly, rather than a practical or vocational, curriculum.
George Boal served as president of the meeting of the Centre County Agricultural Society on January 23, 1855, during which Hugh McAlister; his son’s law partner offered the resolution to establish an agricultural high school in the county with funding by the state legislature. The Farmer’s High School opened on February 19, 1859, and today-known as the Pennsylvania State University-is the largest employer in Centre County. George Boal died in 1867.
George was nominated in 1839 by the county Democratic convention for the state House of Representatives. He was defeated by a vote of 1,178 votes to 1,004, but the convention held again in August of 1840 again nominated him for the assembly. Elected, he served in Harrisburg until 1841.
George and Nancy Boal’s eldest son, David C. Boal, was born March 27, 1822, graduated from Jefferson College, Canonsburg, and worked as an attorney with Hugh McAlister of Bellefonte. In June 1851, he married Frances Burnside. Four years later he followed in his father to the state House of Representatives on the Democratic Whig ticket. He died at the age of thirty-seven in 1859.
Another son, John, born in 1838, organized a Civil War troop, the Penn’s Valley Infantry, enlisted at Boalsburg on August 31, 1861, and serving as Company G, Forty-Ninth Regiment. He was commissioned captain of Company A, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry of the 92nd Pennsylvania Regiment. On March 11th 1865, after General Robert E. Lee’s surrender- but before the news was received- John Boal was killed at Averysboro, North Carolina, on Sherman’s march to the sea. He was buried in a federal cemetery in Raleigh, North Carolina.
John’s elder brother, George Jack Boal, born in 1835, attended the Boalsburg Academy, the Boalsburg Academy, and moved in 1857 to Iowa City, then Iowa’s state capital. He became a lawyer and married in 1861 Malvina Amanda Buttles. In 1868 George Jack Boal was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States. He twice declined the Democratic nomination for a seat in the Congress and once for the governorship of Iowa. He moved to Denver to be an attorney for the mining company controlled by wealthy New York industrialist J.B. Wheeler. George Jack and Malvina Boal had five children, but only one, Theodore Davis Boal, lived to raise a family of his own.
Theodore Davis Boal- or Terry as he was called- lived a life of far-flung international travel, supported by the seemingly boundless wealth acquired by the previous generation. Terry traveled to Paris to study architecture, where he met the beautiful Mathilde Denis de Lagarde, whom he married in 1894. They had one son Pierre. They returned to Boalsburg in 1898. Terry added a Ballroom, servants and farmers quarters to the original stone cabin. Terry also founded the Boalsburg fire, electric, telephone, water and transportation companies. Terry outfitted his own machine gun troop in Boalsburg. After training at his Camp Boal, now the site of the 28th Division Shrine and the Pennsylvania Military Museum, the troop was dispatched to the Mexican border to capture Pancho Villa. At the border, Terry outfitted Ford trucks with machine guns- possibly the first mounted machine guns in National Guard history. Terry Boal’s machine gun troop departed for Camp Hancock, Georgia, to train for European battle. Terry left his machine gun troop to join the commanders of the 28th troop as an aide-de-camp for the 28th division. On Terry’s death bed in 1938 he said “I had the honor of inheriting three fortunes and the pleasure of spending them.
Terry’s son Pierre, a lance corporal in the First Regiment of the Cuirassier, cavalry unit, served in campaigns in northern France in Picardy and in Belgium in Flanders. He later enrolled in the Lafayette Flying Corps, a group of American aviators serving in French uniform before the United States joined the war. Pierre was a captain and the supervising officer of the American Army Pilots and Observers Assigned to French Air Squadrons. In Paris in 1919, he married Jeanne de Menthon who lived near the French Alps in the Chateau de Menthon. Pierre then joined the State Department, which took him all over the world, including Europe, Canada, and Latin America. He later served as U.S. Ambassador to Nicaragua and Boliva. Pierre and Jeanne’s daughter Mathilde married Maryland’s Governor Blair Lee III. Pierre after he retired from the Diplomatic Corps opened the Mansion up to the public as a Museum in 1952.
--End—

Boal’s of Boalsburg Reading Questions



  1. Why did the first David Boal come to America from Northern Ireland?



  1. Why do you think that the Second David Boal returned to Ireland to fight in the revolution of 1798 against the British? Would you? Why or Why not?




  1. Who is Boalsburg named after and in what year did the name change from Springfield to Boalsburg?




  1. Why do you think George and the Centre County Agricultural Society petitioned the state to establish the Farmers High School in Centre County?



  1. Who was the first Boal generation to grow up in America?



  1. Which two Boal family members were attorneys and part of the state House of Representatives?



  1. What was the name of the Civil War troop that John Boal help organize?


  1. Why did George Jack Boal move to Denver, Colorado?



  1. Why did Terry Boal go to Paris?



  1. Who did Terry marry and why was this sufficient?



  1. What was Pierre a lance corporal in?



  1. What did Terry organize while Pierre was in France? What was also a first in National Guard history?



  1. Who did Mimi Boal marry and who was he?


Chapter 1: Section 2: Genealogy Activity:
Teacher: Lesson: Genealogy Activity
Grade Level/Subject: 8th Grade American History Length: 3 days
Section One: Identifying all standards and District Standards
8.1.9A. Analyze chronological thinking

8.1.9B Analyze and interpret historical sources.

8.1.9C Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation

8.1.9D Analyze and interpret historical research.

8.3.9A Identify and analyze the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to United States history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9B Identify and analyze primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in United States history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9D Identify and analyze conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in United States history from 1787 to 1914.


Performance Standards:

In order to meet Standards, students will be able to:
Identify all the different generations of Boal’s through a genealogical map
Analyze the chronology of their family, by using chronological thinking
Analyze and interpret historical research, finding the genealogy of their family
Identify the different ethnic groups and their contributions that they distributed to the USA.
Analyze the documents of your family’s history
Essential Questions:

In order to understand, students will need to consider the following questions:


Where did your family come from?
How many different generations can you find out about your family?
Why did your family come to America?
Where did you find the information about your family?
How has your family contributed to the United States?

Section Two: Identifying methods of assessment and point of use throughout lesson
Formative Assessment: The family tree that they will make
Section Three: Identifying the learning activities/instructional practices
Materials: notebook, pencil, the genealogical activity worksheet, timeline
Anticipatory Set: Does anyone know how their family came to America?
Transition: Let the students know that they will be making a family tree about their own family.
Activities:


  1. Teacher will show a model of a good family tree which will be the Boal Family tree.

  2. Teacher will hand out family tree activity

  3. Teacher will give the students time in the computer lab ( First day)

  4. Teacher will give the students time in the Library (Second day)

  5. Students will work on their family tree

  6. Students will present them to the class in a short 3 min presentation(Third day)

Boal Family group sheet
Boal Genealogy

(compiled c. 1970)


1. David Boal, born in Ireland

  1. David

  2. John, who moved to Union County

  3. William, who moved to Virginia

  4. __________, who moved to Bedford County

2. David Boal, born 1764 in Ireland. Died 1837 March 14.

He was an elder in the Slab Cabin Presbyterian Church.

Married Nancy Young. Their children:



  1. George

  2. Elizabeth, married _______________ Brisbane

  3. Mary, married Hiland Biddle

  4. John

6. George Boal, born 1796 July 16 in Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland.

First married to Nancy jack, daughter of Michael and Susannah Jack and granddaughter of Jacob Jack who died in Harris Township in 1812 (1829?). Michael was a brother-in-law of Alexander Dunlap of Lancaster County. The children of George Boal and Nancy Jack were:


  1. David C.

  2. George Jack

  3. James Wilson (died young)

  4. John, entered service in the Civil War and resigned 1862 October 25 on account of ill health. Re-entered service first as captain of militia company in emergency, 1863. Commissioned captain of Co. A, 9th Pa. Cav. (92nd Regt.). Killed in action at Averysboro, NC, 1865 March 13. Took part in Sherman’s March to the Sea. Buried in the Raleigh NC National Cemetery (Section 15, #1170).

  5. Susanna, married ____________ Foster. Lived in Oak Hall and had

    1. Mary

    2. Elizabeth

    3. And four other children

  6. Nancy Young, married _____________ Clark

  7. Mary, married Thomas Dale. They had no children.

After the death of nancy Jack, George married Mrs. Elizabeth (Williams) Johnston. The children of George and Elizabeth Boal were:

  1. Elizabeth Maria, married John I. Thompson (son of Moses Thompson of Centre Furnace).

  2. Robert Hamill

9. John Boal, born 1804 May 1 in Centre County.

Married Isabel Huey in 1831. In 1838 he moved to Jackson Township, Venango County. He was a carpenter. He died in 1831. Their children:


  1. Elizabeth, married W_______ W________ Andrews of Crawford County and had seven children

  2. George, a physician in Beaver County

  3. William

  4. David C.

  5. Robert

  6. Mary

  7. John, born 1846 April 13

10. David C. Boal

He married Frances, daughter of Supreme Court Judge Thomas Burnside (brother of Gen. Burnside). He was a lawyer in Bellefonte. Their children:


  1. George O’Brien

  2. Nellie, married F_____ M____ Barnes of Washington DC.

11. George Jack Boal, born 1835 October 10

He married Malvina Amanda Buttles, daughter of Joel Benoni Buttles of Warren, Ohio. He moved to Iowa in 1857 and died in Denver, Colorado 1895 May 17. Their children


  1. George Buttles

  2. Anna Theodora

  3. Theodore Davis

  4. Montgomery Davis

  5. Frederick

Family Tree Activity


Name: Date:
Instructions: You will investigate your own family history and try to make a family tree. See if you can go back nine generations like the Boal family.

How many of us have a Richard Henry Lee, a Queen Isabella, or a Theodore Davis Boal in our families past of whom we were never aware?

Each of the experiences that we are going to have doing this activity will bind us to our history and to the history of our nation. Sometimes the more personal the moment, the more meaningful it becomes when inserted into the larger history of an area, a state, or a country. Answers to the historical why's, who's and when's can be seen in the personal histories of families.

Objectives:


  1. Locate on a map the country or countries and, where possible, the region or city, from which your family originated before coming to the United States.

  2. Locate on a map of the United States the states and communities in which your family settled upon first arriving in the United States and major family moves since that arrival.

  3. Using information that you found, identify the primary time frames in which families settled in a particular state or community.

  4. Using information that you found, identify the reasons why your family settled in a particular state or community.

  5. Make a family tree for your own family

  6. Identify the different resources that you used to find your information

  7. Describe in oral presentation (3 min long) your family's history

What you need in your family tree:

Each student should bring to class as complete a family history as possible which includes the following information: Name (maiden), date of birth, place of birth, year in which earliest known family member came to the United States, purpose of immigration, year earliest known family member relocated into current community and state, reason for relocation, and any major relocations by previous generation within the U.S. and the reasons for these relocations



Good places to start to get information about your family:

You can "interview" one of your grandparents, great-grandparents, aunts, or uncles, or if none of these are possible, one of your parents. The purpose for the interview should be to obtain an oral history of your family’s history, with particular attention to the information that you need for your family tree. You should also ask if there were any "colorful" or perhaps famous people in the family's past.



Pedigree Chart

_______________

|(8) father of 4

__________________|b.

|(4) father of 2 |d.

|b. |


|m. |________________

|d. (9) mother of 4

| b.

| d.


__________________|

|(2) father of 1 | _________________

|b. | |(10) father of 5

|m. | |b.

|d. |_________________|d.

| (5) mother of 2 |

| b. |

| m. |_______________



| d. (11) mother of 5

| b.


___________________| d.

person 1 |

b. | _________________

m. | |(12) father of 6

d. | |b.

| _________________|d.

| |(6) father of 3 |

| |b. |


| |m. |________________

|_________________|d. (13) mother of 6

(3) mother of 1 | b.

b. | d.


m. |

d. | _________________

| |(14) father of 7

| |b.


|_________________|d.

(7) mother of 3 |

b. |

m. |_________________



d. (15) mother of 7

_____________________ b.

spouse of person 1 d.

b.

m.



d.

www.jelleyjar.com

Family Group Sheet

========================================================================

Husband:

born: place:

marr: place:

died: place:

buried: place:

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wife:


born: place:

died: place:

buried: place:

========================================================================

CHILDREN

========================================================================


#1

born: place:

marr: place:

died: place:

buried: place:

spouse:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
#2

born: place:

marr: place:

died: place:

buried: place:

spouse:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
#3

born: place:

marr: place:

died: place:

buried: place:

spouse:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
#4

born: place:

marr: place:

died: place:

buried: place:

spouse:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
#5

born: place:

marr: place:

died: place:

buried: place:

spouse:


------------------------------------------------------------------------

www.jelleyjar.com

Map to use for the Activity





Section 3: Power Point for the Boal Family
Teacher: Lesson: Boal Family power point
Grade Level/Subject: 8th Grade American History Length: 1 day
Section One: Identifying all standards and District Standards
8.1.9A. Analyze chronological thinking

8.1.9B Analyze and interpret historical sources.

8.1.9C Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation

8.1.9D Analyze and interpret historical research.

8.2.9A Analyze the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.2.9B Identify and analyze primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.2.9D Identify and analyze conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9A Identify and analyze the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to United States history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9B Identify and analyze primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in United States history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9D Identify and analyze conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations in United States history from 1787 to 1914.
Performance Standards:

In order to meet Standards, students will be able to:
Identify the all the different generations of Boal’s through a genealogical map
Analyze how the Boal Family is the story of America, the emerging nation.
Analyze how all of the themes of America are seen through this family.

Which are seeking cheap land and freedom, beginning of community and commerce, Rise of the common man to political office, Educated and made lots of money and spent money, elegant, international


Identify the different aspects of how the Boal Family shaped Boalsburg
Analyze primary documents on the Boal Family.
Essential Questions:

In order to understand, students will need to consider the following questions


Why did the first David Boal come to America from Northern Ireland?
Why do you think that the Second David Boal returned to Ireland to fight in the revolution of 1798 against the British? Would you? Why or Why not?
Who is Boalsburg named after and in what year did the name change from Springfield to Boalsburg?
Why do you think George and the Centre County Agricultural Society petitioned the state to establish the Farmers High School in Centre County?

Who was the first Boal generation to grow up in America?

Which two Boal family members were attorneys and part of the state House of Representatives?

What was the name of the Civil War troop that John Boal help organize?


Why did George Jack Boal move to Denver, Colorado?

Why did Terry Boal go to Paris?

What was Pierre a lance corporal in?

What did Terry organize while Pierre was in France? What was also a first in National Guard history?
Section Two: Identifying methods of assessment and point of use throughout lesson
Formative Assessment: Worksheet made up for the readings
Section Three: Identifying the learning activities/instructional practices
Materials: notebook, pencil, Boal family power point
Anticipatory Set: Can someone tell me a few things that you have learned about the Boal Family?
Transition: Let the students know that today we will do a review of everything that we have learned, so far through a Power point about the Boal family.
Activities:


  1. Teacher will go over the Power point on the Boal family with the students

  2. Teacher and students will review the Boal family PowerPoint

  3. Students will ask any questions that they have regarding the Power Point


Chapter 2: The Columbus Chapel

Vocabulary for Columbus Chapel


Directions: Define each word by looking it up in a dictionary, and then write one sentence using that word in the correct form.
Fortification-

Franciscan Order-


Reliquary-


Monastery-


Coat of arms-


Renaissance Period-



Chapter 2: Section 1: Columbus Chapel Lesson Plan:

Teacher: Lesson: Columbus Chapel


Grade Level/Subject: 8th Grade American History Length: 2 days
Section One: Identifying all standards and District Standards
8.1.9A. Analyze chronological thinking

8.1.9B Analyze and interpret historical sources.

8.1.9C Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation

8.1.9D Analyze and interpret historical research.

8.4.9A Analyze the significance of individuals and groups who made major political and cultural contributions to world history before 1500.

8.4.9B Analyze historical documents, material artifacts and historic sites important to world history before 1500.
Performance Standards:

In order to meet Standards, students will be able to:
Analyze the chronological order Christopher Columbus’s voyage
Analyze different historical sources about the Columbus Chapel
Analyze Christopher Columbus and the contributions that he made to world history
Analyze the historical artifacts of the Columbus Chapel

Essential Questions:

In order to understand, students will need to consider the following questions


How did the artifacts in the chapel come to Boalsburg?
What do the different things on the Columbus coat of arms mean?
How did Josef colon acquire two pieces of the true cross?
What year did Terry bring the interior of the chapel to Boalsburg?
Who was Christopher Columbus?
Section Two: Identifying methods of assessment and point of use throughout lesson
Formative Assessment: Worksheet made up for the readings
Section Three: Identifying the learning activities/instructional practices
Materials: notebook, pencil, Columbus Chapel Reading and Christopher Columbus Reading
Anticipatory Set: Can someone please tell me where Asturias is?
Transition: Let the students know that we will be learning about Christopher Columbus and the Columbus Chapel
Activities:


  1. Teacher will hand out the Christopher Columbus reading

  2. Teacher and students will read the Christopher Columbus reading orally as a group.

  3. Teacher will do review of the reading with the students hitting on all of the main points of the story.

  4. Teacher will handout the questions from the story to the students

  5. Teacher will hand out the Columbus Chapel reading

  6. Teacher and students will read the Columbus Chapel reading orally as a group.

  7. Teacher will do review of the reading with the students hitting on all of the main points of the story.

  8. Teacher will handout the questions from the story to the students

  9. Students will finish the questions independently at their seats

Chapter 2: Section 2: The Columbus Family Chapel Reading


Two non-digital reading documents: Available free upon request from the Columbus Chapel and Boal Mansion Museum. Contact: office@boalmuseum.com or telephone 814-466-9266.
1) “News of the Nation: Columbus Gets the Nod” Four pages with drawings.
2) “The Columbus Family Chapel” from Columbia, June 1991. Two pages with photographs.

Questions for the Columbus Family Chapel Reading



  1. Who was Christopher Columbus and what did he do?



  1. How did the artifacts in the chapel come to Boalsburg?



  1. What year did Victoria Columbus die?


  1. Who inherited the Columbus Chapel?



  1. What do the different things on the Columbus coat of arms mean?


  1. How did Josef colon acquire two pieces of the true cross?


  1. What year did Terry bring the interior of the chapel to Boalsburg?


Chapter 2: Section 2: Coat of Arms Activity Lesson Plan:
Teacher: Lesson: Coat of arms activity
Grade Level/Subject: 8th Grade American History Length: 1 day
Section One: Identifying all standards and District Standards
8.1.9A. Analyze chronological thinking

8.1.9B Analyze and interpret historical sources.

8.1.9C Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation

8.1.9D Analyze and interpret historical research.

8.4.9A Analyze the significance of individuals and groups who made major political and cultural contributions to world history before 1500.

8.4.9B Analyze historical documents, material artifacts and historic sites important to world history before 1500.
Performance Standards:

In order to meet Standards, students will be able to:
Analyze the chronological order of your family, so that you can think of the important things that your family has done.
Analyze different historical sources about your family.
Analyze the different contributions that you and your family members made to the area that you are from.
Analyze the historical documents about your family.

Essential Questions:

In order to understand, students will need to consider the following questions


What is your greatest achievement and Why?
What are your greatest influences in your life?
Does your coat of arms have any similarity to the Columbus coat of arms?
What would your family motto be?
Why did you pick the symbols that you picked to illustrate you?
Does every family have a coat of arms?
Section Two: Identifying methods of assessment and point of use throughout lesson
Formative Assessment: Coat of Arms that is made for the activity
Section Three: Identifying the learning activities/instructional practices
Materials: notebook, pencil, coat of arms with what you need on it, blank coat of arms, directions for the activity
Anticipatory Set: Can someone please tell me what a coat of arms is used for?
Transition: Let the students know that we will making our own coat of arms today.
Activities:


  1. Teacher will hand out the Christopher Columbus’s coat of arms for the students to examine

  2. Teacher and students will talk about Columbus’s coat of arms

  3. Teacher will hand out the coat of arms with what you need on it, the blank coat of arms and the instructions for the activity

  4. Teacher will go over the instructions with the students

  5. Students will work independently on their coat of arms



Chapter 2: Section 2: Coat of Arms Activity

Columbus’s Coat of Arms

Name: Date:
Instructions:

Each section of the coat of arms represents different things about ourselves, our values, our lineage and our history.  Go through each section in order and think of different things that can apply in that section. 

1.  Your greatest personal achievement to date
As a character, this can be anything from a victory in battle to the achievement of a title. 

Personally, it can be gaining a degree, a job, raising children, maintaining friendships. . . think about all of the things you can be proud of and choose the one the most dear to you.

2.  The state, region or place you identify yourself with.
For your character, consider the county they are from or the name of the estate upon which they were reared. 

Personally, this can be our state, region, street name. . .whatever speaks of home most. 

3.  Your family's greatest achievement
Same as #1, but this time think about your or your character's lineage-- parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc. Did they emigrate from another land?  Set up a successful business?  Serve in the military?  For your character, think in terms of service to the Monarch or achievements on the battlefield.  Also, is your character descended from a Monarch? 

4.  Three symbols that illustrate the goals you hope to attain in the future.   
First, think about what your goals are-- personally and as a character.  Then, perhaps, think in terms of what goal you want to achieve in the next five years, the next 15 years, and before you die. 

Or, as a character, you can think about goals you wish to pursue for your family name and, perhaps, for your children.

5.  The two things you do well.
Pretty self-explanatory.  Consider your own talents-- personally or as a character-- in terms of your pastimes or your work/school. 

6.  The greatest influence(s) on you
Your greatest influences could be people in your life or things that motivate you-- a mentor, a family member, a friend. . . or money, jewels, pride, advancement, appreciation. . .

7.  One word that describes your most admirable trait.
Also pretty self-explanatory-- both for a character and for yourself. 

8.  The Motto





A favorite expression or quote-- one that describes you or your outlook on life. 
Personally, choose a quote or phrase that encourages you or keeps you going.

Once you have some ideas for each of those sections, find some images, symbols or single words/phrases that sum up each section.  Have Fun!!!!!!!
Non-digital documents: Blank coat of arms for student activity available upon request from the Columbus Chapel and Boal Mansion Museum. Contact: office@boalmuseum.com or telephone 814-466-9266.

Section 3: Power Point for the Columbus Chapel
Teacher: Lesson: Columbus Chapel
Grade Level/Subject: 8th Grade American History Length: 2 days
Section One: Identifying all standards and District Standards
8.1.9A. Analyze chronological thinking

8.1.9B Analyze and interpret historical sources.

8.1.9C Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation

8.1.9D Analyze and interpret historical research.

8.4.9A Analyze the significance of individuals and groups who made major political and cultural contributions to world history before 1500.

8.4.9B Analyze historical documents, material artifacts and historic sites important to world history before 1500.
Performance Standards:

In order to meet Standards, students will be able to:
Analyze the chronological order Christopher Columbus’s voyage
Analyze different historical sources about the Columbus Chapel
Analyze Christopher Columbus and the contributions that he made to world history
Analyze the historical artifacts of the Columbus Chapel
Essential Questions:

In order to understand, students will need to consider the following questions


How did the artifacts in the chapel come to Boalsburg?
What do the different things on the Columbus coat of arms mean?
How did Josef colon acquire two pieces of the true cross?
What year did Terry bring the interior of the chapel to Boalsburg?
Who was Christopher Columbus and what did he do?
Section Two: Identifying methods of assessment and point of use throughout lesson
Formative Assessment: Worksheet made up for the readings
Section Three: Identifying the learning activities/instructional practices
Materials: notebook, pencil, Columbus chapel power point

Anticipatory Set: Can someone please me what we have learned, so far about the Columbus Chapel?
Transition: Let the students know that we will be learning about Christopher Columbus and the Columbus Chapel
Activities:


  1. Teacher will go over the Power point on the Columbus Chapel with the students

  2. Teacher and students will review the Columbus Chapel PowerPoint

Students will ask any questions that they have regarding the Power Point

Section 3: Power Point for the Columbus Chapel

Chapter 3: The Weapons Room
Section 1: Boal Troop/Civil War Reading Lesson Plan:
Teacher: Lesson: Weapons Room reading
Grade Level/Subject: 8th Grade American History Length: 2 day
Section One: Identifying all standards and District Standards
8.1.9A. Analyze chronological thinking

8.1.9B Analyze and interpret historical sources.

8.1.9C Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation

8.1.9D Analyze and interpret historical research.

8.2.9A Analyze the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.2.9B Identify and analyze primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in Pennsylvania history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9A Identify and analyze the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to United States history from 1787 to 1914.

8.3.9B Identify and analyze primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in United States history from 1787 to 1914.

.

Performance Standards:



In order to meet Standards, students will be able to:
Analyze the chronological thinking and interpret historical sources of how the Boal troop started in Boalsburg to finishing fighting in France.
Analyze the contributions that Terry Boal made, so that the Boal Troop could be outfitted.
Analyze a primary document that was written about the Boal Troop by Joe Horvath and the document about the Civil War weapons.
Analyze the weapons room at the Boal Mansion Museum to see some of the guns that Terry brought back from WWI and also look at the Civil War weapons.

Essential Questions:

In order to understand, students will need to consider the following questions


Why did Terry start the Boal Troop?
How did Terry outfit the Boal Troop?
What does Preparedness Movement mean?
Where was Camp Boal located at?
Where were a lot of the soldiers from?
What was the Boal Troop known as by the National Guard?
What war was the Boal Troop in?
What kinds of weapons were used in the Civil War?
Why do you think that some of these weapons were used?

Section Two: Identifying methods of assessment and point of use throughout lesson
Formative Assessment: Worksheet made up for the readings
Section Three: Identifying the learning activities/instructional practices
Materials: notebook, pencil, Boal Troop Reading, Questions for the Boal Troop Reading, Civil War weapons reading, Questions for the Civil War reading
Anticipatory Set: Would anyone like to start their own cavalry someday?
Transition: Let the students know that we will be learning about the Boal Troop today.
Activities:


  1. Teacher will hand out the Boal Troop reading

  2. Teacher and students will read the Boal Troop reading orally as a group.

  3. Teacher will do review of the reading with the students hitting on all of the main points of the story.

  4. Teacher will handout the questions from the story to the students

  5. Students will finish the questions independently at their seats

  6. Teacher will hand out the Civil War Weapons reading

  7. Teacher and students will read the Civil War Weapons reading orally as a group.

  8. Teacher will do review of the reading with the students hitting on all of the main points of the story.

  9. Teacher will handout the questions from the story to the students

  10. Students will finish the questions independently at their seats

Chapter 3: Section 1: Boal Troop Reading


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