School of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies ma module Handbook 2015/16 The Arab-Israeli Conflict



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School of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies

MA Module Handbook

2015/16


The Arab-Israeli Conflict

Module No: 30157


Level: 7
Semester: 2
Credit Value: 20
Module Leader: Professor Raphael Cohen-Almagor
Pre-requisites: None

Co-requisites: None

Post-requisites: None

Anti-requisites: None


Total Contact: 11 x 2 hour weekly seminars

Assessment: 1 presentation in class (20%)

2 X 3,000 word essay (80%)
Staff contact: (Tel) 01482 465024

(Email) R.Cohen-Almagor@hull.ac.uk

(Web) http://ebridge.hull.ac.uk/

This handbook is available on request in alternative formats from the School Office


CONTENTS

1. General Outline and Aims of the Module

2. Learning Outcomes

3. Method of Teaching

4. Module Assessment

4.1 Essay plans and draft essays

4.2 Essay submission

4.3 Essay deadlines and late submission

4.4 Essay format

4.5 Plagiarism and ‘self-plagiarism’

4.6 Essay length

4.7 Mitigating circumstances and coursework extensions
5. Your Right of Appeal

6. Marking Criteria

7. Essay Titles

8. Seminar Topics and ‘Tips’

9. Reading List

10 Module Evaluation Questionnaires
PLEASE NOTE: the following sections should be read in conjunction with the Taught Masters Handbook, the relevant University Programme Regulations and the University Student Handbooks.
For Programme Regulations see: http://www2.hull.ac.uk/administration/policyregister/qualityhandbook/sectionb.aspx

The Student Handbook is available at: http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/studenthandbook.aspx


It is your responsibility to ensure that you are fully acquainted with all of the requirements set out in this handbook and in the associated documentation.

PLEASE NOTE: The School of PPIS operate a policy of continuous quality enhancement, reflecting on the previous year’s practice and specific feedback such as that gained through the Staff-Student Committee. This is intended to ensure that the School provides the highest quality student experience possible. The School is, on occasion, also required to amend its policies to ensure that they are fully compliant with University regulations and Faculty guidance. Students are advised to ensure that they consult that the Handbooks and Regulations they consult are the up-to-date versions.
1. GENERAL OUTLINE AND AIMS OF THE MODULE

The aim of this module is to provide students with good understanding of the Arab-Israeli conflict, its roots and complexities. This module explores the Arab-Israeli conflict both for its intrinsic importance and as a case study in contemporary world politics. The module is designed to equip students with sufficient knowledge to be able to analyse current events and decision-making processes, comprehending the best interests of each stake-holder in this protracted conflict. The module starts with an overview of the historical beginnings of the conflict when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire. It explains the significance of the Zionist Revolution, through World War 1, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). The module analyses processes that led to major wars between Israel and its Arab neighbours -- 1956, 1967, 1973, 1982, 2006, and the birth of the Palestinian problem. The module explores the Israeli occupation and the 1987-2002 Intifada. Finally, it discusses different proposals as to how the conflict can be resolved.



2. LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of the module students should have:


  • a sound knowledge of the history and evolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict;

  • a good understanding of complexities related to the Arab-Israeli conflict, its root causes and possible solutions;

  • a good understanding of the main actors;

  • a firm grasp of past and contemporary politics and contentions;

  • have a thorough grounding in and sound knowledge of the conceptual and political debates relating to the conflict;

  • a sound knowledge of decision-making processes;

  • the ability to undertake independent research on related issues.



3. METHOD OF TEACHING
Teaching will be by way of weekly seminars.
Attendance at all classes is compulsory unless otherwise advised and will be monitored accordingly. Students are also required to attend punctually. Failure to attend classes as required may have implications for a student’s progression. Further details regarding the relevant University regulations can be found at http://www2.hull.ac.uk/administration/leap/quality_standards/quality%20handbook/section%20k.aspx and in the Taught Masters Handbook.
Students can inform the School Office of reasons for absence at ppis-absences@hull.ac.uk Be advised that relevant documentary evidence, e.g. a letter from your GP, might be required in appropriate circumstances in support of any reasons given.

4. MODULE ASSESSMENT
The regulations regarding module assessment set out in this handbook must be strictly adhered to. Failure to comply with the regulations, including failure to accurately provide information required by the regulations, may result in the award of a mark of zero. The right of reassessment may also be denied. All such cases will be considered by the School’s Academic Progress Committee (SAPC).
4.1 ESSAY PLANS AND DRAFT ESSAYS
In order to ensure equity, students may submit an essay plan, consisting of headings and sub-headings, of no more than one side of A4 paper. Unless otherwise advised, this will normally be for discussion with the relevant member of staff during their scheduled office hours. Alternatively students may discuss with tutors the broad plan of their essay. Tutors will not comment on draft essays. Please note that the purpose of submitting an essay plan or discussing an essay is to gain advice on essay content.

Students concerned about essay preparation and writing skills (e.g. footnoting, bibliography, use of English etc.) should or seek advice from the University’s Study Advice Service. (For further details see http://www2.hull.ac.uk/lli/skills-development/essentials.aspx). The School will, as appropriate, also offer key skills events throughout the course of the academic year which students should attend.



4.2 ESSAY SUBMISSION
The submission of an essay, as defined in the Module Handbook, constitutes part of the formal assessment of this module. If you do not submit an essay and fail the module the SAPC may, irrespective of whether failure was due to non-submission of the essay, recommend to the Module Board that you be denied the right of reassessment.
Essay submission is a two stage process, involving the submission of an electronic copy AND a hard copy of your essay. Until you have completed BOTH of these stages you will be deemed not to have satisfied the submission requirements. It is your responsibility to ensure that you leave yourself sufficient time to complete the whole submission process.
Firstly, you must submit an electronic copy of your essay via TurnitinUK (see section 4.5 for further details of TurnitinUK). Instructions on how to do this, including on how to acquire a TurnitinUK ‘paper ID number’ verifying your essay submission are provided below. You must follow them carefully. You will not be able to submit the hard copy of your essay without the relevant TurnitinUK ‘paper ID number’.


  • To submit the electronic copy of your essay you should proceed as follows:

○ Go to http://www.submit.ac.uk

○ Click

○ Log in by entering your university email address and the TurnitinUK password which has been emailed to your university email account by TurnitinUK.

○ This will take you to your TurnitinUK homepage, on which are listed the modules for which you are registered this semester.

○ Click the title of the module for which you wish to submit an essay.

○ Click the icon which appears in the submit column.

○ Enter a submission title, attach the file which contains your essay and click submit.

Please note that TurnitinUK accepts the following formats: Microsoft Word, WordPerfect, RTF, PDF, Post-Script, plain text, and HTML)

○ Check that you have submitted the correct essay for this module and then click .

○ A digital receipt will now appear on screen. Directly below the title of the essay you have submitted you will see your ‘paper ID’ number. Write it down. This number is unique to the particular essay you have submitted for the module. You must enter this number when you complete the cover sheet which accompanies the submission of the hard copy of your essay.

Secondly, you must submit one hard copy of your essay. The hard copy submission must be an exact copy of the electronic copy. You must not alter it in any way. Submission of non-identical copies of your essay may be deemed to constitute use of unfair means and will be dealt with accordingly.


  • To submit the hard copy of your essay you should proceed as follows:

Essays must be deposited in the Politics Drop Box.

○ You must attach a completed School essay submission form to your essay. It is your responsibility to ensure that the essay submission form is completed in full and accurately. Where you fail to do so acceptance of your essay may be denied or you may be penalised in accordance with the regulations set out in this handbook.

○ You must submit your essay by the deadline indicated in the relevant Module Handbook. The date/time at which you submit the hard copy of your essay will be deemed to be the formal point of submission. Penalties for late submission will be calculated from this date/time

4.3 ESSAY DEADLINES AND LATE SUBMISSION PENALTIES

The University has a standardised set of regulations regarding late submission of assessed coursework (see http://www2.hull.ac.uk/administration/policy_register/quality_handbook/section_f.aspx ). The School must apply these regulations and so, since they could seriously affect your academic progress, it is essential that you are familiar with the following rules.


In accordance with paragraph 32(iv) of the University Code of Practice on Assessment Procedures and the marking conventions adopted within the School the following late submission penalties must be applied to coursework submitted after the published deadlines:

  • Up to and including 24 hours after the deadline, a penalty of 10 marks

  • More than 24 hours and up to and including 7 days after the deadline; either a penalty of 10 marks or the mark awarded is reduced to the pass mark, whichever results in the lower mark

  • More than 7 days after the deadline, a mark of zero is awarded.




Explanatory note
Example applying the penalties for coursework submitted up to and including 24 hours after the deadline:

  • If a student submits the assessment 2 hours after the deadline, the student’s mark will be reduced by 10 (so that a mark of 65 will be reduced to 55, a mark of 48 will be reduced to 38 and so on).

Examples applying the penalties for coursework submitted more than 24 hours and up to and including 7 days after the deadline:




Student

A

B

C

D

E

Pre-penalty mark

100

50

45

40

30

10 mark penalty

90

40

35

30

20

Or


Mark awarded is reduced to the pass mark

40

40

40

40

40




Outcome (the lower mark)

40

40

35

30

20





The system of penalties outlined above is subject to the over-riding proviso that students will not be penalised if they have a genuine reason (called a ‘mitigating circumstance’) which prevents them from submitting work on time. In order to ensure that penalties are applied where appropriate but that students with mitigating circumstances are not penalised unfairly, the School operates the following policies and procedures with regard to considering coursework submitted after the published deadline.
Within the School (and subject to the final paragraph of this section) essay submission dates are generally standardised across each academic stage. This means that you will have several essays to submit on one day. It does not, of course, mean that you should start work on them all at the same time! Time management is an essential study skill and it is your responsibility to ensure that all stipulated deadlines are complied with.

4.4 ESSAY FORMAT

Essays must be word-processed. Essays will be retained to allow for double marking and (where necessary) external verification. Students wishing to have a copy of their essay returned should submit work in duplicate.


Essays must be correctly referenced. The University Code of Practice Student Handbook dictates that students use either the Harvard or ‘footnote’ style of referencing, and that Schools and Departments decide which one of these styles is adopted (see Annexe 2 of the University Code of Practice Student Handbook). The School of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies has chosen to adopt the footnote system and advice for students on how to reference in accordance with this style is available at http://www2.hull.ac.uk/lli/skills-development/referencing.aspx Except where otherwise advised, this style of referencing must be employed by all PPIS students on all assessments. Quotations MUST be indicated either by the use of quotation marks or by indentation of the quoted text; use of a footnote is not, on its own, sufficient. Please also note that references are required not only when using a direct quotation. They must also be included when summarising, paraphrasing or interpreting arguments put forward by another scholar. Annotating essays is an integral part of essay writing and is, therefore, one of the many elements taken into account in marking work. Accordingly, essays which are not correctly referenced will be penalised. Failure to correctly reference may also give rise to an allegation of plagiarism (see Section 6 below).
A full bibliography, arranged alphabetically by author surname, should also be attached to the end of essays. The bibliography must contain all sources referred to, including sources of general use but not specifically cited in the footnotes.

4.5 PLAGIARISM AND ‘SELF-PLAGIARISM’
As noted in section 4.2 all assessed coursework must be submitted via TurnitinUK. This is an anti-plagiarism software package. This software compares essays against a number of sources and produces a report indicating the extent to which the essay matches these sources. Markers are then required to consider the matches indicated to ensure that, where the work of others has been used, it has been appropriately referenced. Where references are not properly provided the work may considered to be ‘plagiarised’.
Plagiarism - passing off the work of others as your own - is a serious academic offence. It is considered to be a use of ‘unfair means’ and the University, Faculty and School have clear policies to deal with it. ‘Self-plagiarism’ is also strictly prohibited. Self-plagiarism is the submission of a piece of work, in part or in whole, on more than one occasion and may be considered to be a form of unfair means.
All allegations of plagiarism (and all other matters relating to the use of unfair means) will be referred to the Dean of Faculty and will be dealt with in accordance with University regulations under the Code of Practice on the Use of Unfair Means available at http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/studenthandbook/academic/unfairmeans.aspx All students should fully apprise themselves of these documents.

TurnitinUK can be used as a developmental tool to support students in gaining a greater understanding of good academic practice. Under University regulations students must have access to the TurnitinUK’s ‘Playpen’ facility during the period for which they are eligible to receive a Caution under Unfair Means Regulations. Within the School the caution period applies to any student who is undertaking the Certificate stage of an Undergraduate programme of study – this includes candidates who are repeating that stage or have transferred to it from another programme – and any student who is undertaking the first semester of the Diploma, post Diploma or Honours stage of an Honours degree, having been admitted as a direct entrant to that stage. During the study skills session on plagiarism all eligible students will be shown how they may access and use the playpen facility.

4.6 ESSAY LENGTH
The University has a standardised set of regulations regarding over length assessments (see http://www2.hull.ac.uk/administration/policy_register/quality_handbook/section_f.aspx ). The School must apply these regulations and so, since they could seriously affect your academic progress, it is essential that you are familiar with the following rules.
This Module Handbook clearly specifies the maximum length of the essay which you must submit (see Section 6). Your essay should not exceed this limit. Essays which exceed the stipulated maximum word length will be penalised as set out below. There are two reasons for this: firstly, being able to produce work of a specified length is an important skill and an integral part of essay writing; secondly, ensuring that students’ work does not exceed a stipulated word length makes essay based assessment more equitable.


Amount over word limit

Consequence

Up to 10%

No marks deducted

10-20%

10 marks deducted

More than 20%

Mark of zero awarded


You must declare the word length of your essay on the cover sheet. In accordance with paragraph 30(v) of the University Code of Practice on Assessment Procedures an erroneous word count declaration must be dealt with as suspected use of unfair means and the matter must then be followed up according to the Regulations on the Use of Unfair Means. If no word count has been declared, or no coversheet submitted, students will be subsequently asked to declare a word count/submit a coversheet. If, within a period of 7 days, the word count is subsequently not declared/coversheet not submitted, the work must be awarded a mark of zero.
Please note that the essay title, citation footnotes/references and your bibliography must not be included as part of the declared word count. However, textual footnotes must be included in the word count. A citation footnote is one which simply shows the source(s) you have used e.g. J. Goldstein, International Relations (4th Edition) (New York: Longman, 2000) A textual footnote is one which is composed of prose and which is intended to provide the reader with information additional to that contained within the main body of text.
The following is included in the word count:

  • Contents page (if included);

  • All text, including section headings and sub-headings;

  • Textual footnotes (as defined above); and

  • Appendices, figures and tables which are annotated with prose that is intended to provide information additional to the main body of text.

The following is not included in the word count:



  • Citation footnotes (for definition, see above);

  • Bibliography (and/or List of sources); and·

  • Appendices, figures and tables which are not annotated with prose that is intended to provide information additional to the main body of text. This includes Time-plans, as well as tables that collate evidence from the material being analysed. Appendices, figures and tables in this category are aimed to complement and illustrate the main text and not to develop the argument being presented.


4.7 MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES AND COURSEWORK EXTENSIONS
Students must always endeavour to submit coursework on time and to attend examinations as scheduled. If, however, mitigating circumstances (e.g. a medical or personal problem) prevent you from being able to do so then you will need to act as follows:


  • If you are experiencing mitigating circumstances and you are able to bring these to the attention of the School prior to the date on which you are due to submit your coursework then you must to complete a Coursework Extension Request Form.

  • If you have been granted a coursework extension but subsequently fail to submit the work by the extended deadline then you must either request a further extension or, if the extended deadline has passed, you must complete a Mitigating Circumstances Form.

  • If you are experiencing mitigating circumstances and you are not able to bring these to the attention of the School prior to the date on which you are due to submit your coursework then you must to complete a Mitigating Circumstances Form.

  • If you are going to be unable to attend an examination on the scheduled date, or if you have missed an examination, then you must to complete a Mitigating Circumstances Form.

Whichever of the above situations applies, you are strongly advised to contact your Head of Year regarding the matter. Coursework Extension Request Forms and Mitigation Circumstances Forms are available via the School’s eBridge site or from the School Office. Both types of form must be submitted to the School Office. Extension requests and claims for mitigating circumstances must be supported by appropriate documentation (e.g. medical evidence).


Coursework Extension Requests and Mitigating Circumstances Forms will be considered by the School Academic Progress Committee (SAPC). Decisions of the SAPC will be communicated to students by the School Office as soon as possible. Where extension requests are not granted and submission dates are not subsequently met penalties for late submission will be applied in accordance with Section 4 above. Where claims for mitigating circumstances are not accepted then penalties will be imposed in accordance with Section 4 or a mark of zero awarded in accordance with University regulations.
Students should be aware that, under Paragraph 33(a) of the University’s Programmes Regulations - Honours Degrees, a student who has not met the specified module requirements relating to submission of assessed work or attendance at examinations may be denied the right of re-assessment in that module. Persistent failure to comply with submission deadlines or to attend examinations may, in accordance with Paragraph 35(a), result in exclusion from assessment and/or termination of a student’s programme of study. Failure to submit coursework on time or to attend examinations as scheduled may also adversely affect your chance of being referred in a module should you fail to pass it. Where the School does not refer a student in a failed module the student will be unable to graduate with honours within the prescribed period of study.
Mitigating Circumstances Forms must be submitted within 7 days of the essay submission date or date of the scheduled examination if they are to be considered by the School. If you fail to submit your mitigating circumstances within this 7 day limit they may only be considered by the School with the permission of the University’s Student Progress Committee.
Please note that computer problems (e.g. printing problems, corrupted or unreadable discs, incompatible software, lost or stolen hardware etc.) will not be accepted as grounds for late submission. The School will assume that you have taken all reasonable steps to protect your work. It is, therefore, strongly recommended that you backup your work on a regular basis onto your computer’s hard drive and a secure remote server.
Students with a registered disability, officially recognised by the University’s Disability Service should consult the School’s Disabilities Tutor regarding the submission schedule for their essays. As appropriate, the Disabilities Tutor will authorise staggered deadlines, but these must be formally applied for and agreed. Once agreed these deadlines must be strictly adhered to. Work submitted other than in accordance with this agreed schedule will be dealt with in accordance with the procedures outlined above.

5. YOUR RIGHT OF APPEAL
You have the right to appeal against decisions taken regarding your academic progress, including the award of a qualification. You may not, however, appeal against academic judgement. For further information see:

http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/studenthandbook/academic/academicappeals.aspx .


Impartial advice on appeals is available from the Students’ Union Advice Centre (details available at http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/studenthandbook/support/advicecentre.aspx ) or from the Senior Tutor responsible for students within the School of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies, Mrs Christine Murphy, who can be contacted on C.Murphy@hull.ac.uk.


6. ESSAY TITLES
Students must write two assessed essays for the assessment of this module.
FIRST ESSAY (3,000 words)
Choose one of the following titles:


  1. Was the 1956 War a just war?

  2. What are the advantages and constraints of third-party peace mediation conducted by small states?

  3. Is Ilan Pappe correct in asserting that Israel conducted “Ethnic Cleansing” in 1947-1948?

  4. Were the British during the 1940s neutral between Israel and the Arabs, pro-Arab or pro-Israeli?


Essay deadline: 12.00 noon, 4 April 2016

SECOND ESSAY (3,000 words)


  1. Was the 2006 War a just war?

  2. Does the European Quartet have a role in mediating peace?

  3. What was the British stand on the Arab-Israeli conflict in 1973-4?

  4. Were the British during the 1960s neutral between Israel and the Arabs, pro-Arab or pro-Israeli?



Essay deadline: 12.00 noon, Monday, 23 May 2016

7. SEMINAR TOPICS AND ‘TIPS’
Seminar topics:
Week 1: Understanding the Middle East and the Arab-Israeli Conflict

Week 2: The Rise of Zionism and Arab Nationalism

Week 3: World War I and Its Aftermath - Conflicting Promises: The Hussein-McMahon Correspondence, The Sykes-Picot Treaty, The Balfour Declaration 

Week 4: The Holocaust, World War II, The Israel War of Independence, and the Palestinian Naqba

Week 5: The 1956 Suez War and the Development of Palestinian Nationalism

Week 6: The 1967 Six Day War

Week 7: The 1973 Yom Kippur War

Week 8: The 1982 Lebanon War and the 1987 Palestinian Uprising (Intifada)

Week 9: From the 1993 Oslo Peace Accords, to 2000 Camp David and 2001 Taba

Week 10: The 2006 Israel-Hezbollah War and the Rise of Hamas to Power

Week 11: Looking Ahead: Prospects for “New Middle East”


Seminar tips:

The reading list for this module takes into account the availability of sources in the Brynmor Jones library. The reading list is not intended to be an exclusive one and you should be able to find many additional helpful sources (i.e. books and journal articles) in the library and increasingly also on the internet. Please contact the course coordinator if you are having difficulties in finding the appropriate literature for tutorial presentations and/or essays. However, please note that you are expected to undertake your own research in the library before seeking further assistance. The library staff will be able to point out where you might be able to find additional sources on a particular topic. You should attend one of the introductory sessions on how to use the library if you have not already done so.


The most important journals for this module are:
British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies

International Journal of Middle East Studies

Israel Affairs

Israel Studies Review

Journal of Palestine Studies

Journal of Peace Research

Middle East Journal


Middle Eastern Studies


Palestine-Israel Journal
Please note that many journals are available electronically. Please check the library’s catalogue and/or homepage for details on electronic journals.
When using electronic resources you must be discerning. Many recognised, refereed journals are now available on-line and these are an invaluable resource. At the other end of the scale is a vast array of material posted by people who know little if anything about the topic on which they have chosen to write. So it is crucial that you remember that anyone can post anything.
Finally, remember that the key in preparing for tutorials is that you should be able to make a worthwhile contribution to the topic of debate. You may find it advantageous to work in groups in preparing for tutorials (though work on essays should be yours and yours alone!) as discussing matters in this way can often help clarify them. Group working also allows for the division of labour, hence maximising the amount of material you can cover, and the sharing of books etc. Whichever working practice you adopt, it is not necessarily expected that you read everything listed, but it is expected that you read something!

8. Reading List
From September 2014 module reading lists will be available online. You can access your reading list directly from within the appropriate eBridge module site or by searching by module name or module code on:
http://readinglists.hull.ac.uk
Definitions of levels of reading recommendation as used in ReadingLists@Hull

The following definitions for levels of reading recommendation for items on reading lists were agreed in the Summer of 2014. Tutors have been asked to adopt these standard levels of recommendation and over the next academic year you will start to see them on reading lists. The Library will refer to these levels of recommendation in determining the likely demand for access to the listed books, and that will influence the number of copies purchased for the Library and the loan period.


Suggested for student purchase

Students will need to refer to this resource throughout the module and possibly subsequent modules, and may therefore find it useful to own a copy. Items suggested for student purchase will be provided by the Library.


Essential

These resources are key to the module. Students need to use them to support their understanding of the topics and themes covered by the module. Essential resources will also be provided by the Library.


Recommended

These are supplementary resources which expand on the topics and themes found in the “Suggested for purchase” or “Essential” reading material. Recommended resources will also be provided by the Library.


Background

Students with a desire to research the topic more fully may wish to consult these resources but will not need to do so to pass the module. These resources will normally be provided by the Library. In some cases students may need to approach their department for guidance on how to obtain access through other routes.


PPIS is directing students to the online version of their reading lists to ensure students can access the most current and accurate version. 


READING LIST
For each and every week, you are expected to read at least one of the texts. If no page numbers are indicated for books, please apply your own common sense what might be worthwhile reading from the books so you will be able to contribute to the conversation. I defer to your judgment as to how much you wish to read from these books. I have put only significant and important books in the field.

1. Understanding the Middle East and the Arab-Israeli Conflict
Essential

Pre-State Israel: The Sykes-Picot Agreement (1916), https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/sykes_pico.html


Pre-State Israel: The Hussein-McMahon Correspondence (July 15 - August 1916), https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/hussmac1.html
Caplan, Neil, The Israel-Palestine conflict: contested histories (Chichester, U.K.:  Wiley-Blackwell,   2010), pp. 41-55.
Hourani, Albert, Philip Khoury, and Mary C. Wilson (eds) The Modern Middle East, 2nd edition (London: I.B. Tauris & Co Ltd, 2004), chap. 4.

Shapira, Anita, Israel: A History (The Schusterman Series in Israel Studies) (2012), chapters 1,2.




Recommended

Goldschmidt, Arthur, A Concise History of the Middle East (Boulder: Westview, 2006), chap. 3


Lesch, David W., The Arab –Israeli Conflict A History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008), chap. 4
Gelvin, James, The Israel-Palestine Conflict: One Hundred Years of War [Paperback] (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2013), chap. 3, http://www.amazon.com/Israel-Palestine-Conflict-One-Hundred-Years/dp/110761354X/ref=sr_1_13?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1380394352&sr=1-13&keywords=israel+palestine+conflict

Background

Stein, Leonard, The Balfour Declaration (London: Vallentine-Mitchell, 1961), Part 1, chaps. 1-3, “The Background 1839-1914”, pp. 3-94.



2. The Rise of Zionism and Arab Nationalism
Essential

Destani, B. (ed.), The Zionist Movement and the Foundation of Israel 1839-1972 (Cambridge:   Cambridge University Press, 2013), chap. 2.
Lewis, Bernard, The Shaping of the Modern Middle East (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994), chap. 4.
Gilbert, Martin, Israel: A History (NY: Harpercollins, 2008), pp. 16-35, http://www.amazon.com/Israel-History-Martin-Gilbert/dp/0688123635/ref=sr_1_28?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1380393407&sr=1-28&keywords=Peres%2C+Shimon

Recommended

Shapira, Anita, Israel: A History (The Schusterman Series in Israel Studies) (2012), pp. 67-102.




Background

Ben-Gurion, David, Rebirth and Destiny of Israel (London: Thomas Yoseloff, 1959), chap. 5.



3. World War I and Its Aftermath - Conflicting Promises: The Hussein-McMahon Correspondence, The Sykes-Picot Treaty, The Balfour Declaration 
Essential

Gilbert, Martin, Israel: A History (NY: Harpercollins, 2008), http://www.amazon.com/Israel-History-Martin-Gilbert/dp/0688123635/ref=sr_1_28?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1380393407&sr=1-28&keywords=Peres%2C+Shimon
Morris, Benny, Righteous Victims: A History of the Zionist-Arab Conflict, 1881-2001 (NY: Vintage, 2001), pp. 37-66.
Sayigh, Yezid, “Introduction”, in Armed Struggle and the Search for State: The Palestinian National Movement 1949-1993 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 1-23.

Recommended

Shindler, Colin, A History of Modern Israel (Cambridge:   Cambridge University Press, 2013), pp. 10-37.




Background

Stein, Leonard, The Balfour Declaration (London: Vallentine-Mitchell, 1961), Chap. 16, “The Sykes-Picot Agreement”, pp. 240-269.


Stein, Leonard, The Balfour Declaration, Chap. 21, “The British invasion of Palestine”, pp. 327-338.

4. The Holocaust, World War II, The Israel War of Independence, and the Palestinian Naqba
Essential

Khalidi, Rashid, “The Palestinians and 1948: The underlying causes of failure”, in Rogan, Eugene and Avi Shlaim (eds.), The War for Palestine (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2007), pp.12-36.




Morris, Benny, The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Crisis Revisited (New York: Cambridge, 2004), chap. 2. [Paperback]




Morris, Benny, Israel's Border Wars, 1949-1956: Arab Infiltration, Israeli Retaliation, and the Countdown to the Suez War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), chap. 1.




Recommended

Morris, Benny, “Revisiting the Palestinian Exodus of 1948”, in Rogan, Eugene and Avi Shlaim (eds.), The War for Palestine, pp. 37-59.


Gilbert, Martin, Israel: A History (NY: Harpercollins, 2008), pp. 186-208.

Morris, Benny, 1948: A History of the First Arab-Israeli War (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009), pp. 273-319.

Caplan, Neil, The Israel-Palestine conflict: contested histories (Chichester, U.K.:  Wiley-Blackwell,   2010), pp. 101-130.



Background

Morris, Benny, Righteous Victims: A History of the Zionist-Arab Conflict, 1881-2001 (NY: Vintage, 2001)


Karsh, Efraim (ed.), Israel: The First Hundred Years (London: Routledge, 2002), Vols. 1, 2, 3.
Zertal, Idith, Israel’s Holocaust and the Politics of Nationhood (Cambridge:   Cambridge University Press, 2013), chap. 2.
Elpeleg, Zvi, The Grand Mufti: Haj Amin Al-Husseini (London: Frank Cass, 1993), chap. 5.


5. The 1956 Suez War and the Development of Palestinian Nationalism
Essential

Eden, Anthony, The Suez Crisis of 1956 (Boston, MA.: Beacon Press, 1968), chap. 4.


Bar-On, Mordechai, The Gates of Gaza: Israel's Road to Suez and Back, 1955-1957 (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994), chap. 5.

Gilbert, Martin, Israel: A History (NY: Harpercollins, 2008), pp. 320-328.




Recommended

Nutting, Anthony, No End of A Lesson: the story of Suez (London: Constable, 1957), chap. 6.




Smith, Simon C. (ed.), Reassessing Suez 1956 (Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing, 2008)


Tal, David (ed.), The 1956 War (London: Frank Cass, 2001), chap. 4.

Lahav, Pnina, “The Suez Crisis of 1956 and Its Aftermath: A Comparative Study of Constitutions, Use of Force, Diplomacy and International Relations”, Boston University Law Review, Vol. 95 (2015): 1297-1354.




Background

Dayan, Moshe, Diary of the Sinai Campaign (Cambridge, Mass.: Da Capo, 1991), chap. 6.
Kyle, Keith, Suez (London, 2003).


6. The 1967 Six Day War
Essential

Parker, Richard B., The Six-Day War: A Retrospective (Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1996), pp. 119-152.




Oren, Michael B., Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East (NY: Oxford University Press, 2002), pp. 61-169.

Laura M. James, “Egypt: Dangerous Illusions”, in Wm Roger Louis and Avi Shlaim (eds.), The 1967 Arab-Israel War (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp. 56-78.



Recommended

Quigley, John, The Six Day War and Israeli Self-Defense (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), chap. 6.

Avi Shlaim, “Israel: Poor Little Samson”, in Wm Roger Louis and Avi Shlaim (eds.), The 1967 Arab-Israel War (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp. 22-55.



Background

Bregman, Ahron, Israel’s Wars (London: Routledge, 2010), pp. 62-101.


Rami Ginat, “The Soviet Union: The Roots of War and a Reassessment of Historiography”, in Wm Roger Louis and Avi Shlaim (eds.), The 1967 Arab-Israel War (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp. 193-218.

7. The 1973 Yom Kippur War
Essential

Bar-Joseph, Uri, The Watchman Fell Asleep: the surprise of Yom Kippur and its sources (NY: State University of NY, 2005), pp. 235-252.
Kipnis, Yigal, 1973: The Road to War  (Just World Books, 2013), chap. 6.

Recommended

Sayigh, Yezid, “The State in Exile 1973-1982”, in Armed Struggle and the Search for State: The Palestinian National Movement 1949-1993 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999).


Bregman, Ahron, Israel’s Wars (London: Routledge, 2010), pp. 39-61.

Background

Gilbert, Martin, Israel: A History (NY: Harpercollins, 2008), pp. 426-461




8. The 1982 Lebanon War and the 1987 Palestinian Uprising (Intifada)
Essential

Schiff, Ze'ev, and Ehud YA'Ari, Israel's Lebanon War (NY: Simon and Schuster, 1984), chap. 2-5.

Cohen-Almagor, Raphael, “The Intifada: Causes, Consequences, and Future Trends”, Small Wars & Insurgencies, Vol. 2, No. 1 (1991): 12-40



Recommended

Gilbert, Martin, Israel: A History (NY: Harpercollins, 2008), pp. 525-542

Sayigh, Yezid, “Intifada to the Rescue”, in Armed Struggle and the Search for State: The Palestinian National Movement 1949-1993 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 607-637.



Background

Rigby, Andrew, Living the Intifada (London 1991), chap. 1-5.



9. From the 1993 Oslo Peace Accords, to 2000 Camp David and 2001 Taba
Essential

Abbas, Mahmoud, Through Secret Channels (London: Garnet Pub Ltd, 1997), pp. 111-142.



Agha, Hussein, Shai Feldman, Ahmad Khalidi and Zeev Schiff, Track-II Diplomacy: Lessons from the Middle East (Boston, Mass.:  The MIT Press, 2004), chap. 4.



Beilin, Yossi, The Path to Geneva (NY: RDV Books, 2004), pp. 212-226.
Ben-Ami, Shlomo, Scars of War, Wounds of Peace (London: Phoenix, 2005), pp. 240-284.
Kurtzer, Daniel C., The Peace Puzzle: America's Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace, 1989-2011 (Cornell University Press, in Collaboration with the United States Institute of Peace, 2013), pp. 105-153.


Qurie, Ahmed, Beyond Oslo (London: Tauris, 2008), chap. 8.




Recommended

Miller, Aaron David, The Much Too Promised Land: America's Elusive Search for Arab-Israeli Peace (NY: Bantam, 2008), chap. 6.

Bregman, Ahron, Elusive Peace (London: Penguin, 2005), pp. 85-121.


Enderlin, Charles, Shattered Dreams: The Failure of the Peace Process in the Middle East, 1995-2002 (NY: Other Press, 2003), chap. 7.
Indyk, Martin, Innocent Abroad (NY: Simon and Schuster, 2009), pp. 361-390.
Avidar, Eli, The Abyss (London: Rowman and Littlefield, 2015), pp. 13-46.

Background

Ashrawi, Hanan, This Side of Peace: A Personal Account (NY: Touchstone, 1996).


Kurtzer, Daniel C., Negotiating Arab-Israeli Peace: American Leadership in the Middle East (Washington, D.C.: United States Institute of Peace Press, 2008).
Cohen-Almagor, Raphael, “The Failed Peace Process in the Middle East 1993-2011”, Israel Affairs, Vol. 18, No. 4 (October 2012): 563-576
Golan, Galia, Israeli Peacemaking Since 1967 (London: Routledge, 2015).


Kurtzer, Daniel C., (ed.), Pathways to Peace: America and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)

Quandt, William, Peace Process: American Diplomacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 1967 (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2005)


Qurie, Ahmed, Negotiating Palestine: From the Second Intifada to Hamas' Electoral Victory (London:  I. B. Tauris, 2015)
Ross, Dennis, The Missing Peace (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004)
Rothstein, Robert L., Moshe Ma'oz and Khalil Shikaki (eds.), The Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process. Oslo and the Lessons of Failure: Perspectives, Predicaments and Prospects (Brighton, Portland: Sussex Academic Press, 2004) 
Savir, Uri, The Process (New York:  Vintage, 1999)

Sher, Gilead, The Israeli-Palestinian Peace Negotiations, 1999-2001: Within Reach (London: Routledge, 2006)

Cofman Wittes, Tamara (ed.), How Israelis and Palestinians Negotiate (Washington DC.: US Institute of Peace Press, 2005)


Swisher, Clayton E., The Truth About Camp David: The Untold Story About the Collapse of the Middle East Peace Process (NY: Nation Books, 2004).

10. The 2006 Israel-Hezbollah War and the Rise of Hamas to Power
Essential

Cohen-Almagor, Raphael, and Sharon Haleva-Amir,The Israel-Hezbollah War and the Winograd Committee”, Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law, Vol. II:1 (2008): 113-130


Lesch, David W., and Mark L. Haas, The Middle East and the United States: History, Politics, and Ideologies (Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 2013), chap. 13.
Hroub, Khaled, Hamas: Political Thought and Practice (Washington: Institute for Palestine Studies, 2002), pp. 11-251



Recommended

Mishal, Shaul and Avraham Sela, The Palestinian Hamas (New York 2000), pp. 13-26.




Background

Gleis, Joshua L.  Hezbollah and Hamas:   a comparative study (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press,   2012), pp. 35-60. 





Recommended

Roy, Sara, Hamas and Civil Society in Gaza: Engaging the Islamist Social Sector (Princeton, NJ.: Princeton University Press, 2011), pp. 19-50.

Qurie, Ahmed, Negotiating Palestine: From the Second Intifada to Hamas' Electoral Victory (London:  I. B. Tauris, 2015)



11. Looking Ahead: Prospects for “New Middle East”
Essential

Peres, Shimon, The New Middle East (New York: Henry Holt, 1993), pp. 155-194.


Cohen-Almagor, Raphael, “Two-State Solution – The Way Forward”, Annual Review of Law and Ethics, Vol. 20 (2012), pp. 381-395

Recommended

Bar-Tal, Daniel, and Izhak Schnell (eds.), The impacts of lasting occupation:   lessons from Israeli society (New York:  Oxford University Press, 2013), chap. 13. 



Background

Ben-Gurion, David, Rebirth and Destiny of Israel (London: Thomas Yoseloff, 1959)



Nusseibeh, Sari, Once Upon A Country:  a Palestinian life (London:  Halban,   2009)



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