Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw



Download 28 Kb.
Date conversion26.05.2016
Size28 Kb.


Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw


LINE #

SECTION OF TEXT

RHETORICAL STRATEGY

USEFUL QUOTES

EFFECT ON COUNCIL/ARGUMENT

2-3

“If you had seen what I have seen of heresy”

Personal testimony




Creates ethos so others will rely on his experience

Defer to his experience



5-16

Description of how heresy begins

Juxtaposition

Paradox


Hyperbole

Imagery



“gentle and pious girl”

“may be the founder of heresy that will wreck both Church and Empire”

“if not ruthlessly stamped out in time”

“putting on the garb of poverty



How Joan was once and is now alerts the jury to not be fooled by her and it gives them permission to punish her”

Creates a fear that she can harm the Church and must be dealt with accordingly



16-17

“I have seen this again and again”

Repetition

Personal testimony






Creates ethos so others will rely on his experience or defer to his experience

17-32

“Mark what I say…mercy of the Church in dealing with it.”

Simile

Imagery/allusion

Juxtaposition/paradox


“woman who puts on the dress of a man is like the man who…dresses like John the Baptist”

“like the man who throws off his fur gown and dresses like John the Baptist”

“seems innocent …but ends in monstrous horror of unnatural wickedness


People pretending to be someone they are not – look beyond appearances for the deceptive nature of heretics

John the Baptist followed a prophet some did not believe in so he was going against the church doctrine

Be wary of Joan’s deceptive appearance


32-37

“For two hundred years…the interpreters of god’s will.”

Personification

Deductive reasoning

Derogatory tone


“diabolical madnesses”

“for 2 hundred years the Holy Office has striven with these diabolical madnesses”

“vain and ignorant persons…taking it upon themselves to be the interpreters of God’s will”


Heresy takes on a life of its own the jury can fight against it by punishing Joan

Nothing new to the church, Inquisitor knows how to deal with it so the jury should trust his judgment

Church is only allowed to interpret God’s will so heretics have overstepped the boundaries


37-42

“You must not fall…against your natural compassion.”

Parallel structure

Juxtaposition

Alliteration

Repetition



“you must not fall into the common error” and “you must be on your guard against your natural compassion”

“believe their diabolical inspiration is divine”

“diabolical” lines 33, 40, 58

(madnesses 33, inspiration 40, pride 58)



Equality of how easy it is to think heretics are merely liars to not having compassion for them (both ideas forgive the jury for their natural kindness)

See past the façade

Draw emotions of jury – anti church and God word choice focused on all heretics and specifically Joan


42-44

“You are all, I hope, merciful men: how else could you have devoted your lives to the service of our gentle Savior?”

Rhetorical question

Flattering tone



“devoted your lives to the service of our gentle Savior”

“merciful men”,” devoted your lives “, “service of our gentle Savior”



Emotional appeal: have served God in the past, must serve God now

44-59

Description of Joan of Arc

Juxtaposition

Paradox


Alliteration

“devilish pride…has left no mark on her countenance”

“a diabolical pride and a natural humility seated side by side in the selfsame soul”

“seated side by side in the selfsame soul”


Must see past façade; there is evil within which should lead to conviction

Draws attention to the duality of Joan – inner and outer



59-64

“Therefore be on your guard…against her in our hearts.”

Hyperbole

“we should forfeit our own hope of diving mercy were there one grain of malice against her in our hearts”

“her punishment, if we condemn her will be so cruel that we should forfeit our own hope of divine mercy”



Connects council to each other on an emotional level; playing on the idea that they have no malice, but must convict – willing to sacrifice their own divine mercy if they have any malice toward Joan

Connects council to the Inquisitor also (first person plural)



64-68

“But if you hate cruelty…toleration of heresy.”

Repetition

Parallel structure



“if you hate cruelty” “I say if you hate cruelty remember that nothing is so cruel…as the toleration of heresy”

Appeals to their emotional state of not wanting to be cruel, but reminds them that it would be more cruel to tolerate heresy so they must convict

OVERALL

NOTES


What major strategies did you see throughout the piece?

General to specific deductive

________word choice or diction

Juxtaposition

Imagery

Repetition

Hyperbole

Simile


Analogy

Personal testimony

Rhetorical question

All three appeals tied to strategies

_____________tone

Parallel structure

Personification

Complex sentences

Periodic sentences

First person






The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page