Rowan university



Download 164.39 Kb.
Date conversion05.05.2016
Size164.39 Kb.


ROWAN UNIVERSITY

United States History to 1865

Course # 220515008-MW 1:45-3:00 PM – Library 126

Course # 220515004-MW 3:15-4:30 PM – Robinson 101A
SYLLABUS
FALL 2008

©2008 Dr. Lawrence J. DeVaro


History Department Phone: 856-256-4500 X 3990
E-mail: devaro@rowan.edu
Mary Beth Norton, et. al., A People and a Nation: A History of the United States, Vol. 1 to 1877, 7th Edition.
William B Wheeler and Susan Becker, Discovering the American Past: A Look at the Evidence, Vol. 1 to 1877, 6th or 5th Edition.
Thomas Slaughter, ed., Common Sense and Related Writings, Bedford/St. Martin’s, New York, 2001.
Elizabetth Ammons, ed., Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe, WW Norton, New York, 1st edition.

COURSE SCHEDULE


Day

Date

Lec.

Lecture (Unit) topic and Assignments


Monday

September 1, 2007




LABOR DAY

Wednesday

September 3, 2007

1

Course requirements, Jamestown & the Columbian Exchange

Monday

September 8, 2007




(Unit 1 continued)

Wednesday

September 10, 2007

2

Later Settlements: New England and the Middle Colonies

Wheeler, Chapter 2 discussion/essay due


Monday

September 15, 2007

3

Growth & Diversity in the 18th Century

Wednesday

September 17, 2007

4

The Coming of the American Revolution

Monday

September 22,2007




(Unit 4 continued); Declaration of Independence discussion/essay due

Wednesday

September 24, 2007

5

The American Revolution

Monday

September 29, 2007




(Unit 5 continued)

Paine’s Common Sense discussion/essay due

Wednesday

October 1, 2007



Quiz # 1; (Unit 5 continued)


Monday

October 6, 2007




Exam # 1

Wednesday

October 8, 2007

6

Republicanism and Federalism

Monday

October 13, 2007

7

Experimenting with Constitution Making;

Wednesday

October 15, 2007




(Unit 7 continued)

Monday

October 20, 2007

8

Development of Political Parties

Wednesday

October 22, 2007




(Unit 8 continued);

Monday

October 27, 2007

9

The Market Revolution

Wednesday

October 29, 2007




(Unit 9 continued); Wheeler, Chapter 7 discussion/essay due

Monday

November 3 2007

10

Jacksonian Democracy and the Rise of the Whig Party

Wednesday

November 5, 2007




Quiz # 2; (Unit 10 continued)

Monday

November 10, 2007




Exam # 2

Wednesday

November 12, 2007

11

Religious Revival and the Era of Reform

Monday

November 17, 2007




(Unit 11 continued); Wheeler, Chapter 8 discussion/essay due

Wednesday

November 19, 2007

12

Westward Expansion, Sectionalism and Slavery

Monday

November 24, 2007




(Unit 12 continued); Wheeler, Chapter 9 essay due (optional)

Wednesday

November 26, 2007

13

The Coming of the Civil War: the 1850s

Monday

December 1, 2007




(Unit 13 continued); Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin discussion/essay due

Wednesday

December 3, 2007

14

The Civil War

Monday

December 8, 2007




(Unit 14 continued)

Wednesday

December 10, 2007




(Unit 14 continued)

Finals Week:

December 15-19



FINAL EXAM (Exam # 3)



COURSE OVERVIEW
In this survey of United States History to 1865, the end of the Civil War, we will focus on four (4) dominant themes—the development of:

(1.) the American character (1607-1776)

(2.) an American republican form of government (1776-1815)

(3.) a market economy (and a market revolution) (1815-1865)



(4.) the institution of slavery, resistance, abolition, emancipation and civil rights (1619-1865)
Each theme was formative and integral to the public discourse, and remains so. I believe that we are better able to understand the United States in 2008 through comprehension and appreciation of each of these dominant themes. As we explore and deliberate each, you will formulate your own and interpretation based on the evidence.
While the four themes provide the construct for the course, we will specifically examine the development of American civilization to 1865 from political/constitutional, social, economic, intellectual and cultural perspectives, including such topics as Puritanism, revolution, republicanism, federalism, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, reform movements, nationalism, sectionalism, slavery, secession, minorities and women.

COURSE OUTLINE


1. JAMESTOWN SETTLEMENT AND THE COLUMBIAN EXCHANGE
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapters 1 and 2.
Questions:

  • What is meant by the Columbian Exchange? Ethnogenesis? Ethnocentrism?

  • How did contact and exchange occur among Amerindians, the English (European) settlers

and Africans?

  • Why was Jamestown settled by the English? What is the significance of the joint-stock company?

  • What were the consequences (affects) of contact and exchange in the English colony of

Jamestown?

  • How was power understood or shared in this tri-cultural relationship?

  • Why did indentured servitude and life-long slavery develop in Virginia colony?

  • What is the paradox of 1619?

  • How did the Columbian Exchange and Jamestown contribute to the development of an American character?



  1. Defining The Columbian Exchange


  2. First Encounters And Cultural Interaction: The Spanish And Portuguese

  3. Later Encounters: The Dutch, French, And English
  4. Jamestown Settlement: Tri-Cultural Interaction


  1. “America” And The “Amerindians”

  2. England, The English And Their Joint Stock Company

  3. Africa And The Forced Migration Of Africans

  4. The Paradox Of 1619 (consideration of Edmund Morgan’s American Slavery American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia)

  5. Virginia’s Transformation From A Society With Slaves To A Slave Society (a consideration of Ira Berlin’s Many Thousand Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America)


2. LATER ENGLISH PERMANENT SETTLEMENTS IN NORTH AMERICA
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapters 1 and 2; Wheeler, Chapter 2 (discussion/essay).
Questions:

  • What was the role of religion in the settlement of New England? What were some of the other reasons for the settlement of Massachusetts Bay colony?

  • What did the idea of covenant mean to the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay?

  • How does covenant help us to understand the unity of church and state in Massachusetts?

  • How did Virginia and Massachusetts Bay differ in their motives for colonization?

  • How did Puritan congregationalism and the town meeting contribute to the development of democracy?

  • What were proprietary ventures (colonies)? How did they differ from joint stock company settlements? What were the reasons and motivation for settlement of the proprietaries?

  • What distinguished the middle Atlantic colonies from New England and the southern colonies?

  • How did Puritanism as doctrine and ethos contribute to the development of an American character? How so the proprietary colonial societies?




  1. Puritanism And The Settlement Of “New England”

1. Plymouth Colony And Massachusetts Bay Colony

2. Puritanism And Congregationalism


3. The Town Meeting

4. Puritan Expansionism And The Amerindians

5. Puritans And Africans: A Society With Slaves (Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone)

B. Proprietary Ventures: Maryland, the Carolinas, the Middle Colonies and Georgia

C. The British Colonial System in the Seventeenth (17th) Century

1. Mercantilism

2. Regulating The Colonies: The Navigation Acts

3. The Machinery Of Regulation: The British Navy, Customs And

Vice-Admiralty Courts



4. Mercantilism In Theory And Practice


  1. GROWTH & DIVERSITY IN 18TH CENTURY BRITISH AMERICA, 1720-1763

Required Reading: Norton text, Chapter 4.


Questions:

  • What is meant by each of these terms of place and empire?

-localism

-provincialism

-regionalism

-colonial and metropolitan

-colonialism and imperialism


  • How and when did an American identity emerge in the 18th Century?

  • What were the causes and consequences of the Enlightenment and the Great Awakening in America? How were these movements similar and dissimilar?

  • How did the Enlightenment, the Great Awakening and immigration contribute to the development of an American consciousness or character?

  • How did Enlightenment ideas contribute to the development of American Revolutionary thought (ideology)?

  • How was slavery influenced by the Enlightenment and the Great Awakening?

  • What are the rights, values, beliefs that Americans think of in 2004 when they consider their national identity? In short, what is an American?




  1. Demographics: Population Growth and Ethnic Diversity

  2. Economic Growth and Development

  3. Ideas and their Impact on Colonial Culture

  1. The Enlightenment and John Locke

  2. The Great Awakening

4. IMPERIAL vs. PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY, 1754-1774; THE COMING OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 1763-1776


Required Reading: Norton, Chapter 5; The Declaration of Independence (Norton, Appendix A23; discussion/essay).
Questions:

  • How did the defeat of France in 1763 affect the relationship between the British-American colonies and Great Britain?

  • How did differing world views produce profound issues for colonies and mother country?

  • What were the issues and grievances that led to colonial resistance and finally to rebellion and independence?

  • What enduring, shared American beliefs resulted from these issues?

  • How did the concepts of republicanism and federalism spring from the imperial-provincial struggle of 1763-1775?

  • How is the Declaration of Independence an expression of Enlightenment thinking as well as a reflection of the imperial-provincial struggle of 1763-1775?




  1. Anglo-French Rivalry
  2. The Coming of the Revolution, 1763-1775


  1. Reorganization Of The New Empire, 1763-1770

  2. Grievances, Issues, and Resistance
    -
    Standing armies & quartering of troops in peacetime
    -Theories of representation
    -Theories of taxation: regulation vs. Revenue
    -
    Increased regulation
    -Vice admiralty courts
    -American board of customs commissioners & the king’s “placemen”
    -Colonial legislature's prerogatives

-The meaning of the English Constitution


3. Colonial Reaction and The Coming Of The Revolution, 1764-1774

5. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 1775-1783
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapter 6; Thomas Paine’s Common Sense; (discussion/essay).
Questions:

  • What is revolution and how revolutionary was America’s?

  • How did American public opinion divide among Patriots, Loyalists and fence sitters?

  • What were the conditions, forces, events and ideas that help explain American independence?

  • Did the Americans cut themselves a pretty good deal at the Paris Peace talks 1781-83?

  • Was George Washington really “first in the hearts of his countrymen”?

  • How did the American Revolution affect the institution of slavery?




  1. The Declaration Of Independence

  2. Defining Revolution

  3. Taking Sides: Patriots, Loyalists And Fence Sitters

  4. The Continental Congress and Republicanism

  5. The War For Independence And The American Revolution

  6. The Peace Of Paris

  7. The Impact and Meaning of the American Revolution


6. REPUBLIC, REPUBLICANISM AND FEDERALISM
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapter 7.
Questions:

  • What were the three variants (types) of republicanism as the revolutionary generation understood them?

  • What is the difference between republicanism and federalism and how are they interrelated?

  • Can republicanism’s enduring tensions ever be satisfactorily reconciled?




  1. Republican Antecedents

  2. Elements of Republicanism

  3. Lockean Individualism vs. Republican Community

  4. Virtue and the Republic

  5. Washington, Power and Virtue


7. EXPERIMENTING WITH CONSTITUTION MAKING: 1776-1788
Required Reading: Norton, Chapter 7; The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, Norton Appendix, A24; The Constitution of the United States, Norton Appendix, A27).
Questions:

  • How did the colonies transform their colonial charters into state constitutions in 1776?

  • How do the Articles of Confederation and the 1787 Constitution express different variants of federalism?

  • How and why did the American Revolution serve as the litmus test for “true” republicanism?

  • Why was the 1787 Constitution an experiment?

  • How was the “slavery debate” resolved in the 1787 Constitution? Was it satisfactorily reconciled with a republican form of government?

  • Why was the revolutionary generation preoccupied with power and virtue?

  • How did Americans render their revolution “user-friendly”? What happened to the right of revolution?




  1. State Constitutions

  2. Two National Models Of Republican Government Based On One Standard: The Revolution

  3. The Articles Of Confederation, 1781-1789

  4. Liberty Vs. Order: Shays’s Rebellion
  5. The Grand Convention at Philadelphia, 1787


  6. The Debate Over Ratification Of The Constitution Of 1787

  7. The Concepts Of Extended Republic And Federalism: Complementary Controls on Power

8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF POLITICAL PARTIES IN THE NEW REPUBLIC; TWO VISIONS OF REPUBLICAN GOVERNMENT


Required Reading: Norton text, Chapters 8 and 9; Wheeler, Chapter 5 (discussion).
Questions:

  • What did party mean to the revolutionary generation?

  • Why were parties thought to be incompatible with a republican form of government?

  • How and why did parties develop in the United States?

  • How did the post-revolutionary generation reconcile political parties with the Constitution?

  • How did the Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties represent two visions of republicanism?

  • What did Jeffersonians mean by the expansive sphere?

  • Why did Washington’s Farewell Address have such appeal through several generations of Americans?

  • What statement do the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions make about the compact?

  • Why is the Election of 1800 unprecedented and historic in world history?




  1. Vision I: The Age of Federalism: The Early American Republic, 1788-1800

  1. George Washington as Constitutional and Consensus Leader

  2. “Party” and “Faction” vs. Republican Consensus

a. Domestic Policy Stimulates Faction and Party Development

b. Foreign Policy Stimulates Faction and Party Development

c. The First Party System, 1792-1820

d. Washington’s Proclamation of Neutrality

e. Washington’s Farewell Address


  1. Presidential Elections of 1796, 1800, and the 12th Amendment (1804)

  2. John Adams and the “Disloyal” Opposition: Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions



  1. Vision II: The Age of Jeffersonian Democracy 1801-1809 [1825]

1. Thomas Jefferson as President, 1801-1809

a. The Peaceful Transfer Of Constitutional Power To Jefferson

b. “We Are All Republicans, We Are All Federalists”

c. Jeffersonian Democracy Contrasted With The Federalist Party

  1. French Louisiana And The “Expansive Sphere” – “The Empire for Liberty”

  2. An Assessment of the First Party System, 1791-1824

  1. Jeffersonian Democracy and James Madison

a. Keeping Washington’s Doctrine of Neutrality Alive

b. The War of 1812



c. War’s Significance and Consequences
9. THE MARKET REVOLUTION & THE MARKET ECONOMY, 1815-1846
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapter 10; Wheeler, Chapter 7 (discussion/essay).
Questions:

  • What is the difference between a pre-market and a market economy?

  • Why do market historians describe the emerging market economy as a market revolution?

  • What is the difference between market revolution and industrial revolution and how do they intersect? What is meant by an industrializing economy?

  • How does the market revolution recast the increasing differences between Northern and Southern Society in the first half of the 19th Century?

  • For market historians, how does the market revolution explain the coming of the Civil War?
    -How does the market revolution relate to each of the following: religious revivalism and the reform movement? Jacksonian Democracy and the 2nd Party system? Westward expansion? The expansion of slavery?



A.Defining The Market Revolution, (Charles Sellers, The Market Revolution, 1815-1846)


  1. Nationalism and its Variants

  1. Legal Nationalism: John Marshall And The Supreme Court

  2. Diplomatic Nationalism: John Quincy Adams And The Monroe Doctrine

  3. Economic Nationalism: Spokesman Henry Clary And The American System

  1. Sectionalism, Cotton, Slavery And The Missouri Compromise

  2. The Transportation Revolution And The Westward Movement

  3. Variants Of Industrializing America (Walter Licht, Industrializing America: The Nineteenth Century)

  4. The Factory System, The Lowell Experiment, And The Republic
    Boom And Bust Cycle Of The Market



10. JACKSONIAN DEMOCRATS; THE RISE OF THE WHIG PARTY, 1824-1840
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapter 11.
Questions:

  • How do market historians explain the coalition of Jackson Democrats and the coalition of Whigs in terms of the market revolution? Is there an “honest to goodness” party difference?

  • Was Andrew Jackson an accurate “symbol for an age”? Was he truly the champion of the common man?

  • What was the policy of Democrats and Whigs toward slavery and the Indian population?




  1. Impact Of The Market Revolution

  2. The Broadened Electorate And Third (3rd) Party Development

  3. John Quincy Adams And The National Republicans

  4. Jacksonian Democracy And Party Formation

  5. The Tariff And Nullification

  6. The Bank War And The Rise Of The Whig Party (Second Party System, 1832-1854)

  7. Panic And Depression

  8. “Tippacanoe And Tyler Too,” The Election Of 1840


11. RELIGIOUS REVIVAL AND THE ERA OF REFORM, 1800-1850
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapters 11 and 12; Wheeler, Chapter 8 (discussion/essay).
Questions:

  • What was the Second Great Awakening? What were its causes and consequences?

  • How did religious revivalism stimulate a massive era of reform?

  • What role did women play in religious revival and reform?

  • How did the market revolution contribute to revival and reform? How does it shed new light on the “burned over district”?




  1. Impact of the Market Revolution

  2. Religion and Revivalism: The Second Great Awakening

  3. Utopian Communities and Communitarianism

  4. From Revival to Reform

  5. Survey of the breadth of reform

  6. Focus on Abolitionism and the Women’s Movement

  7. The Gag Rule, 1836-1844

  8. John C. Calhoun and The Positive Good Theory
    Ante-Bellum America

1. Imperialism And International Trade

  1. Immigration And Nativism

  2. The American Party

Questions:



  • What is meant by nativism and how was it stimulated in the United States in the first half of the 19th Century?

  • How did navitism express itself politically?

  • What is the connection between nativism and Protestantism? Has anyone seen The Gangs of New York?


12. WESTWARD EXPANSION, SECTIONALISM AND SLAVERY, 1836-1850
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapters 13 and 14; Wheeler, Chapter 9 (discussion/essay).
Questions:

  • What did ante-bellum Americans mean by manifest destiny and how did slavery become part of it?

  • What is the difference between free soilism and abolitionism?

  • To what extent was the contest for control of the west a dress rehearsal for the Civil War?

  • For market historians, how does the market revolution help explain westward expansion and slavery’s expansion?

  • How did the market revolution undercut the Jeffersonian “expansive sphere”?

  1. Impact Of The Market Revolution

  2. The “Dynamic West” and the Market
  3. “Manifest Destiny”


  4. Oregon Fever, Texas And James K. Polk

  5. The War With Mexico, 1846-1848

  6. The Election Of 1848 And “Popular Sovereignty”

13. THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR: THE 1850S
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapter 14; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; (discussion/essay)
Questions:

  • How did the “compromise” of 1787 begin to unravel with the Compromise of 1850?

  • Why was the American political system (the second party system of Democrats and Whigs) unable to hold the union together through the 1850s?

  • What was popular sovereignty and why did it prove unworkable in holding the union together?

  • How did free soilers and abolitionists differ? Did attitudes of race unite them?

  • Why was John Brown considered a villain in the South and a martyr in the North? Just who was this John Brown?



  1. The Paradox of The Slaveholding Republic (Don E. Fehrenbacher)

  2. California


  3. The Compromise Of 1850
  4. Impact Of The Fugitive Slave Act


  5. Uncle Tom’s Cabin (Harriet Beecher Stowe), 1852

  6. Kansas-Nebraska and “Bleeding Kansas”

  7. The New Republican Party (Third Party System, 1854-present)
  8. Dred Scott And The Supreme Court


  9. Harper’s Ferry And John Brown, The Ultimate Abolitionist
  10. Abraham Lincoln Of Illinois And The Election Of 1860




14. THE CIVIL WAR AND THE REPUBLIC
Required Reading: Norton text, Chapters 15 and 16; Wheeler, Chapter 10 (discussion/essay).
Questions:

  • Why was Abraham Lincoln, a reasonable man, a moderate, free-soiler, unacceptable to Southerners?

  • What were the similarities and differences between the US Constitution and the Constitution of the Confederacy?

  • What were Lincoln’s views on secession, federal union, emancipation and race?




  1. The Civil War, 1861-1865

  1. The Republican Revolution (Don E. Fehrenbacher, The Slaveholding Republic)

  2. Historical Significance of South Carolina & State Supremacy, 1787-2000

  3. Preparations For War, North And South

  4. The Union And The Confederate Nation Contrasted

  5. Preserving The Union vs. Emancipation

  6. European Participation In The War

  7. Winning The War And Emancipation

  8. Revisiting the Paradox of 1619

IDENTIFICATIONS
(Source: Mary Beth Norton et. al. A People and a Nation: Volume I to 1877 (7th Edition)
EXPLORATION, DISCOVERY, THE SETTLEMENTS


*Columbian Exchange

*Puritanism

*Joint Stock Company

*"Great Migration", 1630-1640

*Indentured Servants

*Half Way Covenant, 1657, 1662

*House of Burgesses, 1619

*Proprietary Ventures

*Mayflower Compact, 1620

*Bacon's Rebellion, 1676

*Seasoning Time, 1609-1611

*Atlantic Creoles



*Dominion of New England, 1684-1688

*Ethnogenesis




AMERICA IN THE BRITISH EMPIRE


*Mercantilism

The Declaratory Act, 1766

*The Navigation Acts, 1650-1696

*Townshend Acts, 1767

*The Great Awakening, 1730s-1740s

Non Importation

*The Enlightenment

*Vice Admiralty Courts

*Albany Congress, 1754

*Boston Massacre, 1770

*French and Indian War (Seven Year's War) 1754 1763

*Gaspee Affair, 1772

*Tea Act, 1773



*Revenue (Sugar) Act, 1764

*Boston Tea Party, 1773

*Stamp Act, 1765

Committees of Correspondence

*Stamp Act Congress, 1765

*Coercive (Intolerable) Act, 1774

*Sons of Liberty

*First Continental Congress, 1774


THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION


Second Continental Congress, 1775

*Franco American Alliance, 1778

*Tom Paine, Common Sense, 1776

Battle of Yorktown, 1781

Declaration of Independence, 1776

*Treaty of Paris, 1783

*Battle of Saratoga, 1777





THE FEDERALIST ERA: NATIONALISM TRIUMPHANT


Articles of Confederation, 1781

Hamilton's "Report on the Public Credit", 1791

*Northwest Ordinance of 1787

Washington's Declaration of Neutrality, 1793

* Annapolis Convention, 1786

*Whiskey Rebellion, 1794

* Shays’s Rebellion, 1786 1787

*Jay's Treaty, 1794

The Grand Convention, 1787

Washington's Farewell Address, 1796

Connecticut (Great) Compromise, 1787

XYZ Affair, 1798

*Bill of Rights, 1791

*Alien and Sedition Acts, 1798




*Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, 1798


JEFFERSONIAN DEMOCRACY


*Judiciary Act of 1801

The Burr Conspiracy, 1806

*Louisiana Purchase, 1803

Berlin and Milan Decrees, 1806 1807

*Marbury v. Madison, 1803

*The Embargo Act, 1807

Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1804 1806

HMS Leopard and USS Chesapeake, 1807


NATIONAL GROWING PAINS


Tecumseh and the Prophet

The Battle of New Orleans, 1815

The War of 1812

The Era of Good Feelings, 1817 1819

*The Treaty of Ghent, 1815

*The Transcontinental Treaty, 1819

*The Hartford Convention, 1814

*The Monroe Doctrine, 1823

The American System, 1820 1824

*S.C. Exposition and Protest, 1828

The Missouri Compromise, 1820 1821

Rush-Bagot Agreement, 1817




*Tariff of Abominations, 1828

Convention of 1818



TOWARD A NATIONAL ECONOMY


Eli Whitney, Cotton Gin, 1793

*McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819

Second Bank of the Unite States, 1816

*Gibbons v. Ogden, 1824

*American Colonization Society, 1817

*Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge, 1837


JACKSONIAN DEMOCRACY


Maysville Road Veto, 1830

Bank Recharter Bill Veto, 1832

*Nat Turner's Revolt, 1831

Compromise Tariff, 1833

*S. Carolina Ordinance of Nullification, 1832

*Force Act, 1832



*Specie Circular, 1836

Independent Treasury Act, 1840




THE MAKING OF MIDDLE CLASS AMERICA and

A DEMOCRATIC CULTURE


The Second Great Awakening

Abolitionism

*Romanticism

William Lloyd Garrison, The Liberator, 1831

*Utopian communities

*Frederick Douglass

*Charles Grandison Finney

*Mormonism and the Mormon Migration, 1847

Temperance

*Seneca Falls Convention, 1848


EXPANSION AND SLAVERY; THE SECTIONS GO THEIR WAYS


Republic of Texas

*Wilmot Proviso, 1846

*Webster Ashburton Treaty, 1842

Gold, 1848

Oregon Trail

*Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo, 1848

Texas Annexation, 1845

Manifest Destiny, 1845

War with Mexico, 1846 1847

Popular Sovereignty, (Lewis Cass)

Denmark Vesey, 1822 and Nat Turner, 1831

Ostend Manifesto, 1854


THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR


Republic of California

Bleeding Kansas, 1855

*Compromise of 1850

Brooks Sumner Incident, 1856

*Fugitive Slave Act, 1850

*Dred Scott v. Sanford, 1857

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1852

*Freeport Doctrine, 1858

*Kansas Nebraska Act, 1854

John Brown's Raid (Harper's Ferry), 1859

Republican Party, 1854

Crittenden Compromise, 1861


THE WAR TO SAVE THE UNION

and RECONSTRUCTION AND THE SOUTH


Fort Sumter, 1861

Lincoln's 10 Percent Plan, 1863

*Antietam, 1862

Wade Davis Bill, 1864

*Emancipation Proclamation, 1863

*14th Amendment, 1868

*13th Amendment, 1865

*15th Amendment, 1870

*Gettysburg, 1863





CRITICAL ANALYSIS PAPERS
1. Common Sense Essay
Your essay on Common Sense will have two sections: (1.) background information and (2.) discussion of the document, Common Sense. Although you will be focused on Common Sense, consider and incorporate the other primary source documents included in your Bedford series. “Questions for Consideration” in the back of the book can be helpful in organizing and formulating your thoughts.
Part I: Background Information on Common Sense:


  1. Discuss and analyze how Tom Paine’s childhood influenced the ideas that were embodied in his writing of Common Sense.

  2. Discuss Paine’s views on slavery and equality as compared to those of his contemporaries. (incorporate at least documents #1 and #2 in this discussion)


Part II: Discussion and Analysis of Common Sense:
Common Sense is renowned as a propaganda piece. Discuss and analyze Paine’s primary purpose in writing Common Sense. What did he wish to accomplish? How persuasive was he? Discuss specifically his development of the concepts of monarchy and republicanism.
Having read and reflected upon the document, how successful do you believe Paine was in accomplishing his primary purpose?
Provide direct quotes (rather than paraphrasing) to support your argument. Also, be sure to refer to the syllabus for format and primary source requirements.
2. Uncle Tom’s Cabin Essay
Like Paine’s Common Sense, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin was highly persuasive literature that presented the American reader with a fundamental challenge. Reading the book and remaining neutral was not an option.
Imagine yourself as (a.) a northern man or woman or (b.) southern man or woman. You have been presented with a gift from a friend or relative, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, by this Harriet Beecher Stowe. Who is this woman? Everyone is talking about this book that confronts the “slavery question”. This is Romantic America and Mrs. Stowe’s book “…is intended to evoke tears.” (Ammons, viii). It is also Christian, evangelical revivalist America, and patriarchal America. [Use the Norton text for context; paraphrase the text if you wish, but do not quote the text book].

Assignment:
Read (1.) Uncle Tom’s Cabin and (2.) contemporary reviews of the book (Ammons, 459-483).
Write your own contemporary (from the perspective of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s world of the1850s) review of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. (1.) Be sure to identify yourself as a northern man, northern woman, southern man or southern woman. (2.) Did the book change your position on the institution of slavery or whether it should be abolished, or did it reinforce your position? (3.) Having read the book and written your own review, how did you react to the other contemporary reviews of your fellow Americans?
Use the strongest quotations that you can muster to support your position.

DISCUSSION TOPICS FOR ESSAYS
William Wheeler and Susan Becker (eds.) Discovering the American Past: A Look at the Evidence, 5th Edition.
Chapter 2: The Threat of Anne Hutchinson (REQUIRED ESSAY)
Why was Anne Hutchinson such a threat to Massachusetts Bay Colony?
Declaration of Independence: (REQUIRED ESSAY; use appendix of your Norton text)
Discuss the Declaration of Independence as a document of “The Enlightenment.” In other words, what examples from the Declaration reflect Enlightenment thinking and Enlightenment principles? Because the Declaration is your only primary source, footnotes are not required. The use of the Norton tertiary discussion of the Declaration is not acceptable. You are required to read only the primary source, which is the Declaration of Independence.
Chapter 5: The First American Party System: The Philadelphia Congressional Election of 1794 (Extra credit essay)
How was John Swanwick able to defeat his entrenched opponent, Thomas Fitzsimons for a seat in Congress in the 1794 election?
Chapter 7: Away from Home: The working Girls of Lowell (REQUIRED ESSAY)
How effective was the “Lowell System” in reconciling the old order (life before 1815) and the new order (the post war years and the Market Revolution)?
Chapter 8: The “Peculiar Institution”: Slaves Tell Their Own Story (REQUIRED ESSAY)
How did the slaves themselves view the institution of slavery?
Chapter 9: The Diplomacy, Politics, and Intrigue of “Manifest Destiny”: The Annexation of Texas (REQUIRED ESSAY)
How real were the conspiratorial views of (1.) an alleged British plot and (2.) of American expansionists’ alleged scheme to make people believe there was a British antislavery conspiracy?


Required Texts:

Please note that items C. and D. must be the editions noted; no substitutes will suffice.



  1. Mary Beth Norton, et al., A People and a Nation, Vol. 1 to 1877, (7th Edition)

  2. William B. Wheeler and Susan D. Becker (eds.), Discovering the American Past: A Look at the Evidence, Volume I: to 1877, ( 5th Edition)

  3. Thomas Paine, Common Sense: And Related Writings, Bedford Series in History and Culture, Thomas P. Slaughter, ed.

  4. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Elizabeth Ammons, ed., (Norton Critical Edition)

  5. The Declaration of Independence (Norton text)

  6. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union (Norton text)

  7. The Constitution of the United States (Norton text)


Course Requirements:
A. Attendance
Your attendance is required and essential if you are to derive the full benefit of the course. Attendance is also a measure of your interest in and commitment to the course. Therefore attendance will be taken before each class. "In attendance" means remaining for the entire class. Students are responsible for all material covered regardless of an absence. Four (4) absences will be excused, which means that no explanation is required. Students who miss more than four (4) classes should seriously consider withdrawing from the course. No make up examinations will be permitted without a signed note by a physician indicating that absence from class was due to illness.
Audio (tape) recorders, cell phones and all other electronic devices are NOT permitted in the classroom.

B. Examinations.


The course is divided into three five week segments each of which will be followed by an examination on the material covered. All examinations will be essay and identification (brief essay) drawn from class lectures, discussion, and class texts.
Essay questions will test your understanding and grasp of the broad sweep of history, concepts and ideas, a grasp of change over time, historical trends, causes, consequences and significance of events and an ability to think and write critically. Although the primary focus of this course is not upon factual information, as in any discipline, one cannot make a reasoned case without data to support an argument. Therefore essays will be evaluated for clear, concise prose crafted in complete sentences, good organization, and sufficient factual information (names, dates, definitions and other facts), that supports your statements. Again, students will be expected to draw upon lectures, discussions, both texts, and other assigned readings, as well as independent study and sources.
A quiz is scheduled several days before the first and second examination. Quizzes provide an opportunity to prepare for the exam.
C. Formal Discussion Time
Assigned discussion topics and formal discussion are interspersed throughout the semester. Students are required to attend and participate in each of these class discussions. Assignments are mostly from the companion text (primary source book), Discovering the American Past: A Look at the Evidence, Volume I (5th Edition) although other documents are also assigned such as the Declaration of Independence.
Discussion Assignments from Wheeler text: You are required to write a brief essay (no more than two, double-spaced, typed pages, 12 font size, Times New Roman or Arial font style, totaling 500 words or less) on an assigned discussion question.
Discussion Assignments for Common Sense and Uncle Tom’s Cabin: These two critical essays discussed above should average 3-5 pages each, of no more than 1,250 words. The format requirements, as with the discussion assignments are double-spaced, typed pages, 12 font size, Times New Roman or Arial font style.
No late assignments will be accepted unless accompanied by a physician’s note. All essays are a requirement and are not optional. Failure to complete essay assignments will significantly and negatively impact your final grade for this course.
Guidelines for Use of Primary Sources as Evidence:



  • Use direct quotations only; do not paraphrase the evidence

  • Place quotations marks around the quotation.

  • Quotations should not exceed six (6) typed lines of text.

  • Include the page number in parentheses, where the source can be found, ex: (p. 42)

  • DO NOT USE OR QUOTE SECONDARY SOURCES AS EVIDENCE FOR
    THESE ASSIGNMENTS.

D. Plagiarism.


Whenever we use another person’s words or ideas as our own, we are being dishonest. It is unethical; it is also illegal. When we use another’s words, we enclose them with quotation marks (“ ”) and we refer to this as a direct quotation. Paraphrasing is the summarizing (in our own words) of another person’s words or ideas. Whether we use direct quotations or paraphrasing, we must cite the author of those words or ideas. If we do not acknowledge another’s work we commit plagiarism, which is theft, whether intentional or unintentional. Anyone who submits plagiarized work in this class will receive a grade of F for the course. If you have any questions or concerns about proper citation or acknowledgement of another’s work, please ask me.
E. Policy on Extra Credit. Extra credit assignments are not an option.

F. Scholarly historical websites


1. General History and gateways to historical web sites:

    • General gateways to historical Web sites: http://www.ucr.edu/h-gig/

    • University of Kansas History Resources: http://ukans.edu/history/VL/

    • Yahoo: http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Humanities/History/U_S_History

    • Oklahoma Law Center, US Historical Documents: http://www.law.ou.edu/ushist.html

    • The National Archives and Records Administration: http://www.nara.gov

    • California State U, Long Branch, American Indian Studies: http://www.csulb.edu/projects/ais/

    • Library of Congress, American Memory: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amhome.html

    • http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu

2. History Web Sites from the Age of Discovery through Reconstruction:




  • Jamestown settlement and Virginia, Virtual Jamestown (Virginia Commonwealth Department of History): http://www.iath.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/

  • Plymouth colony, Walking Tour of Plymouth Plantation, (University of Connecticut):

  • http://archnet.uconn.edu/topical/historic/plimoth/plimoth.html

  • African-American Mosaic: A Library of Congress Resource Guide for the Study of Black History and Culture: http://lcweb.loc.gov/exhibits/african/intro.html

  • American Slave Narratives: An On-Line Anthology: http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/wpa/wpahome.html

  • American South and African-American (University of North Carolina): http://docsouth.unc.edu/

  • Black Studies (UC Santa Barbara Library): http://www.library.ucsb.edu/subj/black.html

  • The Avalon Project: Relations Between the United States and Native Americans, Yale Law School Avalon Project: http//www.yale.edu/lawweb/Avalon/natamer.htm

  • Iroquois Oral Traditions, (American Indian Heritage Foundation): http://www.indians/org/welker/iroqoral.htm

  • The American Revolution, (National Endowment for the Humanities):

  • http://revolution.h-net.msu.edu/intro.html

  • Documents from the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, 1774-1789, (Library of Congress): http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/bdsds/bdsdhome.html

  • The Making of America, (University of Michigan): http://www.umdl.umich.edu/moa/

  • “Oregon Fever”, “Across the Plains in 1844,” (PBS): http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/resources/archives/two/sager1.htm

  • Mid-Nineteenth Century Middle Class, Godey’s Lady Book (University of Rochester): http://www.history.rochester.edu/godeys/

  • The Civil War, Jim Janke (Dakota State University): http://www.homepages.dsu.edu/jankej/civilwar/civilwar.htm

G. Office Hours


I will be available by appointment on Wednesdays, 3:00-4:00; other options include: e-mail , devaro@rowan.edu and History dept. phone, 856-256-4500 X 3990.

F. Grades




A

90-100 %

Superior

B

80-89 %

Good

C

70-79 %

Average

D

60-69 %

Passing

F

Below 60 %

Failure

I

Incomplete

Assigned only if the student has work to complete. Upon completion in succeeding semester, a letter grade will be given.

NC

No Credit

No credit

IN

Incomplete

Incomplete (must be removed before the end of the following academic year

W

Withdraw

Registrar’s Office


Course grade components:
First Exam 20 %

Second Exam 20 %

Third Exam (Final) 20 %

Quiz # 1 05 %

Quiz # 2 05 %

Discussion/essays 10 %

Critical Analysis Paper # 1 10 %

Critical Analysis Paper # 2 10 %



TOTAL 100%



The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page