Review of General Education Courses by the University Senate General Education Committee



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Five-Year Review of General Education Courses by the University Senate General Education Committee

The Bylaws of the NDSU University Senate indicate that “All courses approved by the committee shall be reviewed by the committee every five years. Recommendations on reviewed courses will be forwarded to the Senate for action.” (Section 11.3)

The five-year review of courses previously approved for General Education credit provides an opportunity to demonstrate that the information presented in the course has met or exceeded the expectations for each learning outcome that was identified in the previous application to the General Education Committee. Faculty responsible for each class may identify any two (or more) of the seven learning outcomes to apply for renewal as a General Education course.

At the discretion of the instructor(s), additional learning outcomes may be identified. However, evidence must be provided for each learning outcome and the outcomes must be assessed as part of the regular annual university assessment process. If more than two learning outcomes were identified in the previous application, outcomes may be dropped to maintain a minimum of two learning outcomes for each course.

If faculty responsible for each course wish to changethe outcomes identified for any course by adding a learning outcome not associated with the previous application, a new course application should be prepared rather than submitting materials for a five-year review.

Faculty responsible for teaching each course approved for General Education categories should refer to the Committee’s Web-site for information, forms, and examples.

Applications for five-year review should include:


  1. Fifteen copies of the completed review form for each course and include 15 copies of:

  2. A current course syllabus (only one example is needed for multiple-section courses)
    (If this course is also offered online or in Web-based format, please submit that syllabus and appropriate documentation.),

  3. A completed General Education Outcomes Rubric for each student learning outcome chosen, and

  4. A copy of one or more appropriate assignments, examination questions, and/ or projects for each student learning outcome selected. Portions of the example that pertain to individual outcomes should be clearly identified on the example and referenced in the completed rubric (Item #3).



Questions about the review process or completed five-year packets should be directed to Larry R. Peterson, Minard Hall, Room 412J (Larry.R.Peterson@ndsu.nodak.edu , 231-8824.) Materials may, at the discretion of the instructor(s), be provided for preliminary comment by the Chair of the General Education Committee and one or more members of the General Education Committee.
The current Web-site of the University Senate General Education Committee is:

http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndsu/deott/gened/index.shtml




Five-Year Review of General Education Courses

Instructions: This format is to be used to describe how the General Education student learning outcomes for individual courses have been accomplished during the previous five-year period. Application for approval for an additional five-year period is incorporated into this format unless the response to question “A”, below, is “No”.

Please provide 15 completed copies of this document and the following:

  • A current course syllabus (A syllabus from an example section is sufficient for multiple-section courses) (IF this course is also offered online or in a Web-based format, please submit that syllabus and appropriate documentation.),

  • A completed matrix for each student learning outcome chosen, and

  • Copies of one or more class assignments, test questions, or projects that address each student learning outcome selected. Portions of each example that address individual student learning outcomes should be clearly identified on the example and referenced in the completed rubric.




Information should only be provided for those outcomes being addressed. Outcomes NOT addressed (and these instructions) may be removed from this template to conserve space and provide an emphasis on the General Education learning objectives for the course under five-year review.

Rev. 11/18/2004



Department: English Course Prefix and Number: Engl 251

Course Title: British Literature I

Instructor(s): Aune, Brown

This form was completed by: Aune

Date: 6 December 2004


Campus phone #: __231.7176_____ E-mail: __m.aune@ndsu.nodak.edu____________

  1. Is this course intended to be continued to be offered as a General Education course?

Yes: _X_ No: _____

(If no, please delete the next three questions and progress to identifying how the General Education outcomes selected for this course were met during the previous five-year period.)




  1. Will any of the General Education outcomes previously identified for this course be deleted? Yes: _____ No: _X__

If so, please identify the learning outcome(s) to be deleted: _________________




  1. Which General Education learning outcomes will be continued? ___1, 3, 6______




  1. Will any General Education learning outcomes be added for this course?

Yes: _____ No: _X__
If General Education learning outcomes are to be added, this form must be accompanied by a “General Education New Course Template”.

Outcome #1: (Students will learn to)
Communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and formats.

What methods of evaluation have been used to determine if, and how effectively, this outcome has been met?

A typical class meeting consists of a lecture/discussion session where the instructor draws on the readings for that day, literary concepts, and the cultural contexts of those readings to ask both factual and synthesizing questions of the students. These discussions measure students’ knowledge of the day’s readings and their comprehension of literary concepts such as irony, metaphor, and genre. These concepts are introduced incrementally during early class meetings in order to build a common language for talking about the course readings. Cultural forces, such as the Reformation are similarly introduced and regularly invoked and reiterated.

Other class meetings combine lecture/discussion with small group guided discussion of smaller questions that culminate in brief reports to the class as a whole. These small group discussions allow students to utilize the cultural and literary concepts on their own and help reinforce a shared understanding of these concepts.

The quizzes test knowledge of discrete elements of the course readings and the cultural and literary concepts in a quick format.

The essay portions of the exams require students to synthesize concepts by asking them to address specific text or texts using those concepts. The texts may be drawn from the course readings or from material not covered in class.

The group timeline project emphasizes the cultural contexts of British Literature. The form allows students to see how concepts change (or do not change) over time. The group aspect of the project requires students to find means for working productively with their peers. The Peer Rating of Group Members and Group Member Evaluation Forms help students to take responsibility for their work and to avoid potential unequal divisions of work.

The miscellany project is also productive. It asks students to emulate the Renaissance practice of collecting texts based on personal interest. Students are required to explain to a potential reader his/her motives and interests in choosing particular texts.


What assignments, test questions, and/or projects included in the attachments (and

referenced in the rubric for Student Learning Outcome #1) have addressed this outcome?

The take-home essay component of the mid-term and final examinations (attachments D & E), the collaborative timeline project (attachment B) quizzes (attachment F) and the miscellany project (attachment C).
Outcome #3: (Students will learn to)
Comprehend the concepts and perspectives needed to function in national and
international societies.

What methods of evaluation have been used to determine if, and how effectively, this outcome has been met?

The subject matter of the course takes students through a lengthy span of time, roughly seven hundred years, through two distinct language changes (Old English to Middle English to Early Modern English via the great vowel shift), through the shift from a manuscript to a print culture, and from a European catholic form of Christianity to an English Protestant form.

Students learn to identify how these changes affect contemporary notions of literature, authorship, and literacy. Discussions often extend to include modern notions of these same issues. They also work to discover the ways in which the relationship between literature and culture is never one-way, but constantly circular and reiterative.


What assignments, test questions, and/or projects included in the attachments (and referenced in the rubric for Student Learning Outcome 3) have addressed this outcome?

The take-home essay component of the mid-term and final examinations (attachments D & E), the collaborative timeline project (attachment B) quizzes (attachment F) and the miscellany project (attachment C). The miscellany project in particular allows students to emulate Renaissance practices, but using modern media including the word processor and the webpage. This allows a close comparison of different means of publication and difference conceptions of authorship and editorship.


Outcome #6: (Students will learn to)
Communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and formats.

What methods of evaluation have been used to determine if, and how effectively, this outcome has been met?

This outcome is actively evaluated through class and small group discussion. The instructor poses questions that compare, contrast, and synthesize ideas introduced incrementally throughout the semester. The essay questions on the mid-term and final exams also evaluate this outcome. The timeline project also asks students to link literary events with other cultural events.
What assignments, test questions, and/or projects included in the attachments (and referenced in the rubric for Student Learning Outcome #6) have addressed this outcome?

The take-home essay component of the mid-term and final examinations (attachments D & E), the collaborative timeline project (attachment B) and the miscellany project (attachment C).


Preface for Rubrics for General Education Outcomes
"The rubrics for the General Education Outcomes are guidelines. They are neither all-inclusive, rigid rules, nor a scorecard. The Committee does not expect evidence for each possible aspect of an outcome listed in each rubric; however, evidence for some of the criteria will be needed. The Committee designed these rubrics to promote consistency in its evaluation of courses and to assist faculty who are submitting courses for review. They will be used by the Committee in its evaluation, and should be submitted by faculty as part of course packets.”


Revised 10/07/04

Outcome 1

General Education Outcome 1: Communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and modes, using a variety of communication skills.


In order for a course to meet General Education Outcome 1, student products should be substantial and should constitute at least 50% of the course grade. The course must require that students produce at least three pieces in two of the following three categories: writing, oral presentations, or visual communication. Students should receive structured feedback and at least one revision should be required.

Communicate effectively in a variety of contexts
The student has demonstrated the ability to communicate effectively








1. For a variety of purposes (to inform/ persuade/ evaluate, etc.)

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence:




2. With different kinds of audiences (peers, public, individuals, groups, etc.)

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: The Timeline Project (attachment B) requires students to prepare a collaborative project that is posted on-line for future classes and the general public.



3. In different kinds of communication forums (dialogues, committees, public speeches, various publications, electronic communication [email, web pages], etc.)

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: The Timeline Project (attachment B) requires student to produce a webpage for the internet. It also requires students to work collaboratively toward a common goal.



4. Using different kinds of formats (formal presentation, progress report, final report, news story, etc.)

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: The students are required to respond in whole class discussions, small group discussions. They also produce essays for the mid-term and final examinations. The Timeline project requires production of a webpage and the miscellany project is a largely open format. (attachment B and C)



5. Other. Please specify.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence:




Evidence= evidence from student activities in course; Revised 10/21/04; Expires 10/21/09;



Communicate effectively in a variety of modes

The student has demonstrated the ability to communicate effectively




1. Using oral communication

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: In-class full-group discussion and small group discussion, Timeline Project (attachment B)



2. Using written communication

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Essay components of mid-term and final examinations, Miscellany and Timeline Project (attachments B, C, D, E)



3. Using visual communication (charts, graphs, illustrations, etc.)

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Timeline Project and Miscellany project (attachments B, C)



4. Other. Please specify.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence:




Evidence= evidence from student activities in course; Revised 10/21/04; Expires 10/21/09;

Communicate effectively using a variety of skills

The student has demonstrated the ability to communicate effectively





1. Finding topics, arguments, and evidence appropriate for speech/written document/ situation

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: The analysis of British Literature, ability to participate productively in class discussions, ability to work productively on group projects. Mid-term and final examinations, timeline project, miscellany project (attachments B, C, D, E)



2. Organizing ideas in a coherent structure

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Mid-term and final examinations, in class discussions (attachments D, E)



3. Composing language effectively to convey meaning

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Mid-term and final examinations, in class discussions (attachments D, E)



4. Employing an appropriate university-level vocabulary

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Mid-term and final examinations, timeline and miscellany projects, in class discussions (attachments B, C, D, E)



5. Demonstrating the grammar, spelling, usage, mechanics, and structure of standard English

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Mid-term and final examinations, in class discussions (attachments D, E)



6. Presenting the text or speech effectively as finished product or performance

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Mid-term and final examinations, in class discussions (attachments D, E)



7. Other. Please specify.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence:


Evidence= evidence from student activities in course; Revised 10/21/04; Expires 10/21/09



;Outcome 3
Outcome 3: Comprehend the concepts and perspectives needed to function in national and international societies.

The student has demonstrated the ability to









1. Identify and explain multiple concepts and perspectives

(such as individualism, social stratification, monotheism, or racism) used to analyze aspects of national societies and international societies.



N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Discussions of gender, class and in particular, religion in terms of the development of English literature from the eleventh to the eighteenth centuries. Also included are discussions of authorship, textuality, and the impact of print technology.



2. Analyze aspects of national societies and international societies with multiple concepts and perspectives (such as social privilege, modernization, civic culture, or division of labor).

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Similar to above, in particular the tensions created by the Protestant reformation and the shift from feudal to early capitalist society.



3. Apply multiple concepts and perspectives (such as globalization, cost-benefit analysis, fundamentalism, or xenophobia) to understand a contemporary issue in national societies and international societies.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Examining issues of textual transmission, translation, authorship, editing, and the canon.



4. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of multiple concepts and perspectives (such as nationalism, cognitive dissonance, gender roles, or acculturation) employed to understand national societies and international societies.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Examining questions of religious, class, and gender difference as represented in English literature.



5. Describe the basic assumptions (such as economic individualism or social roles) and evidence (such as quantitative versus qualitative, or primary versus secondary) used by the discipline studied to understand national societies and international societies.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: The tension of the rise (or not) of subjectivity in the late medieval and early modern period, especially through discussions of authorship.



6. Understand how new knowledge is created (such as by surveys or archival research) and evaluated (such as multiple causation) by the discipline studied to understand national societies and international societies.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Seeking out evidence of the epistemological shifts of the late middle ages and early modern period as represented in imaginative literature and the tensions between manuscript and print cultures.



7. Other. Please specify.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence:


Evidence= evidence from student activities in course Revised 10/07/04; Expires 09/09/09


Outcome 6
Outcome 6: Integrate knowledge and ideas in a coherent and meaningful manner.

Integrate knowledge and ideas in a coherent manner.

The student has demonstrated the ability to









1. Identify and organize information relevant to a question or issue.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Full-class and small-group discussions, mid-term and final examinations, Miscellany and Timeline projects. (attachments B, C, D, E)




2. Synthesize information to address a question or issue from a variety of sources (such as personal observation, scholarly journals, monographs, electronic media).

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Timeline project, take-home portion of mid-term and final examinations. (attachments B, D, E)




3. Integrate a variety of perspectives and points of view to address a question or issue.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Miscellany and Timeline projects. (attachments B, C)





4. Other. Please specify.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence:



Evidence= evidence from student activities in course; Revised 10/21/04; Expires 10/21/09;
Integrate knowledge and ideas in a meaningful manner.

The student has demonstrated the ability to









1. Identify significant patterns

from information relevant to a question or issue.



N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: The mid-term and final examinations require students to demonstrate their ability to read texts critically and write critically about the texts. The patterns the course investigates include religion, print and manuscript culture, gender, and class.



2. Identify significant patterns

from the variety of points of view and perspectives relevant to a question or issue.



N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Students are exposed to writings from manuscript and print traditions, pre- and post- Reformation Christianity, and medieval and early modern time frames.



3. Evaluate the significance of various points of view and perspectives relevant to a question or issue.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: As with above, students learn to recognize specific rhetorical strategies, especially in poetry, that allow the poet to manage the reception of his or her work. That is, how a patronage poet might valorize his patron but at the same time elevate his own work.



4. Integrate information to gain new insights relevant to a question or issue.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: The student learns to respond to writings from various subject positions by identifying those positions and how the work of literature is affected by them.



5. Integrate perspectives and points of view to gain new insights relevant to a question or issue.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence: Reading patronage poetry not only as works glorifying a patron, but also establishing the poet as the producer of a commodity to be competed for.



6. Other. Please specify.

N/A No Somewhat Yes

Evidence:



Evidence= evidence from student activities in course; Revised 10/21/04; Expires 10/21/0

General Education 5 Year Course Assessment English 251: British Literature I

Review
Outcome 1: The ability to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and formats.

Methods of Evaluation

A typical class meeting consists of a lecture/discussion session where the instructor draws on the readings for that day, literary concepts, and the cultural contexts of those readings to ask both factual and synthesizing questions of the students. These discussions measure students’ knowledge of the day’s readings and their comprehension of literary concepts such as irony, metaphor, and genre. These concepts are introduced incrementally during early class meetings in order to build a common language for talking about the course readings. Cultural forces, such as the Reformation are similarly introduced and regularly invoked and reiterated.

Other class meetings combine lecture/discussion with small group guided discussion of smaller questions that culminate in brief reports to the class as a whole. These small group discussions allow students to utilize the cultural and literary concepts on their own and help reinforce a shared understanding of these concepts.

The quizzes test knowledge of discrete elements of the course readings and the cultural and literary concepts in a quick format.

The essay portions of the exams require students to synthesize concepts by asking them to address specific text or texts using those concepts. The texts may be drawn from the course readings or from material not covered in class.

The group timeline project emphasizes the cultural contexts of British Literature. The form allows students to see how concepts change (or don’t change) over time. The group aspect of the project requires students to find means for working productively with their peers. The Peer Rating of Group Members and Group Member Evaluation Forms help students to take responsibility for their work and to avoid potential unequal divisions of work.

The miscellany project is also productive. It asks students to emulate the Renaissance practice of collecting texts based on personal interest. Students are required to explain to a potential reader his/her motives and interests in choosing particular texts.
Assignments: The take-home essay component of the mid-term and final examinations (attachments D & E), the collaborative timeline project (attachment B) quizzes (attachment F) and the miscellany project (attachment C).

Outcome 3: Comprehend the concepts and perspectives needed to function in nation and international societies.

Methods of Evaluation

The subject matter of the course takes students through a lengthy span of time, roughly seven hundred years, through two distinct language changes (Old English to Middle English to Early Modern English via the great vowel shift), through the shift from a manuscript to a print culture, and from a European catholic form of Christianity to an English Protestant form.

Students learn to identify how these changes affect contemporary notions of literature, authorship, and literacy. Discussions often extend to include modern notions of these same issues. They also work to discover the ways in which the relationship between literature and culture is never one way, but constantly circular and reiterative.
Assignments: The take-home essay component of the mid-term and final examinations (attachments D & E), the collaborative timeline project (attachment B) quizzes (attachment F) and the miscellany project (attachment C). The miscellany project in particular allows students to emulate Renaissance practices, but using modern media including the word processor and the webpage. This allows a close comparison of different means of publication and difference conceptions of authorship and editorship.

Outcome 6: Integrate knowledge and ideas in a coherent and meaningful manner.
Methods of Evaluation

This outcome is actively evaluated through class and small group discussion. The instructor poses questions that compare, contrast, and synthesize ideas introduced incrementally throughout the semester. The essay questions on the mid-term and final exams also evaluate this outcome. The timeline project also asks students to link literary events with other cultural events.


Assignments: The take-home essay component of the mid-term and final examinations (attachments D & E), the collaborative timeline project (attachment B) and the miscellany project (attachment C).
Attachment A: Course Syllabus

“Literature in the Social Sphere”



English 251 British Literature I

Section 20745 Autumn 2004 (3 credits)
M. G. Aune Tuesday & Thursday 12.30 - 1.45

320D Minard Hall LADD 114

231-7176 Office Hours: 2-3.00 PM TTh

m.aune@ndsu.nodak.edu and by appointment

www.ndsu.edu/ndsu/maune and http://blackboard2.ndsu.nodak.edu
Objectives

This course is designed to introduce you to a great historical range of literature and writers in English, beginning roughly in the Anglo-Saxon eleventh century with Beowulf and concluding in the late seventeenth century with John Milton’s Paradise Lost. We will trouble ourselves in particular with the social contexts of writing in English through the six hundred years covered by this course.


Requirements and Methods

Because of the great range of writing covered by this course and the comparatively large number of students, the dominant mode of this course will be lecture/discussion. My lectures will be open in that I expect you to interrupt me with questions and comments. I also will pause regularly to address questions to you based on the day’s reading. We will engage in small group discussions as well. Thus your preparation for class must include a readiness to talk about the texts and ideas we are studying. I will occasionally introduce texts not assigned for homework. The specific work you are expected to complete includes a mid-term and a final exam, a miscellany project, a group project, and ten quizzes. Details of these assignments can be found below.


Grading Scale (Grade book available at Blackboard site)

Midterm exam 100 points A 100-90 %

10 Quizzes 100 points B 89-80 %

Final exam 100 points C 79-70 %

Timeline Project 100 points D 69-60 %

Miscellany Project 100 points

Total 500 points
Texts

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 7th Edition, Volume 1

A dictionary (bring to every class)


Students with Special Needs

Any students with disabilities or other special needs that need special accommodations in this course are asked to share these concerns with me as soon as possible.



Academic Honesty

I assume that all work you turn in for this course is yours, and any material that you have acquired from an outside source is documented properly. Failure to do so is considered plagiarism and will result in possible failure of the course. See NDSU University Senate Policy, Section 335: Code of Academic Responsibility and Conduct http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/policy/335.htm.


Late Papers

Late papers will lose ten points per day until they are turned in. You are responsible for turning in all work assigned in this class. Failure to do so will result in failing this class.


Attendance and Participation

Prompt and consistent attendance is an important part of this course. Not only are you responsible for material covered in class, you are responsible for actively participating in each class meeting. Coming late is disruptive to discussion and especially to group work. If something does happen you must contact me, via phone, answering machine or email within 24 hours. You are still responsible for what happened in a missed class.

Participation includes no only contributing to class discussion, it also covers prompt attendance, listening and responding constructively to your classmates, attending class prepared to discuss the readings, and bringing your books to every class meeting.
Paper Format

Unless otherwise noted, all assignments are to be type-written, double-spaced, with one-inch margins, in twelve-point Times font. Your name, the date, the class, my name and the assignment are to be at the top of the first page. Don’t forget to title your work. Any papers longer than one page must have page numbers and be stapled.


Quizzes

These will be unannounced, handed out at the beginning of the class period and collected after fifteen minutes. If you miss a quiz, you may not make it up. The questions will be short answer and based on the homework and lecture material.


Mid-term and Final Exams

These exams are designed to allow you to demonstrate your knowledge of the course subject matter and your ability to use the subject matter in a critical and analytical way. That is, I expect more than a simple repetition of course material. The take home essayes in particular are opportunities for you to demonstrate your analytical abilities. The mid-term exam will cover the material up to and including week eight. It will have three parts, a take-home essay due on the day of the exam, short answer, identification of quotes and excerpts. Expect material that has appeared on quizzes, ideas introduced in class lectures and discussions, and pay particular attention to any terms written on the board. The final exam will cover material from week nine until the end of the course. It will also include a take home portion, a short answer, and identification and cover material in the same way as above.


Calendar

Unless otherwise noted, all readings can be found in The Norton Anthology of English Literature, volume 1. While I have not noted it, I expect you to read the relevant introductions and section heads for each assignment.


Week 1 24 - 26 August

Introductions

Beowulf 1-835
Week 2 31 August - 2 September

Beowulf 2631-3180

“The Wanderer”
Week 3 7-9 September

Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue and the Miller’s Prologue

and Tale
Week 4 14-16 September

Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale


Week 5 21-23 September

Everyman


Week 6 28-30 September

Sir Thomas Wyatt, “Whoso List to Hunt,” “My lute, awake!,” “Mine own John Poins;“

Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, “The Soote Season,” “Love that Doth Reign,” “Wyatt

Resteth Here” Read through Songes and Sonettes (downloadable from website) and

complete questionnaire
Week 7 5 - 7 October

Sir Philip Sidney, Defense of Poesy, Astrophil and Stella 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, 108;

Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender
Week 8 12-14 October

Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender

Midterm Exam (Thursday)
Week 9 19-21 October

Christopher Marlow, Doctor Faustus


Week 10 26-28 October

Christopher Marlow, Doctor Faustus


Week 11 2 – 4 November

Ben Jonson, “To William Camden,” “On Lucy…,” “To Penshurst,”

“Song: To Celia,” “To the Memory of My Beloved…”

Read through Passionate Pilgrime and complete questionnaire.


Week 12 9 November (11 November, no class, Veterans’ Day)

John Donne, “The Flea,” “Song,” “The Bait”


Week 13 16-18 November

John Donne, “The Canonization,” “Air and Angels,”

“A Valediction: Of Weeping,” “Love’s Alchemy,” “A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy’s…,” “A

Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,” “Elegy 19,” “Holy Sonnet 14,” “Good Friday, 1613”

Timeline project due (Tuesday 16 November)
Week 14 23 November (25 November, no class, Thanksgiving)

Donne and George Herbert, “The Altar,” “Easter Wings,” “The Windows,”

“Affliction (1);”
Week 15 30 November – 2 December

Andrew Marvell, “To His Coy Mistress”

Henry Vaughan, “Regeneration,” “The World;” Richard Crashaw, “To the Infant Martyrs,” “I am the Door”
Week 16 7-9 December

John Milton, Paradise Lost Book 1 & Book 9

Miscellany due (9 December)
15 December Final Exam (8.00 am – 10.00 am)
Subject to Revision
Attachment B: Collaborative Timeline Project

Timeline Project

This will be a group project that will allow you to practice your collaborative and research abilities. The final product will be a timeline in webpage (html) form. You and your group are to choose one decade from 1066 CE to 1700 CE and collect as much material as you can about that time period. The focus will be on England, but you will also want to include continental and global events that affected English culture.

Items to include: who ruled England at the time, wars, economic system, science, technology, exploration & discovery, colonization, music, literature, architecture, visual art, famous people, philosophical trends.
The webpage must include at least thirty items and references for those items. The reference might be a book, an article or a webpage. If it is a book or article, give the bibliographic information. If it is a webpage, provide the title of the page and a link.
You will work in groups of three or four.
Group rules

In order for evaluation and grading to be consistent and reflect work done by individuals, a number of procedures must be followed. Ethical group participation means that each member is responsible for the group’s performance. Each member must contribute as well as encourage others to contribute.

During the first group meeting, the group must generate an agreement that describes the group’s goal. The goal will be to earn a high score on the project, but in a way that values the opinions of all members. Group members must be committed to the group’s goals, complete their individual tasks, avoid interpersonal conflict, encourage group participation, and keep the discussion focused. The group must compose a “Code of Ethics” that describes the goals and responsibilities of the group. This is to be no more than one page, it must list the group number, each member’s name and contact information (whatever means is most reliable), the group’s goal, and the responsibilities of members. Each group member and the instructor must receive a typed copy of this.

Each group must meet at least three times outside of class for each project.

On the day the group project is due, each group member must fill out and turn in a Group Member Evaluation Form for each member. Each member must also fill out and turn in a Peer Rating of Group Members. These forms are available for download from the course website.

The group will earn a single score for the project. This score will be modified by the peer response forms in order to determine each student’s score.



Attachment C: Miscellany Project

Poetical Miscellany Project

This project will allow you to interact with the course material in a productive and potentially creative manner. You will, in a real sense, emulate the practice of educated readers and writers in the early modern period by generating your own collection of literature that reflects your own personal ideas about what literature should be and should do.

We will spend some time talking about and examining poetical miscellanies in class. Briefly, a miscellany is a collection of poetry (and sometimes bits of prose) from a variety of different sources and poets. Miscellanies were very popular in Renaissance and Restoration England. For this project, you will collect thirty poems from the time period we will be covering (ca. 800 to 1688). The poems may come from our textbook or somewhere else. You must preface your miscellany with a letter to the reader, which will explain your rationale (a theme or focus) for the poems you chose. You must also have a title page and title, and a table of contents. You are required to hand in a hard copy and a copy on disk for posting on-line. (You may add answer poems or your own poetry, but these will be counted in addition to the primary thirty.)
Attachment D: Mid-term Examination Essay Questions
(25 of 100 points)

Choose one of the three questions below and answer it in a five hundred to seven hundred fifty-word essay. The essay should be typewritten, double-spaced in Times font, with one-inch margins on all four sides. Be sure to put your name, the date, the class and my name at the top of the first page.

You are welcome and encouraged to use your book and your class notes to write your essay. All quotes must be properly cited (author, title, page number or line number). You may not use any other outside sources. If you do, your score for this portion of the examination will be zero.
1. Sidney argues that poesy has “this end, to teach and delight.” Describe how the Second Shepherds’ Play does or does not fulfill this goal.
2. In the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, Chaucer carefully describes the pilgrims in order to establish their importance and social value. Compare the descriptions of the Knight, the Pardoner, or the Plowman with the Prioress, the Pardoner, or the Summoner (that is, choose one of the first three and one of the second). In what way do these descriptions serve to establish a standard of behavior?
3. Using examples from the material we read and discussed in class, compare and/or contrast Old English with Middle English.
Attach this sheet to your essay.
Don’t forget to bring a bluebook to the examination.

Attachment E: Final Examination Essay Questions
(25 of 100 points)

Choose one of the three questions below and answer it in a seven hundred fifty to one thousand-word essay. The essay should be typewritten, double-spaced in Times font, with one-inch margins on all four sides. Be sure to put your name, the date, the class and my name at the top of the first page.

You are welcome and encouraged to use your book and your class notes to write your essay. All quotes must be properly cited (author, title, page number or line number). You may not use any other outside sources. If you do, your score for this portion of the examination will be zero.
1. In his The Defense of Poesy, Sir Philip Sidney writes that “delightful teaching … is the end of poesy” (952). Choose one of the poems we read this semester, paraphrase* it and discuss it in terms of Sidney’s contention.

2. The pastoral mode of poetry predominates in the English Renaissance. Choose two poems by different poets that address the pastoral in different ways. Paraphrase* and interpret each poem so as to illuminate the contrasting notions of the pastoral.

3. Paraphrase* and then compare Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130 and Sidney’s sonnet 9 from Astrophil and Stella. What conventions do these poems share? In what ways do they contrast?
Attach this sheet to your essay.
* A paraphrase is a line by line re-writing of the poem in your own words. It is important to use your own words and not those of the original. You paraphrase will likely be longer than the original.

The in-class portion will be Monday 15 December, 7.30 am – 9.30 am in the regular classroom.


Part of the final exam will focus on one of these three poems: “Redemption” by George Herbert, “The Good Morrow” by John Donne, or “A Sonnet, to the Noble Lady, the Lady Mary Wroth” by Ben Jonson. A text will be provided, but you will be expected to answer detailed questions about it.
Do not forget to bring a bluebook.
Attachment F: Sample Quiz
1. What type of poem is “The Wanderer”?

2. Into what four periods is the development of the English language divided?

3. Give at least three characteristics of an epic poem.

4.”Then out of the night came the shadow stalker, stealthy and swift” What literary feature does this line demonstrate?


5. During the Middle Ages, what group was largely responsible for the production of books?

6. What is the Exeter Book?

7. What are oral formulaics?

8. Why does Beowulf want a barrow built for him?

9. How is Grendel’s origin explained in Beowulf?




10. What is a kenning?


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