Resource Sheet R2r- 8



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Resource Sheet R2R- 8:Educational materials developed through the Baltimore County History Labs Program, a partnership between Baltimore County Public Schools and the UMBC Center for History Education.

Evidence A: Sugar Act (April 5, 1764)

Breaking it Down: The colonies had, for many years, set up their own taxes to pay for militias and to run their own affairs. For the first time the British Parliament laid a direct tax on the colonists in the form of the Sugar Act in 1764. Through the enforcement of the Sugar Act the crown hoped to address smuggling of sugar into the colonies from the French West Indies and to increase revenue to help reduce the debt from the French and Indian War. In order to enforce the Sugar Act more customs officials were hired and British warships were put in place around colonial ports.

Sugar Act. http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2438. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University



June 29, 2010

Evidence B: Quartering Act (May 17, 1765)



Breaking it Down: In order for King George III to protect colonial interest British soldiers were sent to the colonies. These soldiers were charged with protecting against threats from remaining Frenchmen and Native Americans, enforcing the Proclamation Line of 1763 and other Parliamentary Acts. Providing room and board for British regulars was required by law and refusal to obey the Quartering Act resulted in criminal charges.

Quartering Act. http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2438. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University



June 29, 2010

Evidence C: Stamp Act of 1765


Breaking it Down: Prime Minister George Grenville had heard the complaints of the colonists about the Sugar Act. He decided to take a different approach with the Stamp Act of 1765. It was the first and only tax that the individual colonists had to pay themselves. This act impacted almost all of the colonists and Prime Minister Grenville felt it was fair because British citizens already paid taxes that were similar.







The stamps were not like the stamps used on mail today. These images were show stamps which were placed on documents to make them official and to prove that the tax had been paid on the paper.

Adapted from Call to Freedom, page 137.



The Stamp Act. http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2437. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University. June 29, 2010

The Stamp Act. http://americanrevwar.homestead.com/files/stamp.htm . The American Revolution homepage. June 30, 2010

Evidence D: Townshend Act (June 29, 1767)



Breaking it Down: By 1767, Colonists were unhappy with British taxation. Charles Townshend, the British Chancellor of the Exchequer (Treasury) agreed that internal taxes, like the Stamp act, could be considered illegal. To address colonial frustration Parliament passed the Townshend Acts. Townshend thought that no one could argue that the British government had the right to tax good imported to the colonies. The issue of smuggling on the part of the colonists was also a problem for Britain. The Townshend Act stretched the power of British soldiers stationed in the colonies to try and put an end to the smuggling.

Townshend Act. http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2438. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University



June 29, 2010



English soldiers search an American settler’s house (1770’s). http://www.uruknet.info/index.php?p=61993 . Military Resistance 8A5. June 30, 2010

Evidence E: The Tea Act of 1773
Breaking it Down: To ease tensions in the colonies, Parliament repealed taxes on imported goods, except tea from the East India Company. Tea was an extremely popular colonial drink and demand was high. But, many colonists were smuggling tea into the colonies in order to avoid the tax. The East India Company, a huge trading company based out of Britain, was in serious financial trouble. Parliament hoped they could help the East India Company by granting them a monopoly on tea sales in the colonies.


Adapted from Call to Freedom page 141

The Tea Act. http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2439. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University.

June 29, 2010

Evidence F: Coercive/Intolerable Acts:

Section A- Boston Port Act
Breaking it Down: The news about the Boston Tea Party quickly made its way to King George III and Britain. King George III realized that Britain was beginning to lose control of the thirteen colonies. He said, “We must master them or leave them to themselves.” Lord Oliver North, the prime minister of Britain, decided to punish Massachusetts by working with Parliament to pass the Coercive Acts in 1774. The Colonist referred to these acts as the Intolerable Acts. Included within these Acts was a reinforcement of the Quartering Act of 1765, which was a financial burden on the people of Boston.





Adapted from American Journey

Boston Port Act. http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2367. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University



June 29, 2010
Evidence F: Intolerable/Coercive Acts: Section B- Massachusetts Government Act and Administration of Justice Act
Breaking it Down: The news about the Boston Tea Party eventually made its way to Britain. King George III realized that Britain was beginning to lose control of the thirteen colonies. He said, “We must master them or leave them to themselves.” Lord Oliver North, the prime minister of Britain, decided to punish Massachusetts by working with Parliament to pass the Coercive Acts in 1774. The Colonist referred to these acts as the Intolerable Acts.




Evidence F: Intolerable/Coercive Acts: Section C-

Quebec Act
Breaking it Down: The Quebec Act impacted the British citizens (formerly French colonists) living in the province of Quebec. They were guaranteed the right to keep their Catholic faith. This Act also greatly extended the territory of Quebec into the land that had formerly been claimed by the original thirteen colonies.


Adapted from American Journey

Massachusets Government Act. http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2396. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University, June 29, 2010



Administration of Justice Act http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2358. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University. June 29, 2010

Quebec Act. http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=2417. Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University. June 30, 2010


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