Register Report First Generation



Download 6.97 Mb.
Page19/79
Date conversion15.02.2016
Size6.97 Mb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   79

Family of Nancy SHAWHAN (27) & George RUSH

114. George Ann RUSH (Nancy SHAWHAN5, John4, Daniel3, Daniel2, Darby1). George Ann was born in Shawhan, Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1840.51
Marriage Bond (original in the “Vault” annex of the Harrison County Court House, Harrison County, Kentucky):

The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be It Known, that we Harvey C. Ireland as principal, and John L. Shawhan as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of One Hundred Dollars.

The Condition of this bond is as follows:

That, whereas marriage is intended to be solomnized between the above bound Harvey C. Ireland and Miss George A. Rush

Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky, this 4th day of February, 1857.

Gent of age and consent of Shawhan in person} H. C. Ireland John Shawhan

Att. T. Wilson

-----


The following was found on the Livingston County, Missouri, Cemetery web site:

CD-17 Plainview Cemetery - This cemetery is located in Section 15, Township 59, Range 23 of Cream Ridge Township in Livingston County, Missouri. From Chillicothe eight miles North on 65 Hwy to Route K, East three miles to Chula, East 1/2 mile (West of railroad), North about 1/2 mile. Fenced and maintained. (Photographed Summer 1999)

Ireland, George A.

NOTE: This may be our George Ann Ireland. A Notary Public dated July 1884 places Harvey and George Ann in Livingston County, Missouri.--REF

-----

Livingston County Genealogical Society



c/o Livingston County Library

450 Locust St.

Chillicothe, Missouri 64601-2597

(816)646-0547


On February 4, 1857 George Ann married Harvey C. IRELAND110, son of John Jacob IRELAND (December 11, 1797-September 10, 1873) & Martha GLENN (about 1801-1835), in Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky. Harvey C. was born in Scott County, Kentucky, on December 31, 1834. Harvey C. died in Chillicothe, Livingston County, Missouri, on January 7, 1896; he was 61.
Judge Hervey Ireland.

Judge Ireland left Cynthiana in his youth; was judge of the Circuit Court in Missouri for one term. He has been elected more than once to represent his Democratic constituents in the house of representatives in Missouri.111

-----

Missouri Census, 1830-1870:



Ireland, H. C., Livingston County, MO, page 643, Mooresville Twp., Federal Population Schedule, MO 1870 Federal Census Index, MO30190254

Ireland, H. J., Livingston County, MO, page 630, Mooresville Twp., Federal Population Schedule, MO 1870 Federal Census Index, MO30190255

Ireland, Irvin, Livingston County, MO, page 623, Mooresville Twp., Federal Population Schedule, MO 1870 Federal Census Index, MO30190256

Ireland, James, Livingston County, MO, page 903, Mooresville Twp., Federal Population Schedule, MO 1870 Federal Census Index, MO30190257

Ireland, John J., Livingston County, MO, page 630, Mooresville Twp., Federal Population Schedule, MO 1870 Federal Census Index, MO30190260

Ireland, Thomas, Livingston County, MO, page 628, Mooresville Twp., Federal Population Schedule, MO 1870 Federal Census Index, MO30190266


They had one child:

i. Charles.



Family of Daniel SHAWHAN (28) & Minerva REDMON

115. Charles Redmon SHAWHAN (Daniel5, John4, Daniel3, Daniel2, Darby1). Charles Redmon was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on March 29, 1829. Charles Redmon died in Lone Jack, MO, on August 8, 1908; he was 79.
His obit mentioned that Charles had died at his home of heart trouble and general debility, having been sick for many months. It also stated that "Uncle Charlie" had been a resident of the Lone Jack, MO area since the spring of 1866, having been born in Bourbon County, KY. During the Civil War, Charles had enlisted under CSA Gen. Morgan; he was wounded near Burksville at the battle of Hartville, TN but participated in Morgan's raid thru KY, IN, and OH.
On December 2, 1851 Charles Redmon first married Sarah Ellen ROGERS, in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Sarah Ellen was born about 1830. Sarah Ellen died in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on February 22, 1853; she was 23.
They had one child:

i. Luellen M. Luellen M. was born in Kentucky on December 23, 1852. Luellen M. died in Kentucky on June 15, 1853; she was <1. Luellen M. was buried in John Shawhan Family Cemetery.


On January 24, 1854 Charles Redmon second married Ann Miller LAIL, daughter of John LAIL (November 28, 1802-November 23, 1841) & Burzilla BROWN (July 6, 1809-August 26, 1857), in Kentucky. Ann Miller was born in Harrison County, Kentucky, on December 19, 1835. Ann Miller died in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on June 29, 1865; she was 29. Ann Miller was buried in John Shawhan Family Cemetery.
Marriage Bond (original in the “Vault” annex of the Harrison County Court House, Harrison County, Kentucky):

Marriage Bond (#4662)

The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be It Known, that we Charles R. Shawhan as principal, and George Lail as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of One Hundred Dollars.

The Condition of this bond is as follows:

That, whereas marriage is intended to be solomnized between the above bound Charles R. Shawhan and Ann Lail

Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky, this 23rd day of January, 1854.

Charles R. Shawhan

George Lail


Jany 23 Charles R. Shawhan to Ann Lail} He of age and certificate of her guardian proven by Geo Lail one of the subscribing witnesses.
They had the following children:

i. Mollie. Mollie was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, about 1855.

288 ii. Sallie Ann (Sarah) (1858-1949)

iii. Alice. Alice was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, about 1859.

iv. Maggie. Maggie was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, about 1861.

289 v. Lutie Lail (1864-1942)

vi. Laura Lee. Laura Lee was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on September 29, 1864.

Regarding their 2nd twin you are calling Lollie Lail. Her real name is Laura Lee Shawhan Snodgrass. She married Oscar Snodgrass, the laborer hired by her father who is listed on the 1880 Lafayette County, Mo. census. The twins are listed as LL (Lutie Lail) & Laura Lee. They are also listed as Lutie Lail & Laura Lee in a Ky census. Laura Lee is my great grandmother. She & Oscar are buried in Tacoma WA.


Laura Lee married Oscar SNODGRASS.
About 1866 Charles Redmon third married Sarah Frances EASLEY, in Kentucky. Sarah Frances was born on July 4, 1837. Sarah Frances died on June 5, 1867; she was 29.
They had one child:

290 i. John Easley (1867-1957)


On February 9, 1868 Charles Redmon fourth married Lucy Ann WILLIAMS, in Kentucky. Lucy Ann was born about 1840.
They had one child:

i. Julia. Julia was born in Lone Jack, MO, on April 26, 1870. Julia died in Lone Jack, MO, on July 12, 1904; she was 34.

About 1892 Julia married J. S. PINNELL, in MO. J. S. was born about 1868.
116. William Winston SHAWHAN (Daniel5, John4, Daniel3, Daniel2, Darby1). William Winston was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on December 10, 1832. William Winston died in Lone Jack, Missouri, on August 21, 1905; he was 72. William Winston was buried in Lone Jack Cemetery, Lone Jack, Missouri.
The True Kentuckian

June 25, 1867


In Cincinnati, William Shawhan of Shawhan’s Station to Eliza Lloyd of Lair’s Station.
On December 25, 1855 William Winston first married Julia RAVENSCRAFT, daughter of RAVENSCRAFT & Mary “Patsy” (January 30, 1803-November 15, 1890).112 Julia was born on November 9, 1835. Julia died on June 27, 1868; she was 32. Julia was buried in John Shawhan Family Cemetery.7
Named also “Eliza A. Ravencroft.”
They had the following children:

291 i. Daniel Duncan (1856-1929)

292 ii. William Elken (1858-1938)

iii. Martha Bell. Martha Bell was born in Shawhan Station, Kentucky, on July 6, 1860. Martha Bell died in Lee's Summit, Missouri, on April 22, 1934; she was 73.

Research: "Since 1868 She Had Lived in Jackson County."

Mrs. Mattie Shawhan Cave, 74 years old, Lee's Summit, Mo., died yesterday at her home. She was born in Shawhan Station, Ky., and had lived in Jackson County since 1868.

She is survived by her husband, William Cave, of the home; a brother, William E. Shawhan, Shawhan Station; five half-brothers, Charles Shawhan, 1825 Jefferson street; George Shawhan, Holden, Mo.; Joseph Shawhan, Leavenworth, Kansas; Jake Shawhan, Lone Jack, Mo.; and Hope Shawhan, Tulsa, Ok., and three half-sisters, Mrs. Minnie Taggert and Mrs. Maggie Dickerson, both of Lee's Summit, and Mrs. Claude Lee, 2509 Forty-sixth avenue, Kansas City, Kansas. Funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock at the First Christian church, Lee's Summit; burial at Lee's Summit.113
On February 12, 1890 Martha Bell married William CAVE, son of John S. CAVE (circa 1810-September 6, 1863) & Nancy HUNTER (June 6, 1819-December 15, 1905). William was born in Dover, Lafayette County, Missouri, on November 6, 1863. William died in 1946; he was 82.
1. Robert1 Cave Sr.(1) was born about 1700. Robert died about 1755 in Culpeper Co, VA.

He married Mary ? wife of Robert Cave Sr in VA. Robert is of record over a period of about 30 years (1727-1755) in the Virginia counties of Spotsylvania, Orange and Culpeper.

Robert Cave Sr. and Mary ? wife of Robert Cave Sr had the following children:

2 i. Robert2 Cave Jr.. He married Eavis (Enous) ?.

3 ii. John Cave.

+ 4 iii. William Cave Sr. was born about 1738.

4. William2 Cave Sr. (Robert1)(2) was born in Orange Co, VA about 1738. William died 1828 in Green Co, KY, at 90 years of age.

He married Jeriah Davis in VA, about 1761. Jeriah was born in VA about 1740. Jeriah died after 1830 in Green Co, KY.

William's will was probated in Green Co, KY, April 21, 1828.

William Cave Sr. and Jeriah Davis had the following children:

5 i. William3 Cave Jr. was born in Orange Co, VA.(3) William died before 1850 in Green Co, VA.(4) He married Sarah Snow in Orange Co, VA, July 13, 1810. Sarah was born in Orange Co, VA.

6 ii. Pemberton Cave(5) was born in Orange Co, VA.

7 iii. David Cave was born in Orange Co, VA.

8 iv. Belfield Cave was born in Orange Co, VA.

9 v. James Cave was born in Orange Co, VA. He married Rebecca Harding in Green Co, KY, September 30, 1812. Rebecca was born about 1790.

+ 10 vi. John Cave was born about 1764.

+ 11 vii. Bartlett Cave was born about 1770.

12 viii. Anna Cave was born in Orange Co, VA 1775. Anna died in Hart Co, KY.

+ 13 ix. Thomas Cave was born about 1777.

+ 14 x. Abner Cave Sr. was born about 1785.

+ 15 xi. Mary (Polly) Cave was born March 27, 1788.

11. Bartlett3 Cave (William2, Robert1)(8) reference BARTFMLY was born in VA about 1770. Bartlett died before 1850 in Lone Jack, Jackson Co, MO.

He married Jinny Snow in Orange Co, VA, December 22, 1796. Jinny was born in VA before 1775. Jinny died before 1840 in NC or MO.

Bartlett Cave and Jinny Snow had the following children:

+ 22 i. Galen4 Cave was born October 15, 1800.

+ 23 ii. Algius (Gaius) Cave was born October 15, 1800.

+ 24 iii. Allie Elizabeth Cave was born about 1805.

+ 25 iv. John S. Cave was born about 1810.

+ 26 v. Charlotte (Lottie) Cave was born October 6, 1818.

27 vi. Polly Cave was born in Surry Co, NC about 1820. Polly died before 1836 in Surry Co, NC.

25. John S.4 Cave (Bartlett3, William2, Robert1) was born in VA about 1810. John died September 6, 1863 in Jackson Co, MO, at 53 years of age.

He married Nancy Hunter in NC, September 6, 1836. Nancy was born in NC about 1818. Nancy died December 15, 1905 in Warrensburg, MO, at 87 years of age.

John S. Cave and Nancy Hunter had the following children:

92 i. Elizabeth5 Cave was born in MO August 31, 1837. She married Jacob Bennett October 4, 1857. Jacob was born in OH May 12, 1833. Jacob died 1912 in Lone Jack, Jackson Co, MO, at 79 years of age.

93 ii. Mary Cave was born in MO about 1840.

+ 94 iii. Algius Cave was born about 1843.

95 iv. Susan F. Cave was born in MO about 1845.

96 v. Alley E. Cave was born in MO 1848.

97 vi. Matilda Ann Cave was born in MO November 23, 1850. She married Joseph K. Reid. Joseph was born about 1850.

98 vii. Berilda T. Cave was born in MO 1856.

99 viii. John B.(Bart) Cave was born in MO 1859. He married ? wife of John B. Cave about 1880. ? was born about 1860.

100 ix. William Cave was born in MO November 6, 1863. He married Mattie Shawhan about 1885. Mattie was born about 1865.

293 iv. John Morgan (1863-1910)

v. Julia Lee. Julia Lee was born on March 8, 1866. Julia Lee died on August 2, 1866; she was <1. Julia Lee was buried in John Shawhan Family Cemetery.7


In June 1867 William Winston second married Eliza Ann LLOYD, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Eliza Ann was born on August 31, 1844. Eliza Ann died on December 14, 1904; she was 60. Eliza Ann was buried in Lone Jack Cemetery, Lone Jack, Missouri.
They had the following children:

i. Charles Thomas. Charles Thomas was born on August 18, 1868. Charles Thomas died on February 25, 1935; he was 66.

Charles Thomas first married Mamie CURTIS. Mamie died on January 25, 1909.

Charles Thomas second married Elizabeth BACKUS.

ii. George Edwin. George Edwin was born on January 10, 1870. George Edwin died on February 2, 1951; he was 81.

On December 9, 1895 George Edwin first married Luella CRAWFORD. Luella was born in Chapel Hill, Lafayette County, Missouri. Luella died on January 15, 1924.

On November 18, 1925 George Edwin second married Lottie SHIPPY. Lottie died on April 30, 1940.

294 iii. Joseph Redmon (1873-1942)

iv. Minerva Sarah. Minerva Sarah was born on October 23, 1875. Minerva Sarah died in Lee's Summit, Missouri, on May 20, 1950; she was 74. Minerva Sarah was buried in Lee's Summit Cemetery.

On November 28, 1903 Minerva Sarah married Dan TAGGERT. Dan died in February 1911 in Lee's Summit, Missouri. Dan was buried in Lee's Summit Cemetery.

295 v. Mary Florence (1877-1929)

vi. Ada. Ada was born on December 10, 1881. Ada died in 1915; she was 33.

296 vii. Nancy May (1884-1959)

viii. Maggie Berneda. Maggie Berneda was born on December 31, 1888. Maggie Berneda died on September 8, 1963; she was 74.

Maggie Berneda married Thomas DICKERSON.

ix. Hope Lloyd. Hope Lloyd was born on October 23, 1885. Hope Lloyd died on December 30, 1918; he was 33. Hope Lloyd was buried in Lone Jack Cemetery, Lone Jack, Missouri.

Hope Lloyd married Belle FAULKENBERRY. Belle was born on July 14, 1887.

297 x. Ennis Winston "Jake" (1879-1961)


117. Sarah Minerva SHAWHAN (Daniel5, John4, Daniel3, Daniel2, Darby1). Sarah Minerva was born on July 13, 1842. Sarah Minerva died on March 13, 1911; she was 68.
Research: Sarah Minerva - eighth child of Daniel and Minerva - was born July 13, 1842. She married Elkin Lightfoot August 26, 1858. They had two children: Frank and Minnie. Elkin was born February 5, 1836 and died November 29, 1893. Sarah died March 13, 1911.
The Western Citizen

Fri 03 Sep 1858


Marriages:
At the Spencer House, Cincinnati, on the morning of the 26th ultimo by Rev. Dr. Nicholson, E. Davie Lightfoot of Falmouth to Miss Sallie M., daughter of D. Shawhan, Sr. of this county.
On August 26, 1858 Sarah Minerva married Elkin David LIGHTFOOT. Elkin David was born on February 5, 1836. Elkin David died on November 29, 1893; he was 57.
They had the following children:

298 i. "Big" Frank

ii. Minnie.
118. George Henry SHAWHAN (Daniel5, John4, Daniel3, Daniel2, Darby1). George Henry was born in Shawhan Station, Kentucky, on December 2, 1843. George Henry died in Lone Jack, Missouri, on July 28, 1912; he was 68.
A "Geo. H. Shawhan" is listed as serving in the Ky., 4th Cav., Co. D, CSA and a "George Shawhan" is listed as serving in the Ky., 11th Cav., Co. D, CSA.114
George H. Shawhan, Van Buren Twp. Proprietor of distillery and drug store at Lone Jack, was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, December 2, 1843, and was a son of Daniel and Minerva Shawhan.... [George's great-grandfather was] Daniel Shawhan, who was born in Kent County, Maryland, in the year 1741, and who built the first still, and manufactured the first whisky in Bourbon County, Kentucky, and who first gave to his manufactures the noted name of "Bourbon Whisky;" he commenced the manufacture of this brand of liquor in 1787. Mr. George H. Shawhan lived in Bourbon County, Kentucky, until sixteen years of age, then enlisted under D. Howard Smith, Colonel of the 5th Kentucky Cavalry, commanded by Abe Buford as brigadier-general, served about five months with that regiment, then served under Colonel Chenault for five months, and then returned to the original regiment commanded by Colonel D. Howard Smith, under General George H. (sic) Morgan. He was in [John Hunt] Morgan's noted raid through Ohio, and was twenty-one days and nights without rest; he was captured July 21, 1863, at Cheshire, Ohio, and sent to Columbus, Ohio, for one month , and then to Camp Douglas, Chicago, where he remained till the the close of the War. He then returned to Bourbon County, Kentucky, and lived there in 1872, engaged in farming, then came to Jackson County, Missouri, and located at Lone Jack, and engaged in his present business. [History of Jackson County, Missouri (Kansas City, 1881) p. 943]

-----


THE SHAWHAN WHISKEY
The following story was provided by Ronald T. Shawhan of New Jersey. It was written by Dorothy Butler for a local publication. The story is of Lone Jack, Missouri, once famous for whiskey and tobacco.
"This is s beautiful little hamlet, but for that damnable distillery over there" said the irate visiting minister of the Christian Church of Lone Jack disdainfully flung his hand in the direction of the Shawhan distillery. In the congregation for the first and only time he entered the church sat George Shawhan, giver of the land for the church, rocks for its foundation, and money for its erection when the till got low. He had come to the dedication of the church. He was the owner and operator of the distiller, and not being a church goer had been begged into attending the dedication of the church he had liberally benefited. He was only amused at the preacher's indignation.
George Shawhan had grown up with the distillery business. His great-grandfather Daniel (1736-1791) had distilled whiskey in Monogalia County, Virginia, now West Virginia; in the late 1700s and called it Monogalia Whiskey.
Soon after the Revolutionery War the government collected excise tax on distilled whiskey, and this was the signal for the Shawhans and other distillers to move West. Daniel and Margaret and their family settled in Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1784 beside a limestone spring, and began again to distill whiskey from the secret Shawhan formula, but because corn was scarce rye was added and accepted by the trade. This was the first still in Kentucky, and Daniel called its product "Bourbon" after the county.
Here for almost one hundred years, Daniel, followed by his son John (1771-1845), and then his grandson Daniel ( 1801-1860} ran the Shawhan distillery.
Shortly after the Civil War, in 1868, members of grandson Daniel's family settled at Lone Jack, soon to be followed in 1872 by George and Mary (Tatum) Shawhan, and the mother, Minerva Redmon Shawhan.
George had fought in the Civil War under Morgan. He bought a farm near Lone Jack, built a pond sand distillery. The pond became the swimming hole for the boys of the community, and the baptistry for the Christian and Baptist churches.
The distillery employed a boilerman, distiller, and a man to weight the grain. In the gallon house were three or five men who filled the bottles as the liquor was bought. According to the Kansas City Journal of June 27, 1901, Uncle Sam kept “a vigilant eye on the whiskey distiller. His agents practically run the shooting match. The distiller is allowed to make the whiskey, but not to touch it. A government storekeeper and gauger weights the grain into the bings, weights it into the hopper, and keeps a lock on everything from the time the raw material goes in until the distiller pays the government tax."
The capacity at first was two barrels of whiskey or 42 gallons each per day, but was later increased to three barrels. There was an excise tax of $1.10 per gallon on the (?) gallon whiskey. Peach brandy was added in 1878, and in 1879 George set out a 10 acre peach orchard.
We spent a day goinq through the account books of the distillery at the Jackson County Historical Society files in the Jackson Square Courthouse: we picked out names that were familiar in this locality so that readers could determine if their ancestors took advantage of the products of the Shawhan distillery and tobacco factory.
The old account books indicate that B.B. Cave bought 45 96/00 gallons of whiskey on August 10, and again the same amount on October 2, 1876, each deal costing $9l .80. In August 1877, he bought 43 26/100 gallons, and paid the last of his account by selling corn sheller to the distillery for $80.02. Dr. Edward Ragsdale's account is in one of the three account books. He is the doctor who cared for the wounded at the Bsttle of Lone Jack in 1862.
Others mentioned were William Johnson, Oak Grwe, $31.07; G.W. Tate, Lone Jack. $276, $221.65 and $75; R.M. Steele and J.W. Locke, Oak Grove; J.B. Keshler, Grain Valley; C.C. Bradley, Sni Mills; D.K. Murphy, Greenton.
Preacher Ounningham paid $9.65 cash in August 1881 for a keg of peach brandy that he had purchased in November 1880; Van Cleave & White, Lake City; Daniels and Parker. Grain Valley; W.F. Thomas, Blue Springs; John Garby, Oak Grove merchant, bought eight barrels in 1877 on account, making the final payment by "credit on mill."
Traded on account were onion sets, 20 pounds of pork $1; 11 pounds pork at $.05/pound, and a load of wood, $1, as listed on page 107 of one of the account books. Other items listed in 1879 were 1/2 load corn $4.30 pounds beef at $.05, $1.50; 30 pounds beef at $.065, $1.95; 15 bushels apples et $.50, $7.50; 5500 shingles at $3 per thousand, $16.50; 2 pounds yarn $1.75; 1 coat $6; 1 blouse $2.50; 100 feet lumber $1.50; 13 pounds sugar $1.82; 1 dozen brooms $2.25.
James Rolf hauled from Thomases 29 1/4 cords of wood on Jan. 31, 1880, and worked for 58 days at $39.20. On April 15, 1879 $10 was paid to Hammond for a "hoss." Hammond worked for 11 months in 1877 for $16 a month; and seven and a half months in 1879 for $120. John Quick and wife commenced work on March 21, 1881 for one year at $275, another item reads. There was a toothbrush charged to Mrs. Quick on this account at $.25, so there was apparentyl more than liquor sold at the store.
The Shawhans also had three large tobacco barns where tobacco grown around Lone Jack was dried, graded, and made into plugs, sack tobacco and cigars. At times merchents would trade goods for their supply of tobacco. J.E. Perkino at Sni Mills paid $11.75 in merchandise in 1885; a case of assorted nuggets were delivered by wagon to A. Roush at Strasburg, 1883; J.W. Minter, Oak Grove, bought a 10 pound sack of smoking tobacco in August 1883; Hull and Co., Oak Grove, bought 25 pounds gold nuggets at $.35, paid $1.50 by canned qoods and $4.58 by check.
The selections of tobacco were wide and the prices low - judging by today's prices - 25 pounds Gold Nugget $8.75; 15 pounds sack smoking, $6; Lone Jack Twist $4; Sweet Twist $5.S5; 10 pounds Grange Rolls $4.20; 50 Adigo Cigars $2.50 Prize Bull $1.75…The above notations from the tobacco account book show how extensive the tobacco operation was at Lone Jack, but it did not seem to gain fame and hold on to it as the Shawhan Whiskey did. There were several tobacco manufacturers in Lone Jack before Shawhan. In fact, he had bought the business from Hedrick & Co.
The books show that shipments of whiskey were made to several places in Kansas - Paola, Pleasonton, LaCygne, Trading Post and Council Grove, and perhaps many a keg of Shawhan whiskey was smashed by Carrie Nation.
Ten gallons of peach brandy were shipped to I.N. Keler, Shawhan Station, Ky., October 19, 1881, and paid with dogs on May 1, 1882. Doctors and druggists in the area kept barrels of Shawhan Whiskey on hand, and one druggist in Oak Groe lost some of his to burglars one night. Although he had other brands, Shwhan was the only barrel drained, “which says something for its quality," reported a local paper.
The Shawhans can trace their family back to 350 A.D. and beyond. In their genealogy book is written "The Shaughen family is descended from Milsius, King of Spain, through the line of his son Heremon. The founder of the family was Feachra, son of Enoch May Veagon, King of Ireland, 350 A.D." And somewhere down the line is Robert the Bruce, Robert I (1274-1329) King of Scotland. Incidently Robert was one of my favorite historical figures when I went to elementary school. It was he who hid in a cave while his pursuers were hunting him. He watched a spider build a web over the cavern mouth and took his perserverance from it. And the pursuers seeing the web across the cove said "He is not in there."
James Shawhan of Lone Jack is a great-great-great grandson of the originator of Shawhan Whiskey. He and Mrs. Shawhan heve given much help in the writing of this article. Other descendants in this area are Junior Shawhan, Lone. Jack; Rex Rowan, Kansas City, who also helped in this writing; Elizabeth Grubb and Wayne Shawhan, Oak Grove, and Harold Shawhan, Buckner.
Mrs. Shawhan, writing for the Jackson County Historical Society, Dec., 1965, gave the following information: "Steam furnished the power for the distillery, and water was drawn from a large pond…Sept. 19, 1 1880, while apple jack was being made, the still blew up. A coil became stopped up with the apple pumace, and when Daniel Perrow increased the boiler pressure to clear the coil, it exploded. Perrow, his son, Will and Tommie Lester were killed. Six others were seriously injured. Twenty years later in January, 1900, at midnight the distillery caught fire and burned. The fire was caused by a defect in the wall around the boiler. At that time there were 800 barrels of whiskey in the warehouse” which did not burn.
George Shawhan did not attempt to rebuild. He went to Weston, Mo. and purchased the Holladay distillery, and moved his family there.
Mr. Shawhan had a high grade herd of Jersey cettle, with which he took several prizes at the Chicago World’s Fair. One of his cows carried off nearly all the prizes offered at state fairs at the turn of the century and was the first cow west of the Mississippi River to take first prize at a world's fair. The Shawhan herd contained 49 high grade cows which were fed on mash from the distillery..."the greatest cattle food in existence" the Kansas City Journal, June 27, 1901 declared.

-----


The Shawhans contributed to the lore by making Lone Jack famous for whiskey and tobacco, principally through the efforts of George H. Shawhan (1843-1912) who settled in the area in 1872, after migrating from Bourbon County,Ky. together with his wife Mary (Tatman) and mother, Minerva (Redmon) Shawhan.
George had grown up with the distillery business. His great-grandfather Daniel (1738-1791) distilled corn whiskey in Pennsylvania before moving west to live beside a limestone spring in Bourbon County, Ky. where he again began to distill. Because corn was scarce, Rye was added to the secret Shawhan formula and the product was called "Bourbon." Daniel's son John (1771-1845) and grandson Daniel (1801-1860), George's father, continued to manage the famlly's disti11ery in Kentucky.
George's father, Daniel, was known as "Cashier Dan" because he paid all bills with cash. On November 17, 1825, George married Minerva Redmon, (l807-l890), a descendant of Robert the Bruce (1274-1329), one of the greatest of Scottish Kings. Twelve chi1dren resulted:
George H. also joined the troopers under Gen. John Morgan, and fought until he was captured during a raid into Ohio, after which he remained a prisoner for the duration, held In a camp at Ft. Douglas, Wiaconsin.
ln Lone Jack, Missouri he settled near a spring-fed pond and opened his distillery, initially employing a boilerman, distiller, and a man to weigh the grain. A powerful 6 foot, 5 inch, 250-pounder, George was known to be able to raise a 400 pound barrel of whiskey to his lips for a taste test.
Peach brandy was added to the family’s business in 1878, but the Shawhan specialitles remained the bourbon, straight, rye, and white corn whiskies which had gained such a wide reputation over four generations.
To make 100 proof bottled-in-bond whiskey, the distillery would put the distilled spirits in new oaken casks for four years, being poured into the barrels at 101 proof (about 50.5% alcohol). Because wood absorbs water and not alcohol, during the aging process the whiskey would rise to 106 to 108 proof; water was then added to bring it down to 100 proof during storage.
Near the distillery was located the “Gallon House,” which sold whiskey for home consumption; three to five men were kept busy filling bottles as customers came in for purchases. ln those days, a gallon of 100 proof whiskey could be had for $3.50 plus $1.10 Federal excise tax.
The whiskey was shipped to doctors, druggists, saloons, and other customers throughout the area. Saloons bought the spirits in barrels, then transferred it to heavy 2-pound class bottles called "bar bottles" for serving to their customers. George himself had a saloon in Kansas City, at the corner of Missouri and Oak streets.
The Shawhans had three large barns where tobacco grown around Lone Jack was dried, graded, and made into plugs, sack tobacco,and cigars. George also had a high grade herd of Jersey cattle with which he took several prizes at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair; they were fed on mash from the distillery.
Shawhan distillery products continued to be sold in the Kansas City area until the advent of Prohibition. The old, cork-topped Shawhan liquor bottles and other memorabilia have now become collectors' items.
The story of Lone Jack and the pioneers who made it a name in the pages of history have not been forgotten. Yearly "Battle of Lone Jack" and "Cole Younger Days" festivities are held to commemorate times gone past and the people who lived them. {R.T. Shawhan, pp. 22-24}
_________________________________________
The following is from the Federal Records of Missouri:115
1898: Distillery No. 8 - Barton and D. Holladay (wasn't distillery)
1898: Distillery No. 59 - Geo. H. Shawhan, Lone Jack, Missouri (was distillery)
1901: Distillery No. 8 - D. Holladay and B.B. Joffee as D. Holladay Distillery. They were withdrawing spirits but were not distilling.
1901: G.H. Shawhan was withdrawing whiskey from warehouse No. 59 at Lone Jack - not distilling.
1903: D. Holladay - Distillery No.8 withdrawing spirits, but not distilling. Geo. H. Shawhan was listed as such. Weston, Missouri, Distillery No.8
1903: Geo. H. Shawhan still withdrawing whiskey from Distillery Warehouse No. 59 at Lone Jack (not distilling)
1904: The Shawhan Distillery No. 8, Weston, Missouri, was distilling.
1904: Geo. H. Shawhan withdrew his whiskey from warehouse No. 59 at Lone Jack upon payment of tax.
1914: Shawhan still listed at Weston, Distillery No. 8, at Lone Jack.
It would appear that Geo. Shawhan's Distillery No. 59 burned around 1900 but his warehouse did not.
Lone Jack bourbon or rye whiskey could be purchased for $3.50 for four full quarts. Federal excise tax was $1.10 a gallon.
On September 19, 1880, when apple jack was being made, the still blew up. Three persons, Daniel Perrow, his son, Will, and Tommie Lester, were killed. Six others were seriously injured. The coil became stopped up with apple pumice and when Perrow increased the boiler pressure up to clear the coil, it exploded.
Twenty years later, in Jan., 1900, at midnight the distillery was destroyed by fire caused by a defect in the wall around the boiler. There were about 800 barrels of whiskey in the warehouse.
Steam furnished the power for the distillery and water was drawn from a large pond. The pond also served as a swimming hole and as a baptistry for the Christian and Baptist churches.
The last distillery of the Geo. H. Shawhan family was the Spring River Distillery at Verona. R.J.Baker married Sarah Shawhan (daughter) and J.O.Tong married Lorena Shawhan Lackey (granddaughter) of George Shawhan. The distillery was purchased in 1907 and sold in 1918. The gaugers of the distillery were: E.R. Applegate, Sam Frost, E.A. Rumbaugh, and Mr. Sullins.
On January 20, 1868 George Henry married Mary Francis TATMAN, daughter of William Lee TATMAN & Elizabeth SIDLES (April 14, 1833-May 7, 1888). Mary Francis was born in Brown County, Ohio, on March 16, 1851. Mary Francis died in Lone Jack, Missouri, on February 2, 1938; she was 86.
They had the following children:

299 i. Daniel Lee (1869-1945)

300 ii. Margaret Lulu (1871-1932)

301 iii. Beulah Florence (1873-1954)

302 iv. Edna Minerva (1875-1901)

v. Georgia Elizabeth. Georgia Elizabeth was born on October 26, 1877. Georgia Elizabeth died on May 30, 1878; she was <1.

303 vi. Sarah Georgia "Sallie" (1879-1945)

1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   79


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page