Recognising achievement



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RECOGNISING ACHIEVEMENT

OXFORD CAMBRIDGE AND RSA EXAMINATIONS General Certificate of Secondary Education

HISTORY B (MODERN WORLD) PAPER 2 (British Depth Study)

Thursday 15 JUNE 2006



1937/2

Morning

1 hour 30 minutes

Additional material:

8-page answer booklet



TIME 1 hour 30 minutes

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

. Write your name, Centre number and candidate number on the answer booklet.

. Study the Background Information and the sources carefully. You are advised to spend at least

ten minutes doing this.

. Answer all the questions.

. Write your answers, in blue or black ink, in the answer booklet.

. Read each question carefully. Make sure you know what to do before you start your answer.

. Write the numbers of the questions you have answered in the box on the front of the answer

booklet.


INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES

. The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question. . The total number of marks for this paper is 50.

This question paper consists of 7 printed pages and 3 blank pages.

o 00 N

SPA (MML 11462 9/05) T11595/3 @ OCR 2006 [100/1182/1]

Registered Charity Number: 1066969

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Study the Background Information and the sources carefully. You are advised to spend at least ten minutes doing this.

In answering the questions, you will need to use your knowledge of the topic to interpret and evaluate the sources. When you are asked to use specific sources you must do so, but you may also use any of the other sources if they are relevant.

Answer ALL the questions.

1 Study Source A.

What is the message of this poster? Use details of the poster and your knowledge to explain your answer. [6]

2 Study Sources Band C.

Why do these two letters show different attitudes towards Germany? Use details of the letters

and your knowledge to explain your answer. [9]



3 Study Sources 0 and E.

Which source do you trust more as evidence about British government control of propaganda

during the war? Use details of the sources and your knowledge to explain your answer. [9]



4 Study Source F.

Why was this poster issued by the government in 1917? Use details of the poster and your

knowledge to explain your answer. [7]



5 Study Sou rce G.

How useful is this source in understanding how much opposition there was in Britain to the war?

Use details of the source and your knowledge to explain your answer. [7]



6 Study all the sources.

'Government propaganda failed to convince the British public to support World War One'.

How far do the sources in this paper support this statement? Use details of the sources and your

knowledge to explain your answer. Remember to identify the sources you use. [12]



1937/2 Jun06




4

DID GOVERNMENT PROPAGANDA FAIL TO CONVINCE THE BRITISH PUBLIC TO SUPPORT WORLD WAR ONE?

Background Information

When war broke out in 1914 Britain expected it to be over by Christmas. As the war developed, the government increased its control over personal freedom and censored news about the war. Some historians claim that by using propaganda the government was able to maintain support for the war. Other historians argue that such influence was not possible because the war affected every aspect of British life. So, did government propaganda fail to convince the British public to support the war?

SOURCE A

A British Government poster, 1915.

1937/2 Jun06

5


SOURCE B

We had a gas attack the other afternoon, but our smoke helmets kept us safe. We keep working hard to defeat Wilhelm the Murderer*, and having seen the work of his army - ruined towns and villages, the wholesale murder of helpless women and children - I am glad I joined up. Consequently, we were cruelly shocked when we received Monday's newspapers to see that the South Wales miners had come out on strike.

An extract from a British soldier's letter to his family It was published in a Yorkshire newspaper, 21 August 1915.

[* Kaiser Wilhelm 11, German Emperor.]

SOURCE C

Women have suffered so terribly because of the cruelty of the government. It does not care about the inhuman conditions it has forced on our suffering working women. Consequently, even if the Germans invaded England we could not see worse things than we see today. After all, British women are outlaws in their own land and they could be no worse off under German rule.

An extract from a letter to LIoyd George. It was written by Mrs. Sennett, a women's suffrage leader, 10 August 1915.

SOURCE D

Recently a film about the Battle of the Somme was shown in England. The film, made by the British government, emphasises English bravery and minimises our efforts. It has enjoyed enormous success with the English public and is an actual, generally truthful war film. This has had a powerful impact on people. Consequently, we must respond and produce our own film, 'With our heroes on the Somme'.

From a document sent by the German War Ministry to the German Chancellor,

21 October 1916.

SOURCE E

I spoke last night to a war journalist about the war. He gave me the most impressive and moving description of what war on the Western Front really means. If the public really knew what the war is like, it would be stopped tomorrow. But, of course, they don't know and can't know. The censors will not allow newspapers to publish the truth. What newspapers describe is not the war, but just a pretty picture of the war.

A private comment by LIoyd George, December 1917.

1937/2 Jun06

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6

SOURCE F

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THESE WOMEN ARE

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A British Government poster, 1917.

SOURCE G

There was enough support from the well-off and politically important middle-classes to make sure that these brave conscientious objectors were dealt with less severely by the courts than they might have been. A general mood of mistrust about the war meant that these heroes were not victimised in the town. There were 120 conscientious objectors who appeared in court, proud to show their feelings. It looks like the town was not an exception and this means that the usual picture of support for the war does not reflect reality.

An extract from a study of a Yorkshire industrial town, published in 2001.

1937/2 Jun06


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