Reading for essays 3 and 4



Download 22.6 Kb.
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size22.6 Kb.
READING FOR ESSAYS 3 AND 4
(Consult Feinstein and Thomas 2002 pp. 438-445, 501-503 for a short technical discussion of the material.)
Title: Searching for an Explanation of Unemployment in Interwar

Britain


Author(s): Benjamin, Daniel K.; Kochin, Levis A.

Source: The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 87, No. 3. (Jun.,

1979), pp. 441-478.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3808%28197906%2987%3A3%3C441%3ASFAEOU%3E2.0.CO%3B2-X


Abstract: From 1921 to 1938 unemployment in Britain averaged 14

percent and never fell below 9.5 percent. Three largely

independent sets of evidence indicate that the prolonged

high unemployment was due to the operation of an

unemployment insurance scheme that paid benefits that were

high relative to wages and available subject to few

restrictions. We estimate that the insurance system raised

the unemployment rate by five to eight percentage points

on average and that in the absence of the system

unemployment would have been at normal levels through much

of the period. Although a few interwar observers saw

clearly the effects of unemployment insurance, Keynes and

his followers did not.
Title: Unemployment in Interwar Britain: Still Searching for an

Explanation

Author(s): Collins, Michael

Source: The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 90, No. 2. (Apr.,

1982), pp. 369-379.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3808%28198204%2990%3A2%3C369%3AUIIBSS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-6


Title: How Much Voluntary Unemployment in Interwar Britain?

Author(s): Cross, Rodney

Source: The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 90, No. 2. (Apr.,

1982), pp. 380-385.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3808%28198204%2990%3A2%3C380%3AHMVUII%3E2.0.CO%3B2-H
Title: Still Searching for an Explanation of Unemployment in

Interwar Britain

Author(s): Metcalf, David; Nickell, Stephen J.; Floros, Nicos

Source: The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 90, No. 2. (Apr.,

1982), pp. 386-399.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3808%28198204%2990%3A2%3C386%3ASSFAEO%3E2.0.CO%3B2-7


Title: Unemployment in Interwar Britain

Author(s): Ormerod, P. A.; Worswick, G. D. N.

Source: The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 90, No. 2. (Apr.,

1982), pp. 400-409.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3808%28198204%2990%3A2%3C400%3AUIIB%3E2.0.CO%3B2-X
Title: Unemployment and Unemployment Benefits in

Twentieth-Century Britain: A Reply to Our Critics

Author(s): Benjamin, Daniel K.; Kochin, Levis A.

Source: The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 90, No. 2. (Apr.,

1982), pp. 410-436.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3808%28198204%2990%3A2%3C410%3AUAUBIT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-B


Title: Unemployment in Interwar Britain: A Case for Re-Learning

the Lessons of the 1930s?

Author(s): Glynn, Sean; Booth, Alan

Source: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 36, No. 3.

(Aug., 1983), pp. 329-348.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0013-0117%28198308%292%3A36%3A3%3C329%3AUIIBAC%3E2.0.CO%3B2-D


Abstract: This paper surveys recent literature on unemployment and

the experience of unemployment in interwar Britain. It is

argued that the causes of British interwar unemployment

are multiple and result from a complex interaction of both

long-run and short-run influences. A 'dual economy' model

is advanced, with heavy 'classical' unemployment in the

staple industries, and growth sectors constrained by the

level of demand. In this light, the criticisms (largely

from a Keynesian perspective) which have been made of

interwar government policy are considered with scepticism.

A unilateral solution to the unemployment problem was

always remote, but amelioration was possible. Unemployment

relief is examined in some detail, and, in general, it is

argued that the benefits system was not a major cause of

unemployment, but its effects in supporting wages and the

existing social order are stressed.


Title: The Origins and Nature of the Great Slump Revisited

Author(s): Eichengreen, Barry

Source: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 45, No. 2.

(May, 1992), pp. 213-239.

Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0013-0117%28199205%292%3A45%3A2%3C213%3ATOANOT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Y
Abstract: More than a decade has passed since the Economic History

Society last published a survey of the depression of the

I930s. That survey was notable for the lack of consensus

it revealed. The events requiring explanation were clearly

identified, but for each there seemed to be many potential

explanations and little agreement among scholars. Given

this state of affairs, the reader may ask what justifies

another survey of familiar terrain. The answer is that the

last decade has witnessed a hidden revolution in our

understanding of the I930s. On many of the central issues

raised by the earlier literature, a striking degree of

consensus has now emerged.


Also (for the first example in the Regression lecture in session 3):
Title: British Investment in Argentina and Long Swings,

1880-1914

Author(s): A. G. Ford

Source: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 31, No. 3. (Sep.,

1971), pp. 650-663.

Stable URL:



http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-0507%28197109%2931%3A3%3C650%3ABIIAAL%3E2.0.CO%3B2-K


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page