Race and Time – engl 4550/aas 4555/engl 6995/aas 6995 (4 credits) Instructor: Shelley Wong Spring 2016 Wednesday 12: 20-2: 15 Rockefeller B16



Download 26.5 Kb.
Date18.04.2016
Size26.5 Kb.
Race and Time – ENGL 4550/AAS 4555/ENGL 6995/AAS 6995 (4 credits)

Instructor: Shelley Wong

Spring 2016 - Wednesday 12:20-2:15 Rockefeller B16


evolutionary ladderspiral clock ancient chinese water clock egyptian clepsydra stepsdecimal clock

This course will turn on three key terms: race, comparison, and time. What do these terms have to do with each other? What does it mean to be in time, or out of time? What are some other ways of inhabiting time, or of being inhabited by time? What is the time of the racialized subject? How might such a temporality be figured through literary representation? What is the time of comparison? What is the role of time in the racialization of institutional knowledge production? We’ll take up these and a host of other questions pertaining to the politics and poetics of time by working our way through writings ranging across the fields of the literary, anthropological, philosophical, linguistic, psychoanalytic, and sociological.





R

Office Hours:

Wednesday 3:00-4:00

Thursday 12:30-1:30

282 Goldwin Smith Hall

(or by appointment)




Required readings:
James Baldwin, Notes of a Native Son

Carlos Bulosan, America Is In the Heart

Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower

Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, DICTEE

Johannes Fabian, Time and the Other: How Anthropology Makes Its Object

Frantz Fanon, Black Skin White Masks (the Grove Press edition translated by Charles Lam Markmann)

Carolivia Herron, Thereafter Johnnie

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place

Joy Kogawa, Obasan

Bharati Mukherjee, Jasmine


Additional readings (in the form of essays or excerpted writings) from some of the following authors will be available on Blackboard: Paul Ricoeur, Michael Hanchard, Cathy Caruth, Sigmund Freud, Ernst Bloch, Dipesh Chakrabarty, John Bender, David Wellbery, Jonathan Z. Smith, Rey Chow, Osamu Nishitani, Naoki Sakai, Natalie Melas, Walter Benjamin, W.E.B. Du Bois

Course Requirements:


  • regular and punctual attendance and active participation in seminar discussion (including one or two stints as a discussant for a presentation) (20%)

  • one 15-20 minute oral presentation (10%)

  • informal writing assignments: two 2-page quick takes on a reading of your choice (these 2-pagers may be used as the basis of, or incorporated into, one of your formal essays) (5%)

  • formal writing assignments: one 5-6 page mid-term essay (25%) and one 10-12 page term paper (40%)

  • (please see me about the course requirements if you’re auditing the course, taking it S/U, or as an English graduate seminar.)



_____________


SYLLABUS

(subject to change)



Week 1

January 27 – introduction
Week 2

February 3 – chronopolitics

- Johannes Fabian, Time and the Other: chapter 1, “Time and the Emerging Other,” and chapter 5 “Conclusions”

- Osamu Nishitani, “Anthropos and Humanitas: Two Western Concepts of ‘Human Being’”

- Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Global Transformations: Anthropology and the Modern World, chapter 1, “Anthropology and the Savage Slot: The Poetics and Politics of Otherness” (recommended)



Week 3

February 10the time of comparison

- Natalie Melas, “Versions of Incommensurability”

- Frantz Fanon, “The Fact of Blackness” from Black Skin White Masks

- W.E.B. Du Bois, “Of Our Spiritual Strivings” from The Souls of Black Folk

- James Baldwin, “Introduction,” “Autobiographical Notes,” and “Stranger in the Village” from Notes of a Native Son
Week 4

February 17chronotypes: the poetics and politics of form

- Carlos Bulosan, America Is In the Heart

- Johannes Fabian, Time and the Other, chapter 2 “Our Time, Their Time, No Time: Coevalness Denied” (recommended)
Week 5

February 24narrating otherness

- James Baldwin, “Many Thousands Gone,”

- Dipesh Chakrabarty, “The Idea of Provincializing Europe” from Provincializing Europe

- Rey Chow, “The Secrets of Ethnic Abjection” and “On Chineseness as a Theoretical Problem”

- Johannes Fabian, chapter 3 “Time and Writing About the Other” (recommended)

- Informal 2-page writing#1 due today
Week 6

March 2time and the ethics of waiting

- Joy Kogawa, Obasan

- Sigmund Freud, excerpt from Beyond the Pleasure Principle

- Cathy Caruth, selections from Unclaimed Experience


Week 7

March 9waiting on futures and pasts

- Joy Kogawa, Obasan

- Ernst Bloch, selections from Heritage of Our Times

- Walter Benjamin, “On the Concept of History”


Week 8

March 16event and happening

- Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place

- Informal 2-page writing #2 due today
Week 9

March 23 – no class today

- 5-6 page paper is due at 12pm on Friday, March 25th. Please email me a soft copy of your paper and leave a hard copy of it for me in my English Department mailbox (the mailroom is next door to the English Department main office at 250 Goldwin Smith Hall).



Week 10

March 30 – spring break
Week 11

April 6the time of the fathers

- Carolivia Herron, Thereafter Johnnie




Week 12

April 13 the time of the fathers

- Carolivia Herron, Thereafter Johnnie


Week 13

April 20 violence and futures 1

- Bharati Mukherjee, Jasmine

- Jonathan Smith, “A Slip in Time Saves Nine: Prestigious Origins Again”
Week 14

April 27 violence and futures 2

- Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower

- (This class may have to be rescheduled and shifted to either Monday, April 25th or Tuesday, April 26th)
Week 15

May 4time and translation

- Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, DICTEE


Week 16

May 11 – the time of the university

- Naoki Sakai, “Dislocation of the West and the Status of the Humanities”

- Osamu Nishitani, “Anthropos and Humanitas: Two Western Concepts of ‘Human Being’”

- Rey Chow, “On Chineseness as a Theoretical Problem”


Week 17

May 17 – Term paper due today by 4:00pm. Please turn in a hard copy of the paper to my departmental mailbox and email me a soft copy of the paper. The mailroom closes at 4:30pm.



Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page