Purpose/Rationale for lesson



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Name: Geoffrey T. Stuckart Age/Grade Level: 11th grade

Subject Area(s): AP US History Unit Title: The U.S. in the 1930s

Lesson Title: Evaluating the New Deal Estimated Time: 50 minutes
Purpose/Rationale for lesson:

This lesson builds on the knowledge gained in the previous lesson (Happy Days Are Here Again). In this lesson, students will consider and evaluate the New Deal from different perspectives in order to address the (unit) question: Was the New Deal a good deal?


Curriculum Framing Questions:

Essential Question:

How can we understand the 1930s through the lens of international relations, civil rights, economics, and government/politics?
Unit Question that applies to this lesson:

Was the New Deal a good deal?


Lesson or Content Question(s):

What were some differing contemporary perspectives on the New Deal?

How did the federal government’s role change during the Great Depression and the New Deal?

How did people’s expectations of the federal government’s role change during the Great Depression and the New Deal?


Goal:

Students will explore and understand differing contemporary perspectives on various New Deal reforms. Students will also understand how the New Deal redefined the role of government in the U.S.


Learning Objective(s):

  1. Students will be able to explain and evaluate differing contemporary perspectives of the New Deal.

  2. Students will be able to connect New Deal initiatives to present day features of government, the economy and society.

  3. Students will be able to compare the federal government’s role before and after the Great Depression and evaluate people’s perceptions/expectations of the federal government’s role.


Curriculum Standard(s):

SS.HS.HS.06.06

Understand how the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration and the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, redefined the role of government, and had a profound impact on American life.
SS.HS.CG.01

Understand the purpose of laws and government, provisions to limit power, and the ability to meet changing needs as essential ideas of the Constitution.


SS.HS.EC.05

Understand how government can affect the national economy through policy.


SS.HS.EC.06.02

Identify and give examples of ways that the U.S. government can affect the economy through legislation or policy decisions.


Materials Needed:

Laptop computer, LCD projector


Background knowledge or skills students need prior to lesson:

Skills

Students have previous experience constructing historical timelines


Readings

The American Pageant: AP Edition — Students will have read chapter 33, “The Great Depression and the New Deal,” (pages 770-799) in their textbooks prior to class.

The American Spirit, Volume II (a textbook containing excerpted original source documents) – Students will have read the documents in the sections, “An Enigma in the White House” and “Voices of Protest” pages 312-322, and “The Supreme Court Fight and After,” pages 334-339. These documents lay out many differing points of view of FDR, the New Deal and the “court packing” episode.
Hook or Introduction:

See Procedures (below)


Procedures:




Activity


Time

Hook / Intro


When bell rings, Teacher welcomes class. Teacher discusses agenda for the day, takes roll and answers any clarifying questions from students.
Directions (displayed on PowerPoint):

  • Please take out your notebooks and start a new section titled: “Evaluating the New Deal”

Teacher talk:



  • At this point you have read a lot about the New Deal.

  • To get us started today, we’re going to compare what we know about the New Deal of Franklin Roosevelt with the Next New Deal, a current idea.

  • We’ll watch a video clip about the Next New Deal a few times.

  • We’re going to discuss similarities and differences, so you may want to take notes.

Teacher plays Next New Deal video clip (embedded in PowerPoint hyperlink or via Internet connection at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Et50Num1f54). May need to play the 1:12 minute clip several times for students to get concepts adequately.


Teacher begins discussion; seeks input from many different students.
Questions:

  • What are some similarities between the Next New Deal called for in the video clip and FDR’s New Deal?

  • What are some differences?

  • What are some of the practical problems in passing the Next New Deal?

  • Would you support the Next New Deal?

  • Would you have supported FDR’s New Deal if you had lived in the 1930s?

  • Is there anyone who would support one and not the other? Why?


Teacher is seeking higher-order thinking as students compare/contrast and evaluate FDR’s New Deal and the current Next New Deal proposal. Teacher is also seeking an engaging, real-world connection between the New Deal and students’ own lives. Teacher is using the discussion as an informal, summative assessment of students’ understanding of the New Deal.


5 minutes

10-15 minutes




Discussion and evaluation of the New Deal

Teacher begins discussion of New Deal / readings. Teacher displays 10 questions (see below) on PowerPoint and designates whiteboard/chalkboard space for each question. Students will engage in “Silent Graffiti” – silently passing dry erase markers/chalk to each other to answer the questions.
Teacher talk:

  • You have read about the New Deal in chapter 33 of your textbooks and you have done a lot of additional readings on the topic.

  • We are going to spend the first 10 minutes doing “Silent Graffiti” -- silently passing dry erase markers/chalk to each other to answer the questions.

  • During “Silent Graffiti” there is no talking. You may pass the markers/chalk to anyone you wish, or people may raise their hand to indicate they would like to write, but you have to hand the marker/chalk to someone.

  • After 10 minutes or so we will discuss what’s on the board and what’s missing.

  • Please take notes as we discuss this today.

Possible questions:



  1. Does anyone have any new insights about the New Deal after constructing your timelines yesterday?




  1. What were some differing contemporary perspectives on the New Deal? Who were the supporters of the New Deal? The opponents? Why do you think each side felt that way?




  1. How did the federal government’s role change during the Great Depression and the New Deal (political, economic, civil rights, etc.)? How did people’s expectations of the federal government’s role change during the Great Depression and the New Deal?




  1. Were “Happy Days Here Again” in 1933? If not, when?




  1. What were some regulatory reforms of the New Deal? Who supported and opposed those? What are the implications and connections of those reforms to today?




  1. What were some labor reforms of the New Deal? Who supported and opposed those? What are the implications and connections of those reforms to today?




  1. What were some changes in voting behavior during the New Deal? Why was there a change? What are the implications and connections of those changes in voting behavior to today?




  1. Do you see any relationship between the New Deal and life in the U.S. today?




  1. From what you’ve read, do you think FDR was rigid or flexible? Why do you say that? Be specific.




  1. There is a saying that, “the end justifies the means.” Do you think FDR was more concerned with the means or the ends? Give an example.


Teacher is seeking higher-order thinking through critical analysis and critique of elements of the New Deal. Teacher is seeking to tie the lesson to the present day to increase student engagement and learning.


25-35 minutes

Closure



Teacher reviews agenda and homework assignment for next class:

  • Complete your reading of chapter 34, “Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Shadow of War,” in your American Pageant textbook.

  • Read all of the excerpted documents in “Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Shadow of War, 1933-1941,” pages 341-359, in your American Spirit. NOTE: Do not read Section E. The Blame for Pearl Harbor (pages 359-363).

Student Q&As




2-3 minutes


Differentiation/Accommodation:

No IEPs in classroom.


TAG: Research the Next New Deal proposal in more detail and draft a short essay detailing your views of the political prospects of the proposal.
Attention to Literacy:

  • Students read and interpret the The American Pageant textbook and excerpted source documents from The American Spirit.

  • Students use a video clip to compare the New Deal to a current public policy proposal called the Next New Deal.

  • Students engage in “Silent Graffiti” exercise.

  • Students take notes during class discussion.


Closure:

See Procedures above


Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning:

  • Teacher is using the discussions for informal, formative assessment of students’ understanding of the New Deal.




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