Purpose: Describe the meaning of taxation without representation and why the colonists were so upset by the British taxing them. Usi. 5 (d) identifying the political and economic relationships between the colonies and Great Britain



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Kathy Bangs

2/29/16


Lesson Plan

Purpose:

  • Describe the meaning of taxation without representation and why the colonists were so upset by the British taxing them.

  • USI.5 (d) identifying the political and economic relationships between the colonies and Great Britain.

Objectives:

  • The students will be able to observe why the colonists felt so angered by the taxes from the British by splitting into two teams, the British tax collectors and the colonists, and describe the meaning of taxation without representation to a degree of 80% accuracy.

Procedure:

  • Introduction

    • Today the students will get hands on demonstration/visual of what taxation without representation was like for the colonists because of the British tax collectors.

  • Development

    • After reading the chapter that corresponds with this lesson and going over/reviewing the information that was read in class on a PowerPoint, this activity will take place to learn the information in a hands on way of learning.

    • After the PowerPoint, the class will have a discussion about why the colonies wanted their independence from Britain and if they thought the taxes on the colonists were fair or not; also talk about what taxation without representation means.

    • When the class is done talking about what they think taxation without representation means, I will explain the game to the students:

As a class we will come up with different things they could be taxed on :

  • Tax on books

  • Tax on tardiness

  • Tax on pens/pencils, etc.

The students that are the tax collectors, parliament, and the king will pick 10-12 of the taxes listed to tax the colonists on, there will also be a tax on students (colonists) that get too loud during the lesson.

Each student receives a cup with candy in it. The teacher then reads all the taxes the collectors, parliament, and the king decided on and tell the students that are the colonists that the collectors, parliament, and the king will come take one piece of candy for each tax that applies to them.



  • For example, if a student that is a colonist has a pencil and one of the taxes is for pencils, the collectors, parliament, and the king will take a piece of the colonists candy out of their cup if they have a pencil.

  • Also anytime a student is talking too loud they will get a piece of their candy taken out of their cup as well.

  • If students refuses to give candy to collector then that colonists gets put near the corner of the room (jail) and the collectors take the colonists whole cup of candy.

  • After the tax collectors have collected all the candy, they keep 10%, give parliament 40%, and the king gets 50% of what was collected.

Once all the candy has been divided, the students that are the colonists are to count how much candy they have left, if they have any, then ask the collectors, Parliament, and the king to count how much candy they have.

  • Summary

  • Have another discussion after the game is over and ask the students that were the colonists how they felt when their candy was taken and given to the collectors, parliament, and the king and why they feel that way and if they thought the taxes were fair.

  • Ask how the demonstration represented what the tax system was like in colonial America.

Materials:

  • Pieces of candy (15-20 per student) ex: M&Ms, Skittles, etc.

  • Cups (each student gets one)

  • Paper

  • Whiteboard/chalkboard

  • Dry-Erase Markers/chalk

Evaluation Part A:

  • Have a whole group discussion about why the students think the colonists felt the way they did about the British taxes.

The taxes were not justified, the British made whatever taxes they wanted to just so they could take the colonists’ money.

The British could just make up taxes whenever they felt like and on whatever they felt like.



  • Have a whole group discussion about what “taxation without representation” means and why it is important.

The colonists had no say in what their tax money was spent on.

Evaluation Part B:

  • What were the strengths of the lesson?



  • What were the weaknesses of the lesson?



  • Did the lesson address the needs of all the students?


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