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PBL Lesson Plan for Diverse Learners


Original Title: Book Review Board chooses top 5 fictional books for 5th graders to read about historical ways of life

Primary Subject Area: Language Arts

Outside Subject Area: Social Studies/History
Description of Student Roles and Problem Situation:

The elementary school principal has decided that the fifth-grade students can only read five historical fiction books. She has appointed a Book Review Board to select these books. The board must pick the best five books that every fifth-grade student must read and enjoy. Students will assume the roles of the Book Review Board members. The board is composed of one history teacher, one language arts teacher, one parent, and one student. A decision must be made in time for the next school year. Once the board has made its selections, members must present the book list to the principal and justify their choices.



Teacher: Mrs. Cameron Lawracy

Grade Level: 5th grade
Adaptations for students from non-western culture

Allow historical events/periods to be from students’ native culture or from a different perspective

Discuss important American historical events/periods with student before assignment to ensure comprehension

Allow some of chosen books to be about characters with same/similar nature culture


Adaptations for ESOL students

Chose class speaker who speaks ESOL student language to give presentation about their experience during a historical event/period

Allow one book report to be written in native language and in English

Allow ESOL students to work together when writing their book reports to help with grammar and comprehension

Ensure some historical fiction children’s books are available in ESOL student’s native language
Title, Learner Characteristics, and Sunshine State Standards

PBL Lesson Plan for Diverse Students


Teacher: Mrs. Cameron Lawracy

Grade Level: 5th grade

PBL Lesson Plan Title: Book Review Board chooses top 5 fictional books for 5th graders to read about historical ways of life

Primary Subject Area: Language Arts

Outside Subject Area: Social Studies/History
Synopsis: The elementary school principal has decided that the fifth-grade students can only read 5 historical fiction books. He has appointed a Book Review Board to select these books. The board must pick the best five books that every fifth-grade student must read and enjoy.
Sunshine State Standards

Primary: Language Arts

Strand A: Reading

Standard 1: The student uses the reading process effectively.

Benchmark LA.A.1.2.1: The student uses a table of contents, index, headings, captions, illustrations, and major words to anticipate or predict content and purpose of a reading selection.


Strand A: Reading

Standard 2: The student constructs meaning from a wide range of texts.

Benchmark LA.A.2.2.2: The student identifies the author’s purpose in a simple text.
Secondary: Social Studies

Strand A: Time, Continuity, and Change (History)

Standard 1: The student understands historical chronology and historical perspective.

Benchmark SS.A.1.2.1: The student understands how individuals, ideas, decisions, and events can influence history.


Learner Characteristics

Physical: “Fourth and fifth graders can sit quietly for extended periods and concentrate on whatever intellectual task is at hand” (Snowman and Biehler, page 79). A large portion of this lesson plan requires students to sit and browse many books. Students in this age group have the ability to sit quietly and work on a lengthy task, thus making this an appropriate assignment.

Social: “[Students] will avoid the opposite sex when left to their own devices (Mitchell, 1990)” (Snowman and Biehler, page 79). Students will be working together in small groups for this assignment. In order to address their tendency to segregate based on gender, I plan to have diverse groups gender-wise so that assignment results (i.e. book choices) are not gender-skewed.

Cognitive: “The elementary grade child can think logically…” (Snowman and Biehler, page 81). This assignment allows students to choose books based on their logic and reasoning. Since students of this age have the capability to make choices based on logic, they will be able to explain their reasoning for their choices and complete required reasoning component of the assignment.

Cognitive: “But on tasks that require more complex memory skills, [students’] performance is more limited” (Snowman and Biehler, page 82). This assignment does not require students to utilize complex memory skills, such as those used in during test-taking, so it will less likely frustrate or overwhelm them.

Emotional: “…School failure may lead to delinquent behavior” (Snowman and Biehler, page 81). Because of the very nature of problem-based learning, there is a lesser likelihood of students viewing themselves as failures because PBL assignments have no right or wrong answer. As long as students can justify the decisions they made and their response to the assignment, then they can be considered a success. This will decrease the likelihood of delinquent behavior happening.

Learning Outcomes, Student Role and Problem Situation,

Meet the Problem Method
Primary: Language Arts

Benchmark LA.A.1.2.1: The student uses a table of contents, index, headings, captions, illustrations, and major words to anticipate or predict content and purpose of a reading selection.

Learning Outcome: After class discussions about book components and reading the “Meet the Problem” documents, the student will analyze five books to determine if the books should be considered as part of the Top Five Historical Fiction Books List and will explain in three sentences per book how he/she came to his/her determination. The student must score at least a “satisfactory” on all dimensions of the related rubric. (Analysis)
Benchmark LA.A.2.2.2: The student identifies the author’s purpose in a simple text.

Learning Outcome: After studying a PBL resource (TBD later), the student will choose two books to read and then evaluate their literary quality based on the list of characteristics of quality literature described in a PBL resource. The student will complete a 200-word book report for each book delineated his/her evaluation and must score at least a “satisfactory” on all dimensions of the book report rubric. (Evaluation)
Secondary: Social Studies

Benchmark SS.A.1.2.1: The student understands how individuals, ideas, decisions, and events can influence history.

Learning Outcome: With other group members, the student will compile and categorize a list of the seven most significant periods/events in history and will list three ways each period/event affected people. The student will utilize this list as a guideline for choosing the top five historical fiction books. The student must score at least a “satisfactory” on all dimensions of the historical periods/events rubric. (Synthesis and Evaluation)
Description of Student Roles and Problem Situation
The elementary school principal has decided that the fifth-grade students can only read five historical fiction books. She has appointed a Book Review Board to select these books. The board must pick the best five books that every fifth-grade student must read and enjoy.

Students will assume the roles of the Book Review Board members. The board is composed of one history teacher, one language arts teacher, one parent, and one student. A decision must be made in time for the next school year. Once the board has made its selections, members must present the book list to the principal and justify their choices.



Meet the Problem” Method

Students will be introduced to this PBL activity via the attached “Meet the Problem” document.




EMAIL
From: Superintendent John Stingy Sent: Mon 9/3/2007 9:29 AM
To: Principal Natalie Davis
CC: All Teachers
Subject: Reading Restriction

Dear Principal Davis,


It seems as we get further into the 21st century there is less and less time to accomplish the goals we have set for ourselves. There is so much that we have to teach the students in our schools that soon they will be doing nothing but eating, sleeping, and studying! In order to help our poor students, I am placing a reading restriction on the number of books that our students can read.
For fifth grade students, I only want them to read the five very best historical fiction books in the world. These books should be high quality literature. I don’t care about what time periods or historical events in which the books’ plots take place, but they should be important periods or events in history. Choose a Book Review Board of four members composed of a history teacher, a language arts teacher, a parent of a student, and a fifth grade student.
I need the list of books from you before next school year starts in August of 2008.
If you go to www.amazon.com and search for children’s historical fiction books, a good list comes. You could use it to help you get started. Here is the direct link to it: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_n_10/103-7073706-2619850?ie=UTF8&rs=4&rh=n%3A1000%2Cn%3A4%2Cn%3A2917
Thanks and good luck!
Sincerely,

John Stingy

Superintendent




Problem Statement
How can we, as the Book Review Board, choose the best five books for fifth grade students to read in such a way that

  • the books fit into the historical fiction genre?

  • there are only five books chosen?

  • the books are examples of high quality literature?

  • the books are considered fun and enjoyable to read by fifth graders

  • the books are at an appropriate reading level for fifth graders?

  • the books cover a wide span of history?

  • we meet the deadline given by the Superintendent?


Know/Need to Know Board


Know

Need to Know

  • The books must be for the 5th grade reading level.

  • The books must be historical fiction.

  • The books’ plots can take place during any time in history.

  • The books must be fit the qualifications for a history teacher, a language arts teacher, a parent, and a 5th grader.

  • How does a book get to be classified as historical fiction?

  • What are the characteristics of a historical fiction book?

  • What are characteristics of good literature?

  • What are some examples of good literature?

  • How do you quickly determine what a book is like and about?

  • What are the most important aspects of a book/novel?

  • What are some examples of historical fiction books written for children?

  • Are there any famous historical fiction children’s authors? If so, who?

  • What has happened in history that has had major impacts on people?

  • What are the characteristics of a historical event/period that has had a “major impact” on people?

  • How far back in history should the books cover?

  • Do all books have to be from different time periods/events?

  • Do the books have to cover US history, world history, or both?



Resources
Print Materials
Kingfisher, Editors of. The Kingfisher Encyclopedia of History. Massachusetts: Kingfisher, 2004.
Silver, Donald and Patricia Wynne. Interactive 3-D Maps: American History. Teaching Resources: 2005.
Grant, Neil. Oxford Children’s History of the World. London: Oxford University Press, 2006.
Non-Print Materials

Avi. Children’s historical fiction author. Class speaker.


Secret Lives: Hidden Children and their Rescuers during WWII. Directed by Aviva Slesin. 2004. (DVD)
Internet Sources
Jefferson Cup – FCPL. http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/library/READING/YA/JEFFCUP.HTM

* list of historical fiction books for young readers that have won the Jefferson Cup award


Mary Smoffat. http://www.marysmoffat.co.uk/bibliography/cont.htm

* list of historical fiction children’s books categorized by historical time period/event


Why & How I Teach with Historical Fiction. http://teacher.scholastic.com/lessonrepro/lessonplans/instructor/social1.htm#tips

* criteria for what makes a good historical fiction book and list of good historical fiction books



Capstone Performance

Primary: Language Arts

Benchmark LA.A.1.2.1: The student uses a table of contents, index, headings, captions, illustrations, and major words to anticipate or predict content and purpose of a reading selection.

Learning Outcome: After class discussions about book components and reading the “Meet the Problem” documents, the student will analyze five books to determine if the books should be considered as part of the Top Five Historical Fiction Books List and will explain in three sentences per book how he/she came to his/her determination. The student must score at least a “satisfactory” on all dimensions of the related rubric. (Analysis)
Benchmark LA.A.2.2.2: The student identifies the author’s purpose in a simple text.

Learning Outcome: After studying a PBL resource (TBD later), the student will choose two books to read and then evaluate their literary quality based on the list of characteristics of quality literature described in a PBL resource. The student will complete a 200-word book report for each book delineated his/her evaluation and must score at least a “satisfactory” on all dimensions of the book report rubric. (Evaluation)
Secondary: Social Studies

Benchmark SS.A.1.2.1: The student understands how individuals, ideas, decisions, and events can influence history.

Learning Outcome: With other group members, the student will compile and categorize a list of the seven most significant periods/events in history and will list three ways each period/event affected people. The student will utilize this list as a guideline for choosing the top five historical fiction books. The student must score at least a “satisfactory” on all dimensions of the historical periods/events rubric. (Synthesis and Evaluation)
Capstone Performance – Solution
Problem Statement:

How can we, as the Book Review Board, choose the best five books for fifth grade students to read in such a way that:



  • the books fit into the historical fiction genre?

  • there are only five books chosen?

  • the books are examples of high quality literature?

  • the books are considered fun and enjoyable to read by fifth graders

  • the books are at an appropriate reading level for fifth graders?

  • the books cover a wide span of history?

  • we meet the deadline given by the Superintendent?


How Students Present Their Solutions to the Problem:

In order to make the day of the presentations more realistic to the problem scenario, the class will listen to student presentations in a large conference room in the school. The actual principal of the school will be present to play the role of the principal in the PBL activity. She will sit at one end of the table in the conference room (while other students are sitting around the walls as audience members) and the presenting students will sit at the other to present their solution.

Students will bring in copies or pictures of the books they have chosen. Since this assignment allows them to choose the method for their presentation, they may utilize PowerPoint on a computer, a white/chalk board, or other resources. These resources will be present in the conference room for the day of solution-presenting. The book review boards will have 10-15 minutes to present their recommendations for historical fiction books to the principal.

Once everyone has arrived in the conference room, everyone immediately assumes their character roles. After setting up the resources need to present their solution, the students presenting will exit the conference room. Students observing, the teacher, and the principal will be waiting in the conference room. The book review board will knock on the door, enter the room, and will be greeted by the principal as members of the board. They will bring in their materials, such as the books and any handouts to give to the principal. Then they will begin their presentation of the solution. Students observing and the teacher will play the roles of invisible background observers.

The presenting students will dress in business attire since this meeting is an official meeting of business. They will be required to present their recommended top five historical fiction books and they must justify each choice with at least five reasons. They must also present at least two alternatives to their top five, in case the principal does not like any of their recommendations. They must explain why the two alternatives were not part of the top five but are good enough to be included as alternatives. Two reasons must be given per book why each alternative is an alternative and not a top five recommendation.

When presenting, each member of the book review board must contribute in the presentation of their recommendations. Each student must play one of the specified roles described in the “Meet the Problem” document, and all roles must be shared during the presentation. Each student playing a role must explain from their role’s perspective why they agree with the recommendation for each book. For example, the student playing the role of a history teacher must explain to the principal why he/she is in agreement with the rest of the book review board that Book One is recommended as a top five historical fiction book for fifth graders.



This capstone performance is related to the learning outcomes in several ways. First, in order to actually choose the books, students must use different book elements to learn and understand the plot, setting, characters, and significance of the book. The fact that they have chosen certain books based on specific reasons will demonstrate that they are capable of using book elements to “anticipate or predict content and purpose of a reading selection” (Benchmark LA.A.1.2.1). Second, after reading and choosing the top five recommendations for historical fiction for fifth graders, they will be able to explain to the principal (and thus the teacher) the author’s purpose thus providing an affirmative reason for their selection of each book. This meets the learning outcome for Benchmark LA.A.2.2.2. Third, as part of their presentation of their recommendations to the principal, students must explain the reasons for choosing books in which the setting occurs during certain historical time periods/events and why fifth graders should read books that happen during these times/events. This meets the learning outcome for Benchmark SS.A.1.2.1.

Rubric for Assessing the Capstone Performance
The following rubric is a guideline for parents and the teacher to understand the expectations of the PBL assignment. Students will be given a rubric written in language appropriate for fifth graders.



Component

Superior

Adequate

Unacceptable

Quality of Solution & Reasoning

50

35

RESUBMIT

Student chooses five historical fiction books that meet quality literature standards established in class. Student shares five reasons for selection in top five list per book. Explanation of reasoning includes all of the following: knowledge about author’s purpose, plot, setting, characters, and moral lessons; why fifth graders will enjoy reading recommended books; why parents will approve of recommendations; why each historical period/event was chosen as a significant period/event. Reasoning is logical based on class lessons.

Student chooses five historical fiction books that meet quality literature standards established in class. Student shares less than five reasons for selection in top five list per book. Explanation of reasoning does not includes all of the following: knowledge about author’s purpose, plot, setting, characters, and moral lessons; why fifth graders will enjoy reading recommended books; why parents will approve of recommendations; why each historical period/event was chosen as a significant period/event. Reasoning is logical based on class lessons.

Student chooses less than five historical fiction books.

OR

Books chosen are not historical fiction.



OR

Student shares three or less reasons for selection in top five list per book.

OR

Explanation of reasoning includes less than half of the following: knowledge about author’s purpose, plot, setting, characters, and moral lessons; why fifth graders will enjoy reading recommended books; why parents will approve of recommendations; why each historical period/event was chosen as a significant period/event. Reasoning is illogical and not based on class lessons.



Alternatives

15

10

RESUBMIT

Student shares at least two books that serve as alternatives to the top five they chose. Student explains why the two alternatives were not part of the top five but are good enough to be included as alternatives. Two reasons are given per alternative book.

Student shares only one book that serves as an alternative.

OR

Student doesn’t explain why the two alternatives were not part of the top five but are good enough to be included as alternatives.



OR

One reason is given per alternative book.



Student does not share any alternatives.

OR

Student does not explain why alternatives were selected.



Method of Presentation

15

11

5

Student chooses and creates appropriate method for presentation with group members that meet all of the following criteria: the method is easy to see and understand, covers pertinent material, relates to presentation, is visually eye-catching, and does not overpower the presentation. Choices for methods may include (but are not limited to) PowerPoint presentations, posters, handouts (enough for the entire class), videos, drawing on a white/chalk board, etc.

Student stays within alloted time limit of 10-15 minutes for presentation.



Student chooses and creates method for presentation that meets at least 3 of the criteria listed in the Superior category.

Student is under or over the alloted time limit by no more than 2 minutes.



Student chooses and creates method for presentation that meets 2 or less of the criteria listed in the Superior category.

Student is under or over the alloted time limit by more than 2 minutes.



Presentation & Materials

10

7

4

Student follows presentation day agenda and directions and stays in role playing mode throughout entire presentation.

Student assists group in providing materials for presentation by bringing copies or pictures of recommended books. Pictures or copies of all five books are present at the presentation.



Student does only one of the following: follows presentation day agenda and directions or stays in role playing mode throughout entire presentation.Student assists group in providing materials for presentation by bringing copies or pictures of recommended books. Pictures or copies of four or three books are present at the presentation.

Student does not follow presentation day agenda or directions and does not stay in role playing mode.

OR

Student does not assist group in providing materials for presentation by bringing copies or pictures of recommended books. Pictures or copies of two or less books are present at the presentation.



Appearance

* Parents may make arrangements with the teacher for their child to be excused from dressing up if the parent presents a valid reason (example: financial restrictions) to the teacher before the day of the presentations.




10

7

0

Student is dressed in professional business attire (that is, no jeans, flip flops, sandals, shorts, caps, t-shirts) meaning church attire or dresses or skirts and dress pants with shirts tucked in. Hair is neatly combed and fixed.

Student is partly dressed in professional business attire, for example, a dress with flip flops or dress pants with a t-shirt.

Student is not dressed in professional business attire.

TOTAL POINTS

100

70

RESUBMIT

* Students may lose points at any time during presentations if they cause disruptions while groups are presenting.


Grading Scale

Points

Grade

100-90

A

89-80

B

79-70

C

69-60

D

59-0

F

Students who receive a D or below are strongly encouraged to resubmit their work to earn a better grade.



Two Alternative Solutions and “Best” Solution Analysis
Problem Statement:

How can we, as the Book Review Board, choose the best five books for fifth grade students to read in such a way that:



  • the books fit into the historical fiction genre?

  • there are only five books chosen?

  • the books are examples of high quality literature?

  • the books are considered fun and enjoyable to read by fifth graders

  • the books are at an appropriate reading level for fifth graders?

  • the books cover a wide span of history?

  • we meet the deadline given by the Superintendent?


Best Solution

Students would receive a superior rating if their solution was similar to the following. This solution is a better choice than the alternative because it places equal importance on the literary quality of the book selections and on the historical periods covered. Even though the books aren’t as popular as the ones listed in the alternative solution, they more closely align to the rubric requirements. Also, the best solution lists more aspects that qualify books are quality literature so the answer is more well-rounded. The same goes for the historical period reasoning in solution one. It is more specific and covers a wider range of history.


Student Response:

As the Book Review Board, our recommendations are based on the following aspects that would qualify the books as quality literature:



  • author’s purpose is to inform and entertain

  • vocabulary is varied and colorful

  • plot is realistic and engaging

  • descriptions of setting and characters aligns with historical period/event during which plot takes place

  • plot is enjoyable

  • plot, setting, and/or characters teach reader about what life was like during that time in history

  • plot/content is appropriate for fifth grade students

The important time periods in history to cover are:



  • one of the World Wars

  • Civil War

  • Revolutionary War

  • Great Depression.

These historical events all greatly impacted the US and people’s ways of life.
Our Recommendations
1. Fires of Jubilee by Alison Hart (Civil War)

2. Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis (Great Depression)

3. Summer of my German Soldier by Bette Greene (WWII)

4. George Washington’s Socks by Elvira Woodruff (1776)

5. Lily’s Crossing by Patricia Reilly Giff (WWII)


Pros

Cons

History periods covered is varied.

WWII historical period is covered in two of the five books.

All of the books are accelerated reader books.

Not all of the books are award winners

The selections all evoke different feelings: humor, sadness, adventure, bravery, fear, happiness, etc.

Not many of the books are considered children’s classics.

All books offer the opportunity to live in the shoes of someone in that particular time period.

Some of the books could be viewed as depressing.

Consequences: Because there are two books that have settings in World War II, which could be viewed as limiting the opportunity to read about other historical time periods/events. Not all important historical events are covered in this selection. However, the books’ literary quality is excellent and all are popular children’s books that kids will enjoy reading.


Alternative Solution

Students would receive a superior or adequate rating if their solution was similar to the following.


As the Book Review Board, our recommendations are based on the following aspects that would qualify the books as quality literature:

  • vocabulary is varied and colorful

  • plot is realistic and engaging

  • descriptions of setting and characters aligns with historical period/event during which plot takes place

  • plot, setting, and/or characters teach reader about what life was like during that time in history

  • plot/content is appropriate for fifth grade students

The important time periods in history to cover are:



  • 1800s

  • 1900s

We decided each century is equally important to cover to adequately cover a large portion of history, especially the part where in the USA is in existence.
Our Recommendations
1. Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko (1935)

2. Kira Kira by Cynthia Kadohata (1950s)

3. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry (1943)

4. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor (1930s)

5. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder (Civil War)


Pros

Cons

Many of the selections are considered children’s classics.

The time periods covered aren’t as varied.

All of the books are accelerated reader books.

The reading levels are varied and some students may not be able to read them comfortably.

The selections all evoke different feelings: humor, sadness, adventure, bravery, fear, happiness, etc.

The majority of selections are from a female perspective which may not appeal to boys.

All books are award winners.

Some important historical events are left out.

Consequences: Not all important historical events are covered in this selection. The time selections are very limited. However, almost all the books are books that have been read by children for many years and are guaranteed excellent reads and students will enjoy them.



Debriefing Plan and Coaching Questions
Review of Student Generated Solutions

The whole class will listen to student presentations in a large conference room in the school. The principal of the school will play the role of herself and will sit on one side of a conference room table. Presenting students will sit on the other side of the conference table. The rest of the students not currently presenting their solution will sit around the walls as audience members behind the principal so that they can see the present students present their solutions and see their visual aids.


Rating of Solutions

Before the presentations of solutions begin, all students in the whole class with collaborate in a group discussion to determine the criteria for a rubric to be used by students for rating solutions during presentations. Students will identify which criteria are most important, the point scale, and value of each criteria component. This discussion will be guided by the teacher. The teacher will ensure that students include the following in their rubrics: presentation skills (eye contact, voice projection), organization (smooth transitions from speaker to speaker, presentation materials are orderly), professionalism (students are dressed up and act appropriately), content (books are examples of quality literature, all books are historical fiction), etc.

On presentation day, each student in the audience will be given the scoring rubric which they will use to rate the solution presented by each group. Each student will justify his/her point selection by explaining why he/she did not score the component one point higher or one point lower.

Then, all the rubrics from the students of each group will be averaged and the average graphed on a large piece of paper. After all groups have presented their solutions, the graphs of averaged points will be considered and the class will decide, based on the graphed points, which solution was best out of the whole class. The group with the best solution will be bestowed the honorable title of “Best Solution” and will be mentioned in the class newsletter.


Required Coaching at End of Debriefing Session

The following five concepts must arise for content accuracy. First, students must demonstrate an understanding of what constitutes a significant historical event/period. The teacher is simply looking for a response that basically states that the event/period majorly affected the lifestyle or living habits of people on a permanent basis. Second, students must understand what constitutes quality literature. They must include descriptive language, interesting plot, realistic story, realistic characters, accurately representative setting, or other elements. Third, students must identify what the author’s purpose is in each novel they choose to read and summarize. Fourth, they must demonstrate that they understood how to utilize different elements of the book in order to choose it to read as a prospect for their top five list. And finally, students must correctly describe the historical events with as much accurate information as possible. For example, a student that confuses the events of World War I with World War II has not demonstrated that they understand the difference between the two events.



In order to ensure that these concepts are covered by students, the teacher will use the following questions outlined below.


Coaching Questions Throughout the Lesson


Question

Cognition

Metacognition

Epistemic Cognition

Meet the Problem

What should be your goal with this assignment?

What are some possible ways to reach your goal?

In what areas do you think you will grow from reaching the goal?

Know/Need to Know Board

How many items do you think you should have on each side of the board?

Why are you choosing some of the “need to know” items?

Do you need to find out all the “need to know” items?

Problem Statement

Have you included all necessary components in your problem statement?

Would your problem statement change if your role changed?

In what ways do meeting all the requirements of the problem statement make the assignment more challenging?

Research

What resources have been most valuable?

Has it been necessary to use all the resources you initially planned to? Why or why not?

Is the doing to research easier to do from the role you’re playing or would it be easier to have a different role?

Generating Possible Solutions

How do you think your solution will differ from other groups’?

How do you think your approach to solving the problem is different from other groups?

Why did you choose to approach the problem solving this way? Has this made learning the material easier for you? Why or why not?


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