Prepared by Michael Jean Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries May 2013 table of contents



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Northern Territory

Primary Industry and Fisheries

Overview and Outlook

2012





Prepared by

Michael Jean

Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries

May 2013


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Primary Industries Profile 3

Fisheries Group Profile 3

Livestock (Cattle) 12

Interstate Cattle Movements 13

Live Cattle Exports 14

Other Livestock Industries 15

Horticulture 18

Fruit 19


Vegetables 20

Field Crops 21

Forestry 21

Fisheries 22


Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries


The Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries (DPI&F) is the government agency responsible for facilitating industry development in three vital economic sectors, facilitating optimal use of the Territory's primary industry and fishery resources. The combined value of Territory rural and fishing sectors exceeds $500 million a year, accounting for nearly 2% of Gross State Product (GSP). Mining is the giant of Territory resource industries, grossing an annual $3.0 billion, contributing 20% of GSP.

The primary aim of the Department is to work with its partners to stimulate and sustain economic growth for the whole community by promoting sustainable and productive farming, sustainable use of fish resources.

The industries the Department services impact on the economic and social well-being of thousands of owners, managers, employees, service people and families in urban and rural communities, across all Territory regions and climatic zones.

The department's multi-skilled specialist team of scientists, researchers, technicians, extension officers and support staff, have used vision and commitment to help put the Territory on the world map in terms of research, development, production and supply of our diverse resources.


Primary Industries Profile


The Primary Industry Group delivers strategic services that support profitable and sustainable primary production.

It works in partnership with producers, industry bodies, community groups and related agencies to promote industry growth and ensure access to markets for animals, plants and plant products. This includes the pastoral, agricultural and horticultural sectors.

The main services are:

Inspection, treatment and certification services for animals and animal products;

Inspection, treatment and certification services for plant and plant products;

Research and extension programs to help producers sustainably lift crop and stock yields and capacity;

Development of best-practice farming methods for specific environments;

Indigenous pastoral and horticultural economic development;

Biosecurity and laboratory diagnostic services for plant and animal health; and

Monitoring of, and response to, emergency and endemic animal and plant pests and disease.


Fisheries Group Profile


The Fisheries Group works in partnership with commercial and recreational fishing industries, the aquaculture industry, Indigenous communities and other stakeholders to achieve optimum sustainable utilisation of the Territory’s valuable aquatic resources. It follows a consultative and precautionary-based approach to ensure that all Territory wild harvest fisheries, aquaculture and associated aquatic resources are ecologically, economically and socially sustained. Fisheries’ resource management programs are based on high quality scientific indicators and designed to ensure that the Territory’s aquatic resources are not over-exploited.

Services include:

Facilitating the sustainable commercial catch, sale and processing of fish and aquatic life through license allocation;

Encouraging industry development;

Supporting the recreational fishing industries;

Preventing the introduction of aquatic pests into the Territory;

Contributing to the research needs for each territory fishery;

Working in partnership to address the needs of the aquaculture industry;

Operating the commercial barramundi hatchery/nursery business;

Assisting Indigenous communities in relation to fishing issues; and providing education resources for schools and delivering community education.


Economic Overview of the NT: Facts and Figures


Table 1: NT Economy

Gross State Product ($m)

$18,061

(2011-12)

Population (persons)

236,300

Sept Qtr 2012

Exports ($m)

$5,278

(2011-12)

Imports ($m)

$4,154

(2011-12)

Unemployment rate

4.3%

June 2012

Inflation rate (national)

2.1%

(2011-12)

Average weekly full time adult earnings persons)

$1,443

(2011-12)

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

The NT economy is forecast to continue grow in 2011-12 and 2012-13 as the world economy continues to recover despite the on-going European Debt Crisis.

These forecasts include the impact of the $34 billion Inpex LNG Project on the NT economy.

Figure 1: Northern Territory Economic Outlook - Gross State Product 1998-99 to 2016-17



Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2011-12 & Deloitte Access Economics Economic Growth Forecasts December Quarter 2012, f = forecast

Figure 2: Agricultural and Fishing Areas in the Northern Territory


NT Primary Industry and Fisheries – An Overview


The rural and fisheries industries in the Territory include cattle (interstate and live export), other livestock (buffalo, crocodiles, and goats), horticulture (fruit, vegetables, nursery and cut flowers) and mixed farming (field crops, hay and seeds, and forestry).

The fisheries industry comprises harvesting of wild catch (including the Northern Prawn Fleet) and aquaculture. A substantial recreational fishing sector generates tourism activity and provides lifestyle amenity.

The relative contribution of each industry to the rural and fisheries total is illustrated in Figure 3, with the cattle, fisheries and horticulture industries being the major players.

Figure 3: Contribution of Industry to Sector Production Value, 2011-12

figure 3: contribution of industry to sector production value, 2011-12

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2010-11

Rural and fisheries industries have significant links to other sectors of the Territory economy such as manufacturing, transport and storage, retail and wholesale trade. These industries are vital in regional areas, providing economic stimulus and employment for approximately 3,400 people in 2011-12 (ABS).

They also account for a significant proportion of the Territory's non-mineral export revenue. Territory rural industries and fisheries accounted for 2.7% of Gross State Product (GSP) in 2011-12, above the national proportion (Table 2). Exports of Territory rural and fisheries produce are dominated by live cattle exports (mainly to Indonesia), fisheries and to a lesser extent agriculture services.

Table 2: Agriculture and Fisheries Contribution to Northern Territory GSP 2011-12

2011-12

% Contribution to GSP

Tasmania

7.3%

South Australia

5.7%

Northern Territory

2.7%

Queensland

2.7%

Victoria

2.5%

New South Wales

1.7%

Western Australia

1.6%

Australian Capital Territory

0.1%

Australia (% of GDP)

2.4%

Source: ABS, Australian National Accounts, Cat No. 5220.0, 2011-12

Industry Overview


Agriculture, forestry and fishing industries businesses are structured in one of the following ways:

Non-employing sole trader/owner-operator

Micro fewer than 5 employees

Small 5 to 19 employees

Medium 20 to 200 employees

Large 200-plus employees

There were 1,033 business counted for the period 2007-2011. The sole trader/owner-operator is the most common form of business structure (74%) while at the other end of the scale there are no large firms (200 plus employees) in the sector (see Figure 4).

Figure 4: Agriculture Forestry and Fishing Industries: Number of business by firm structure



Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics Counts of Australian Businesses, including Entries and Exits, Cat No. 8165.0, June 2007 to June 2011.

In 2011-12, the total value of rural industries and fisheries production is estimated at


$533.4 million, an increase of 10.5% over the previous year (see Figure 5). Table 3 represents the data used in Figure 5 in tabular form.

The increase is due to a rise in the production value of cattle increased by 0.2% to $325.8 million.

There was a 43.0% rise in the value of horticulture production to $198.4 million.

A doubling in other livestock production (mainly crocodile production) to $22.5 million.

The production value of fisheries increase by 4.7% to $80.2 million driven by the Northern Prawn Fleet catch.

These increases were offset by a fall in the mixed farming fell 22.9% to $14.6 million. Production values are driven predominantly by hay/fodder production that supports live cattle exports.



Figure 5: Primary Industry and Fisheries Outlook: Value of Production

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2001-02 to 2016-17, f = forecast

Table 3: Primary Industry and Fisheries Outlook Production – 2000-01 to 2011-12 ($m)

Year

Cattle

$m

Horticulture

$m

Fisheries

$m

Other

Livestock

$m

Mixed

Farming

$m

Total

$m

2000-01

169.5

91.7

142.1

18.0

6.9

428.1

2001-02

167.9

92.2

102.3

13.1

6.6

382.1

2002-03

218.9

85.2

105.6

14.8

11.0

435.5

2003-04

279.2

87.5

116.6

10.5

9.4

503.2

2004-05

270.9

98.6

102.5

9.7

12.0

493.7

2005-06

212.7

95.6

106.0

7.1

15.4

436.7

2006-07

215.9

145.1

94.0

10.0

18.9

483.9

2007-08

338.7

96.4

98.0

9.6

14.7

557.5

2008-09

275.0

99.3

72.8

10.1

18.2

475.4

2009-10

264.4

117.7

83.3

9.3

16.7

491.4

2010-11

325.2

138.7

76.6

10.7

19.0

570.2

2011-12

325.8

198.4

80.2

22.5

14.6

641.5

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2011-12

NT Primary Industry and Fisheries Performance


Figure 6: Current Year Performance of Northern Territory Commodities



Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2010-11 to 2011-12.

NPF Crustaceans = Commonwealth administered Prawn Fishery

NT Primary Industry and Fisheries Outlook


In the short and medium term, the NT agriculture and fisheries sectors are forecast to continue to expand production values (see Table 4).

NT agriculture and fisheries sectors are forecast to reach almost $700.0 million in production value by 2016-17.



Table 4: Primary Industry and Fisheries Outlook Production 2012-13 to 2016-17 ($m)

Year

Cattle

$m

Horticulture

$m

Fisheries

$m

Other

Livestock

$m

Mixed

Farming

$m

Total

$m

2012-13f

334.2

216.8

72.0

22.9

13.0

658.8

2013-14f

347.6

162.6

74.4

23.6

13.4

621.7

2014-15f

361.6

167.5

76.9

24.3

13.8

644.1

2015-16f

376.1

172.5

78.8

25.1

14.2

666.7

2016-17f

391.3

177.7

81.3

25.9

14.6

690.8

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2015-16, f = forecast

Significant value will be derived from the Territory’s interstate commodity movements that are offset by reduced live cattle exports to Indonesia due to the enforcement of its weight restriction, horticultural production (namely melons and mangoes for interstate markets) and the wild catch from the Northern Prawn Fleet. The outlook for these commodities is positive.

Mixed farming, in particular hay and fodder production will continue to grow as NT Live cattle exports to Indonesia and Philippines increase while new markets like Vietnam are established.

The Other Livestock outlook remains positive driven mainly by the demand for premium crocodile skins as the global economy recovers.


Industry Multipliers to the NT Economy


Table 5: Output Multipliers by Industry for the NT Economy 2011-12

Industry

Output Value

Output Value created in the




by industry

rest of the NT economy

Beef cattle

$1,000,000

$510,000

Other Agriculture

$1,000,000

$480,000

Horticulture

$1,000,000

$510,000

Commercial fishing

$1,000,000

$400,000

Note: Output created in the rest of NT economy excludes the mentioned industry

Note: Other Agriculture includes Other Livestock and Mixed Farming

Source: Department of Business and Employment 2006-07

Table 6: Dollar value of Output Multipliers by Industry for the NT Economy 2011-12

Industry

Output Value

Output Value created in the




by industry 2011-12 ($m)

rest of the NT economy 2011-12 ($m)

Beef cattle

$325.8

$166.1

Other Agriculture

$37.1

$17.8

Horticulture

$198.4

$101.2

Commercial fishing

$80.2

$32.1

Note: Output in the rest of NT economy excludes the mentioned industry

Note: Other Agriculture includes Other Livestock and Mixed Farming

Source: Department of Business and Employment 2006-07

Table 7: Employment Multipliers by Industry for the NT Economy 2011-12

Industry

For every Industry

Jobs created in the

per 100 Jobs

Jobs

rest of the NT economy

Beef cattle

100

36

Other Agriculture

100

97

Horticulture

100

51

Commercial fishing

100

57

Note: Jobs in the rest of NT economy excludes the mentioned industry

Note: Other Agriculture includes Other Livestock and Mixed Farming

Source: Department of Business and Employment 2006-07

NT Primary Industry Sectors

Livestock (Cattle)


The live cattle export trade (mainly Indonesian) and the sale of cattle in the interstate markets (mostly Queensland and South Australia) dominates agricultural and fisheries production in the Territory. The pastoral industry is a major contributor to incomes in regional areas of the Territory. It also provides considerable flow-on benefits to other industries, particularly transport and storage, business to business services, and retail trade services.

Figure 7: Northern Territory Cattle: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2016-17

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17f, f = forecast

Figure 8: Northern Territory Cattle Production Numbers 2000-01 to 2016-17

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17f, f = forecast

The pastoral industry contributed 53.4% of the total value of the Northern Territory rural industries and fisheries production in 2011-12.

The estimated value of production for the cattle industry was $325.8 million in 2011-12, 0.2% from the previous year (see Figure 7 and Table 3). In 2011-12, 623,008 head of NT cattle were sent overseas or interstate down 0.8% from 2010-11.

In 2011-12 the NT pastoral industry exported 266,120 head of live cattle, a 2.1% decrease on the previous year (see Figure 8). This result includes the two month ban on live exports. The on-going impacts of reduced Indonesian import quotas will occur in the 2012-13 reporting period.

During 2011-12 the NT pastoral industry sent 356,888 head of cattle interstate, which is a 0.2% decrease on 2011-12 (see Figure 8).

The Northern Territory cattle population in 2012 was approximately 2.0 million head, about 7% of the total Australian herd.

The estimated cattle population by NT pastoral district,

Alice Springs Pastoral District has 20%

Barkly Tablelands and Tennant Creek has 30%

Victoria River District and Katherine has 32%

Darwin, Elsey and Gulf have 18% of the total Territory herd.

Interstate Cattle Movements


The majority of cattle destined for interstate markets are feeder cattle for further growing (grass-fed and grain-fed) before slaughter and sale in the domestic and international markets such as Japan, South Korea, US, and Taiwan.

Figure 9: Northern Territory Interstate Cattle Movements: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2016-17



Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

The value of the total interstate movement of Territory cattle in 2011-12 was estimated at $169.5million, up 0.6% from the previous year.

A total of 356,888 head of Territory cattle were sent interstate in 2011-12, a 0.2% increase over the previous year.

Queensland was the main destination for Territory cattle in 2011-12, taking about 57.4% (204,933 head of cattle) of the total interstate movement of cattle. This represents an increase of 0.2% on the previous year.

67,504 head or 18.9% of total interstate movements were sent to South Australia, down 5.3% on the preceding year.

Western Australia took 8.4% (29,927 head of cattle) of total Territory cattle transferred interstate, up 40.4% on 2010-11.

54,524 head of cattle (15.3% of total interstate movements) went to other states (Vic & NSW), down 6.2% on 2010-11.

Live Cattle Exports


Territory live cattle exports in 2011-12 were estimated at $156.3 million, a 0.3% decrease over the previous period. This is a robust result for the live cattle export industry still experiencing the European debt crisis and a two month Indonesian trade suspension (Please note: the head of cattle here represents only Territory cattle shipped through the Port of Darwin).
In 2011-12, Territory cattle accounted for 46.0 % of the total Australian live cattle exports to all markets.

A total of 266,120 head of Territory cattle were exported to South East Asia, a 2.1% decrease over 2010-11.

Territory live cattle exports to South East Asia are expected to increase in the future but performance will depend critically on exchange rate movements, potentially Foot and Mouth Disease-free South American suppliers, to a lesser extent competition from the Asian subcontinent, and locally supplied substitutes such as fish and chicken.

Figure 10: Northern Territory Live Cattle Export Destinations: Value of Production


2000-01 to 2016-17


Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

Indonesia is the largest market for Territory live cattle exports, taking 83.2% of total NT live cattle exports out of the Port of Darwin in 2011-12.

NT cattle exports to Indonesia decreased by 12.0% to 221,284 head in 2011-12 valued at $127.9 million (down 11.1% on 2010-11). Territory cattle exporters continue to face weight restrictions and competition from low cost producers in South America as Indonesia (in late 2009) allowed the resumption of imports of Brazilian beef. The 2 month suspension of the live trade to Indonesian has also impacted on this year’s result. The subsequent changes to Indonesian import quotas will impact in the next reporting period.


  • Territory cattle exports to the Philippines doubled in 2011-12 to 23,885 head of cattle.

  • 4,919 head of cattle were exported to Brunei in 2011-12, representing 36.0% increase on the previous year.

  • In 2011-12, 8,067 cattle were exported to Malaysia up from 4,895 head of cattle in 2011-12, while Sarawak and Sabah imported 1,197 and 460 head of cattle respectively.

Figure 11: GDP Growth Forecasts for NT Live Cattle Export Major Destinations 2011-2017

Source: International Monetary Fund, World Economic Outlook Database, October 2012 f = forecast
The economies of the destination countries for live cattle exports are forecast to maintain positive GDP growth supporting strong domestic demand for Territory beef (see Figure 11). This is offset by the appreciating value of the Australian Dollar, competition from other beef producers, and local substitutes like fish and chicken.

Other Livestock Industries


Other Livestock is a category of industries in the Northern Territory which has historically included crocodiles, poultry, buffalo, horses, camels, deer, pigs and goats, exported overseas or moved to interstate markets.

Crocodiles are the largest industry classified in the Other Livestock grouping. Premium grade crocodile skins are highly sought after in Japan, France, Italy and Asian countries. Second and third grade skins are also exported, although a growing domestic demand is emerging. The by-products of flesh, feet, teeth and skulls are mainly sold on the domestic market.



Figure 12: Northern Territory Other Livestock: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2016-17



Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

Total Other Livestock (crocodiles, buffalo and goats) contributed 2.2% to the total value of Territory rural industries and fisheries production in 2011-12.

In 2011-12 the total value of production in Other Livestock doubled to an estimated $22.5 million up from $10.7million in 2010-11.

For 2011-12 the Territory’s crocodile industry is estimated at $21.1million, and accounted for 93.8% of the total value of production in Other Livestock industries.

Buffalo numbers fell 51.5% in 2011-12 to 1,046 head with an estimated value of production of $0.8 million.

94.1% of the buffalo turned off were exported live overseas with Brunei the largest importer (531 head), and Indonesia (453 head) There were 62 buffalo sent to interstate markets in 2011-12.

Horses, camels, and goats are classified in the “Other” category in Figure 12. The estimated value of production of Other Livestock in 2011-12 was $0.6 million.

Figure 13: Northern Territory Crocodile Production 2000-01 to 2016-17

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

In 2011-12 the Territory’s crocodile industry produced:

76,200 kilograms of flesh, up 17.5% from the previous year.

19,729 skins increased by 9.4% from 18,041 skins produced in 2010-11.

There were 20 live sales in 2011-12. Live sales” refers to individual animals that are sold as animals and not for production purposes.

The Territory’s crocodile industry has recovered from the impact of the global recession with a doubling of total production value for 2011-12 to $21.06 million. This is up from $8.8 million in 2010-11.


Horticulture


The Territory horticulture industry includes fruit, vegetables, nurseries and cut flowers. The value of Territory horticultural production (including nurseries and cut flowers) for 2010-11 was $198.4 million, an increase of around 43.0% compared to the previous year (see Figure 14 and Table 2). Horticulture contributed an estimated 30.9% of the total value of Territory rural industries and fisheries production in 2011-12.

DPI&F horticultural statistics are obtained on a calendar year basis which corresponds to the harvesting season. As such, horticultural production figures for the 2010 calendar year are referred to as the 2010-11 financial year.



Please note: For 2008, no horticultural statistics were collected from industry due to data collection problems. Estimates were calculated for 2008 and are based on 2007 data collected by the Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries.

Figure 14: Northern Territory Horticulture: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2016-17



Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

The main reason for the increase in the value of horticultural production in 2011 (2011-12) was a large rise in melon production and to a lesser extent mango (due to the biennial production cycle of mango trees) and banana output. The majority of Territory horticultural production is destined for interstate markets.

81.2% ($161.0 million) of total horticulture production is derived from fruit production. Mangoes and melons are the major wet crops grown in the Territory.

Vegetables contributed 10.4% ($20.7 million) to total horticulture output.

8.4% ($16.7 million) of total Territory horticulture production is attributed to nursery and cut flowers.

Fruit


The main fruits produced in the Territory include mango, table grapes, bananas and melons.

Fruit value of production was 62.7% higher in 2011-12 largely due to a major increase in mango and melons and to a lesser extent, table grapes and bananas.



Figure15: Northern Territory Fruit: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2016-17



Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

Mangoes value of production increased by 76.2% to $80.0 million in 2011-12.

Mango output rose by 89.6% to 33,750 tonnes.

In 2011-12 melons increased by 28.5% to $ 59.7 million on the previous year.

47,159 tonnes of melons were grown in 2011-12, down 19.0% on 2010-11 production.

Table grape production values were estimated at $6.5 million in 2011-12, up from $1.6 million in the previous period.

1485 tonnes of table grapes were produced in 2011-12, up 67.8% on the previous year.

In 2011-12 value of production of bananas increased to $11.4 million compared to $4.3 million in 2010-11.

In spite of the ongoing issue of Panama Disease for the Territory’s banana industry, output decreased by only 0.4% to 2,336 tonnes in 2011-12.

The production value of the Other Fruits category increased to $3.5 million in 2011-12 a rise from $1.2 million on 2010-11 results, as output rose from 462 tonnes in the previous year to 941 tonnes in 2011-12.


Vegetables


The major vegetables produced in the Territory include cucumber, bitter melon, okra snake beans and pumpkin.

Vegetable production was 13.5% higher in 2011-12 due to significant increase in other vegetable production. This is offset by falls in production of cucumber, bitter melon, okra, snake bean and pumpkin.



Figure 16: Northern Territory Vegetables: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2016-17



Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

Cucumber value of production decreased to an estimated $5.8 million in 2011-12 down from $7.6 million in the previous year.

Cucumber output decreased to 2,232 tonnes in 2010-11 from 2,601 tonnes in the last year.

In 2011-12 the value of production for Okra was estimated at $1.3 million, a fall from $4.1 million in 2009-10.

200 tonnes of Okra was produced in 2011-12, down by 29.7% in the previous year.

Bitter Melon production values were estimated at $1.1 million in 2011-12, a fall of 60.2% on the previous period.

200 tonnes of Bitter Melons were grown in 2011-12, down from 553 tonnes on last year.

In 2011-12 value of production of Snake Bean decreased 64.8% to $1.0 million compared to $2.9 million in 2010-11.

201 tonnes of Snake Bean were produced in 2011-12, a fall from 553 tonnes in the previous year.

Pumpkin production fell 8.5% to 5,423 tonnes from 5,924 tonnes in 2010-11 while value of production decrease 4.2% to $4.9 million in 2011-12.

The production value of the Other Vegetables category was $6.5 million in 2011-12 while output was 2,806 tonnes.

Field Crops


Mixed farming includes hay/fodder, pasture seed production, cereal crops (sorghum, maize etc.) and other crops such as sesame and soybeans.

Mixed farming contributed over 3.6% of the total value of Territory rural industries and fisheries production in 2011-12.

The value of field crop production in 2011-12 was $14.6 million, a 22.9% decrease from 2011-12.

Hay/fodder production accounted for 95.0% ($13.9 million) of the industries production values.

In 2011-12 there were increases in seed production valued at $0.7million.

Figure 17: Northern Territory Field Crops: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2014-15

Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast

Forestry


ABARES have reported in 2010–11, the total plantation area in the Northern Territory – Outback was approximately 15 900 hectares comprised of around 800 hectares of hardwood plantations and 15 100 hectares of other plantations.

Total sales and service income in the Northern Territory’s forest and wood product industry is estimated at around $69 million in 2010–11. Sales and service income from the wood product industry, which consists of structural woods and woodchips, was valued at around $45 million, and $24 million from paper and paper product sales. Northern Territory does not export any woodchips.

Source: Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry in the Outback region of the Northern Territory, 2013 ABARES

Fisheries


The Territory fishing industry encompasses the commercial, recreational and traditional Indigenous sectors. The commercial sector includes the harvesting of wild catch fisheries and aquaculture, as well as the processing, trade and retailing of seafood.

A review of Northern Prawn Fleet (NPF) data has seen NT Fisheries values adjust downwards as only the NT component of the NPF total catch is now counted. Previously the total NPF catch was counted.

This downward value trend (see Figure 18 and Table 4) is also reflected in Territory fisheries, with the total value of fishing production in 2010-11 increasing by 4.7% to $80.2 million, up from $76.6 million the previous year. This decrease is attributed mainly to the fall in aquaculture and molluscs & echinoderms production.

Fisheries contributed an estimated 14.8% of the total 2011-12 value of Territory rural industries and fisheries production value.

Fin fish production value is estimated at $25.7 million for 2011-12, an increase of 4.6% on the previous year.

The value of wild catch NT crustaceans production (wild catch crabs and other crustaceans) attributed to the Territory (excluding the Northern Prawn Fishery) decreased by an estimated 4.4% from $7.8 million in 2010-11 to an estimated $8.2 million in 2011-12.

In 2011-12 the value of the prawn catch by the Northern Pawn Fleet (Commonwealth managed Fishery) increased by 65.9% to $28.9 million.

Total aquaculture production value decreased by 35.5% to an estimated $17.2 million in 2011-12 up from $26.6 million for the previous year. This is primarily due to decreases in pearl and to a lesser extent algae/aquarium production. This was offset by increased barramundi production.

The value of molluscs and echinoderms was estimated at $187,648 in 2011-12, a 5% decrease on the previous year.

Figure 18: Northern Territory Fisheries: Value of Production 2000-01 to 2016-17



Source: Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 2000-01 to 2016-17, f = forecast. NPF = Northern Prawn Fleet

Northern Territory Major International Trading Partners


South East Asia (namely Indonesia) remains a significant destination for Live Cattle exports with Japan, South Korea, and to a lesser extent Taiwan and the US for interstate movement of NT cattle.

Other livestock is destined for South East Asian markets.

The economies in South East Asia and domestic markets within Australia are destinations for seafood and horticulture.

Figure 20: NT Trading Partners GDP Forecasts 2011-2017



Source: Source International Monetary Fund, World Economic Outlook Database, October 2012 f = forecast

Northern Territory International Trading Partners: Exchange Rates


In 2012 the Australia Dollar has been appreciating across some the major currencies (offset by moderating against other currencies) as demand for commodities continues, interest rates in Australia remain comparatively high, and buying the Australian Dollar as a safe haven due to on-going uncertainly in the global economy. A high Australia Dollar makes imported inputs for production cheaper but exports more expensive and less competitive.

Table 9 (1) & (2) & (3): Exchange Rates of Northern Territory’s International Trading Partners





Source: Reserve Bank of Australia March 2012 to February 2013


Publications


Information for Prospective Investors in Agricultural Enterprises in the Northern Territory

http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/p/pi/Agribro.pdf



DBE Annual Report 2010-11

http://www.nt.gov.au/dbe/corporate/annual_reports.html



Department of Resources Annual Report 2010-11

http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/p/AR/AR_1011.pdf

Fishery Status Reports 2009

http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/p/Fish_Rep/FR106.pdf



Northern Territory Rural Industries and Fisheries: Economic Outlook 2011

Northern Territory Rural Industries and Fisheries: Economic Outlook 2011


Useful Links


Australian Bureau of Statistics

http://www.abs.gov.au/


Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics

http://www.abare.gov.au/corporate/about_us/about.html

Department of Business and Employment

http://www.nt.gov.au/dbe/index.html

Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries

http://www.dpif.nt.gov.au

Northern Territory Agricultural Association

http://www.ntaga.org.au/

Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association

http://www.ntca.org.au/

Northern Territory Horticultural Association

http://www.ntha.com.au/



Reference Library – Economic Indicators (DBE)

http://www.nt.gov.au/dbe/economics.shtml#abs


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