Possible texts for some of the photos



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POSSIBLE TEXTS FOR SOME OF THE PHOTOS

(All taken from the exhibition texts)


gayanimals_NHM


The exhibition is housed in the Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, and runs from October 13 2006 to August 19 2007.
Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_entrance


From the entrance to the exhibition hall in the Natural History Museum in Oslo.
Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_entrance

These two swans are females, but stick together as a pair. Homosexual swans are known from many parts of the world. They often make a nest together and some raise families. A female couple may obtain eggs through one of them reproducing with a male. Females will sometimes lay eggs in a male couples nest for them to raise.
Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_whales


….
Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_topview


Homosexuality has been reported from more than 1500 animal species, and is well documented for 500 of them. The phenomenon is known from most vertebrate groups, insects, spiders, crustaceans, octopi and parasitic worms. The real extent of homosexuality among animals is probably much higher.
Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_penguin01-03


King penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus.

The frequency of homosexuality varies from species to species in the animal kingdom. In some species homosexuality has never been reported, while in other the whole species is bisexual. Based on numbers from other penguin species, more than one out of ten pairs of wild king penguins are two males or two females.


Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_library01-02


Homosexual mounting in tame animals have been seen as a result of an artificial environment and not a normal part of their biology. Thick-horn sheep (above the two geese), a close relative of tame sheep, lives in separate male and female flocks outside of breeding season. The males are sexually active all year. Homosexuality is a normal part of the species wild behaviour, the same is probably the case with tame sheep.
Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_wolfs

Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimals_amaz_delphins


In mammals, male and female sex organs are evolved to fit each other. Homosexual mammals have to find alternative ways of having sex. Their inventiveness is great! Monkeys often use their hands or have oral sex. The walrus frequently use their flippers. From dolphins we have examples of females riding each other dorsal fins and males using the blowhole!
Photo: Per E. Aas, Natural History Museum, University of Oslo

gayanimal_baboon


Sex is basically a way of passing on genes. Animals are govered by urges, the have sex because they want to, just like humans. The sexual urge is tied to the act however, not to the offspring. A number of animals masturbate – the easiest way to gratify their lust and urges.
Photo: Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo


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