Philosophy concentration



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PHILOSOPHY CONCENTRATION: The philosophy courses are designed to deepen and broaden the student's interest in and understanding of certain fundamental issues concerning the nature of existence, knowledge, and values. This involves critical reflection on the justification of basic human beliefs (e.g., free will, the existence of God) and analysis of the concepts in terms of which such beliefs are expressed. See course listings in order to determine the specific philosophy courses that are included in the University’s general education curriculum. While no philosophy course has a prerequisite, it is strongly recommended that students complete Philosophy 101 (Critical Thinking), or Philosophy 201 (Introduction to Philosophy), preferably both, before taking any 300 or 400 level philosophy course.

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL) (03)

PHIL-101. CRITICAL THINKING. 3:3:0

The course is designed to develop and refine students' ability to think more clearly and more logically. The means to this end is a study of elementary logic. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-105. CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES. * 3:3:0

A critical examination of such major current moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, pornography, retribution, and capital punishment, affirmative action and reverse discrimination, social and economic justice and ethical issues in agriculture and the environment. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-201. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. * 3:3:0

Topics typically include: the general goals and methods of philosophy, the existence of God, the problem of evil, the immortality of the soul, the meaning of life, and free will. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-202. ETHICS. * 3:3:0

Ethics is concerned primarily with the inquiry concerning various rules of conduct and "ways of life." Such fundamental ethical issues as egoism and altruism, freedom and determination, and the nature of moral decision-making will be highlighted through a critical examination of some of the writings of several classic ethical theorists, e.g., Plato, Mill, Kant, and Rawls. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-206. LOGIC. 3:3:0

A study of the methods and principles used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning, both deductive and inductive. Designed to help students reason more effectively themselves and to develop the ability to cogently criticize the reasoning of others. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-231 (331 AND 431). SELECTED TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 **

Information on the content of these offerings is available, prior to pre-registration, from philosophy faculty. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-300. HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0

The course covers classical philosophers starting in the sixth century B.C. through the Pre-Socratic period, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicureanism, stoicism, and skepticism ending with the second century A.D. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-302. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0

A study of the major European philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-304. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0

Political philosophy is concerned primarily with the nature of the concept of justice and its application in society. Some of the arguments that support particular forms of government, e. g., democratic, oligarchic, autocratic, etc., will be dealt with through a critical examination of several classic writers in the field, e. g., Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, Locke, and Rawls. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-322. BIOETHICS. 3:3:0

This course will be devoted to the critical examination of some of the most important ethical issues that arise in the field of biology and the life sciences, including: the moral responsibilities of health care professionals and the moral rights of patients, moral issues concerning human death and dying, moral issues concerning advances in biotechnology, and moral issues concerning medical research on humans and other animals. The consideration of these issues will be preceded by the laying of a foundation in normative ethical theory.



PHIL-341-PHILOSOPHY 341/MANAGEMENT 341: BUSINESS ETHICS. 3:3:0

This course will be devoted to an examination of some of the ethical issues that arise in the field of business. Specific topics to be considered include: business ethics and ethical theory, the moral status of corporations, ethical codes of conduct in business, truth and advertising, the rights and duties of employees, affirmative action, and environmental issues in business. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-399. INDEPENDENT STUDY 3:3:0

Qualified students, cooperation with a philosophy faculty member, may develop a course in some area of philosophy, which they wish to study in depth. Arrangements for such a course must be made by the end of the semester preceding the one in which the course is to be taken. Credit, three hours.



PHIL-407. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. 3:3:0

A study of some of the philosophical issues inherent in religious belief; e.g., the existence of God, the attributes of God, the nature of religious experience, revelation, faith, and the possibility of religious knowledge. Credit, three hours.



**Topics may include, for example, Human Nature, Philosophy of Art, Philosophy of Love, Contemporary Philosophy, Philosophy of History, Philosophy of Science, Eastern Philosophy, and African Philosophy.


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