Personal data: randy j. Sparks



Download 92.73 Kb.
Date conversion21.02.2016
Size92.73 Kb.

PERSONAL DATA:
RANDY J. SPARKS

Department of History

6823 St. Charles Ave.

Tulane University

New Orleans, LA  70118

504.862.8627 (Office)

504.862.8739 (FAX)

email: rsparks1@tulane.edu


RANK: Professor
DEPARTMENT: History
EDUCATIONAL RECORD:

Rice University, Houston, Texas. Ph.D., 1988. Dissertation: “A Mingled Yarn: Race and Religion in Mississippi, 1800-1876."

Mississippi State University, Department of History, M.A., 1982; B.A., 1979.
TEACHING EXPERIENCE:

Tulane University, Associate Professor, 2000-05, Full Professor, 2005-present.

Visiting Professor, École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Centre d’études nord-américaines, Paris, Fall 2005.

College of Charleston, Assistant Professor, 1989-95; Associate Professor, 1995-2000.

University of Georgia, Instructor, 1988-89.

Mississippi State University, Instructor, 1987-88, Teaching Assistant, 1980-82.


ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE:

Chair, Department of History, 2007-2010.


Director, Deep South Regional Humanities Center, 2003-05.
Co-Director and Co-Associate Director: Program in the Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World, College of Charleston (1994-2000).
PUBLICATIONS:
BOOKS, REFEREED, SOLE AUTHOR


  1. The Two Princes of Calabar: An Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Odyssey (Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2004).

Paperback edition, 2009.
German edition: Die Prinzen von Calabar: Eine atlantische Odyssee (Rogner & Bernhard, 2005).
French edition: Les deux Princes de Calabar: Une odyssée de 'esclavage transatlantique au 18 ème siècle (Paris: Les Perséides, 2006).
Contracted Arabic edition: Al Hiwar Athaqafi (Intercultural Dialogue) Publishers, Beirut.
2. Religion in Mississippi (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi for the Heritage of Mississippi Series, 2001).
3. On Jordan's Stormy Banks: Evangelical Religion in Mississippi, 1773-1876 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994).
BOOKS, REFEREED, CO-EDITOR
4. With Rosemary Brana-Shute, Paths to Freedom: Manumission in the Atlantic World (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2009).
5. With Bertrand Van Ruymbeke, Memory and Identity: Minority Survival Among the Huguenots in France and the Atlantic Diaspora (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2003).
6. With Jack P. Greene and Rosemary Brana-Shute, Money, Trade, and Power: The Evolution of Colonial South Carolina’s Plantation Society (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2001).
BOOKS, REFEREED, INVITED CONTRIBUTOR OF CHAPTER
7. “The Good Sisters: White Protestant Women and Institution Building in Antebellum Mississippi,” in Elizabeth Payne, Martha H. Swain, and Majorie J. Spruill, eds., Mississippi Women: Their Histories, Their Lives, Vol. 2 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2010).
8. “Women Professing Godliness”: Mary Fisher, Sophia Hume, and the Quakers of Colonial Charleston” in Marjorie J. Spruill and Valinda Littlefield, eds., South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2009).
9. “Religion in the Pre-Civil War South,” in John B. Boles, ed., A Companion to the American South (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers Ltd., 2001).

10. "’To Rend the Body of Christ’: Proslavery Ideology and Religious Schism from a Mississippi Perspective," in John R. McKivigan and Mitchell Snay, eds., Religion and the Antebellum Debate over Slavery (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1999).


11. "Biracial Churches in Amite County, Mississippi, 1800-1870," in John B. Boles, ed., Masters and Slaves in the House of the Lord: Race and Religion in the American South,1740-1870 (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1988).
REFEREED UNSOLICITED JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS
13. “‘An Anchor To the People’: Hurricane Katrina, Religious Life, and Recovery in New Orleans” in After the Storm: A Special Issue on Hurricane Katrina of the Journal of Southern Religion available at http://jsr.fsu.edu/Katrina/FrontKatrina.htm 2008).

14. “The Southern Way of Death: The Meaning of Death in Antebellum White Southern Evangelical Culture,” Southern Quarterly, XLIV (Fall 2006), 32-50.


15. “The Two Princes of Calabar: An Atlantic Odyssey from Slavery to Freedom,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Series, LIX (July 2002), 555-584.
16. "'The White People's Arms Are Longer Than Ours': Blacks, Education, and the American Missionary Association in Reconstruction Mississippi," Journal of Mississippi History, LIV (February 1992), 1-27.
17. "Gentleman's Sport: Horse Racing in Antebellum Charleston," South Carolina Historical Magazine, 93 (January 1992), 15-30.
18. "Mississippi's Apostle of Slavery: James Smylie and the Biblical Defense of Slavery," Journal of Mississippi History, 51 (May 1989): 89-106.
19. "Heavenly Houston or Hellish Houston? Black Unemployment and Relief Efforts, 1929-36," Southern Studies, XXV (Winter 1986): 353-66.
20. "John P. Osterhout: Yankee, Rebel, Republican," Southwestern Historical Quarterly, XC (October 1986): 111-38.
PAPERS PRESENTED:
“Preserving Cultural Heritage in a Post-Apocalyptic Society: New Orleans Mardi Gras after Katrina,” Katrina 2005 Workshop, Ecole des hautes études en sciences socials, Centre d’études nord-américaines, April 1, 2011.
“Preserving Cultural Heritage in a Post-Apocalyptic Society: New Orleans Mardi Gras after Katrina,” Colloque: Katrina 2005, Université Lumière - Lyon 2 — Département d'études du monde Anglophone, March 31, 2011.
"'It was Very Vexing to Have My Sons Carried Off': African Families Redeem Their Enslaved Relatives during the 18th-Century Atlantic Slave Trade", Centering Families in Atlantic Worlds, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Institute for Historical Studies, Univ. of Texas, University of Texas, Austin,, February 28, 2011.
“Preserving Cultural Heritage in a Post-Apocalyptic Society: New Orleans Mardi Gras after Katrina,” From American Sodom to American Phoenix: The Destruction and Rebirth of New Orleans, Tulane University, October 22, 2010.
“Why Mardi Gras Matters,” Organization of American Historians, Washington, D.C., April 9, 2010.
“American Sodom: New Orleans' Past as Prologue,” American Historical Association, San Diego, CA, January 9, 2010.
“American Sodom: New Orleans’ Past as Prologue,” Southern Historical Association, New Orleans, LA, October 12, 2008.
"By Fraud, Force or Violence": African Kidnap Victims in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic Slave Trade.” “Finding the African Voice: Narratives of Slavery and Enslavement” (workshop organized by Martin Klein), Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Study and Conference Center, Bellagio, Italy, Sept. 24-28, 2007.
"They are all freemen and no slaves : The Enslavement of African Kidnap Victims in the 18th-Century British Atlantic Slave Trade." Micro-histoire et histoires de vie d’esclaves, Centre International de Recherches sur les Esclavages, Paris, France. May 29-30, 2007.
"Defining Slavery: The Enslavement and Redemption of African Kidnap Victims in the 18th-Century Atlantic Slave Trade." Slavery and Unfinished Business, Wilberforce Institute for the study of the Slavery and Emancipation (WISE), University of Hull, Hull, England, May 16-19, 2007.
”Defining Slavery: The Enslavement and Redemption of African Kidnap Victims in the 18th-Century Atlantic Slave Trade.” “Black Diaspora in the South and the Caribbean,” Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, March 17, 2006.
"American Sodom: New Orleans Faces Its Critics and an Uncertain Future." Tulane-Cambridge Atlantic World Conference IV. “Hurricane Katrina: Historians as First Responders”, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England. May 25-26, 2006.
"American Sodom: New Orleans Faces Its Critics and an Uncertain Future." “Louisiana Adrift,” Le Centre d’études nord-américaines de l’EHESS, Paris, France. December 16, 2005.
“The Two Princes of Calabar and the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World,” Le Centre d’études nord-américaines de l’EHESS, Paris, France. December 8, 2005.
“African Kidnap Victims in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Slave Trade,” Transatlantic Crossings, The DeBartolo Conference on Eighteenth Century Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, February 21, 2004.
“Protestantism in the Louisiana Purchase Territory, 1803-1830,” "The Louisiana Purchase: Faces and Cultures of Yesterday and Today," Louisiana State University, November 6, 2003 (invited speaker).
“The Two Princes of Calabar and the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World,” University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, October 8, 2003 (invited speaker).
“Challenges of a Microhistory of the Atlantic World,” a seminar conducted at Wake Forest University, October 7, 2003 (invited speaker).
“The Two Princes of Calabar,” Wake Forest University, October 6, 2003 (invited speaker).
“A Hard Field to Cultivate: Protestantism in the Lower Mississippi Valley, 1730-1830,” Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, January 24, 2003 (invited speaker).
“The Two Princes of Calabar and the Creation of Afro-Atlantic Identity,” Citizens, Nations & Cultures: Transatlantic Perspectives, Maastricht Center for Transatlantic Studies, Maastricht, Holland, October 18, 2002.
"The Two Princes of Calabar and the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World," Forum on European Expansion and Global Interaction, San Marino, CA, February 14-16, 2002.

“The Two Princes of Calabar: An Atlantic Odyssey from Slavery to Freedom,” Rice University, September 25, 2001 (invited speaker).


“The Two Princes of Calabar: An Atlantic Odyssey from Slavery to Freedom,” Seventh Annual Meeting of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, University of Glasgow, Scotland, July 14, 2001.
“The Two Princes of Calabar,” Gottschalk Lectures in History, University of Louisville, April 5, 2001 (invited speaker).
“The Two Princes of Calabar” presented at “From Slavery to Freedom: Manumission in the Atlantic World” held at the College of Charleston, October 4-7, 2000.
“Religion in Mississippi,” Natchez Literary Festival, July 2000 (invited plenary speaker).
"The Southern Way of Death: The Meaning of Death in Antebellum White Evangelical Culture" presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Association, Birmingham, Ala., November 11-14, 1998.
"Plain Folk vs. Pillared Folk: The Evangelical Challenge in the Old Natchez District" presented at the Third Biennial Historic Natchez Conference, February 18-21, 1998, Natchez, Miss. (Invited plenary speaker).
"A Search for Life's Meanings: Mississippi's White Sunday Schools and the Race Question, 1900-1969" presented at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians in San Francisco, CA, April 19, 1997.
"Keaton vs. Miller: Miscegenation, the Courts, and Slavery in Mississippi" presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History, Charleston, SC, October 4, 1996.
"The Evolution of Christian Republicanism: Religion, Society and Politics in Mississippi, 1800-1860" presented at the 1994 meeting of the Organization of American Historians in Atlanta, Ga.
"'To Move a World': Race, Gender, and Modernization in Mississippi Evangelical Churches, 1830-1860" presented at the 1993 meeting of the Southern Historical Association in Orlando, Fla.
"'In Bonds of Love': The Search for Order and Discipline Among Mississippi Evangelicals, 1770-1865" presented at the 1992 meeting of the American Historical Association in Washington, D.C.
"A Christian Sisterhood: Women in Mississippi Evangelical Churches, 1789-1877" presented at the Southern Studies Colloquium, Charleston, S.C., October 1991.
"A Wholesome, Godly Discipline: Race and Gender in Mississippi Evangelical Church Courts, 1806-70" presented at the 1989 meeting of the Organization of American Historians in St. Louis, Missouri.
"God's Kingdom in the Cotton Kingdom: Mississippi Biracial Churches and Slavery, 1800-70" presented at the 1987 meeting of the Southern Historical Association in New Orleans, Louisiana.
"A Mingled Yarn: Biracial Evangelical Churches in Amite County, Mississippi, 1800-70" presented at the 1987 meeting of the Mississippi and Louisiana Historical Societies in New Orleans, Louisiana.
"Order on the Frontier: Religion in Amite County, Mississippi, 1800-70" presented at the 1985 meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association in Houston, Texas.

"John P. Osterhout: Yankee, Rebel, Republican," presented at the 1983 meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association in Houston, Texas.


BOOK REVIEWS:
41. Patricia C. Griffin, ed. Sitiki, The Odyssey of an African Slave for the Journal of Southern History LXXVII (February 2011), 144-45.
40. Charles F. Irons, The Origins of Proslavery Christianity: White and Black Evangelicals in Colonial and Antebellum Virginia for the American Historical Review 114 (December 2009), 1453-54.
39. Douglas B. Chambers, Murder at Montpelier: Igbo Africans in Virginia for the Journal of Southern History 72 (August 2006), 651-52.
38. Philip Gould, Barbaric Traffic: Commerce and Anti-Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World for the Journal of Southern History 71 (May 2005), 423-24.
37. Philip N. Mulder, A Controversial Spirit: Evangelical Awakenings in the South for the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography CIII (2003), 302-03.
36. Joint review of John Patrick Daly, When Slavery Was Called Freedom: Evangelicalism, Proslavery, and the Causes of the Civil War and Stephen R. Haynes, Noah’s Curse: The Biblical Justification of American Slavery for the Journal of American History 90 (December 2003).

35. Leif Svalesen, The Slave Ship Fredensborg for the Journal of Southern History, LXIX (February 2003), 142-43.


34. John B. Boles, ed., Autobiographical Reflections on Southern Religious History for The Southern Quarterly, LXI (Fall 2002), 126-27.
33. Beth Barton Schweiger, The Gospel Working Up: Progress and the Pulpit in Nineteenth-Century Virginia for the American Historical Review 88 (June 2001): 980-81.
32. Gardiner H. Shattuck, Jr., Episcopalians and Race: Civil War to Civil Rights for the Georgia Historical Quarterly, 85 (Spring 2001): 165-67.
31. John H. Wigger, Taking Heaven By Storm: Methodism and the Rise of Popular Christianity in America, for the American Historical Review, 105 (April 2000): 541-42.
30. Joseph G. Tregle, Jr., Louisiana in the Age of Jackson: A Clash of Cultures and Personalities for the Gulf South Historical Review ,16 (Fall 2000): 98-100.

29. Dale Edwyna Smith, The Slaves of Liberty: Freedom in Amite County, 1820-1868 for the Journal of Southern History, LXV (November 1999): 858-59.


28. Wayne W. Flynt, Alabama Baptists: Southern Baptists in the Heart of Dixie for the Journal of American History, 86 (September 1999), 747-48.
27. Daniel W. Stowell, Rebuilding Zion: The Religious Reconstruction of the South, 1863-1877 for the Journal of Southern Religion (February 1999).
26. Robert Olwell, Masters, Slaves, and Subjects: The Culture of Power in the South Carolina Low Country, 1740-1790 for The Georgia Historical Quarterly, 83 (Summer 1999): 364-65.
25. Charles R. Wilson, Judgement and Grace in Dixie: Southern Faiths from Faulkner to Elvis for the Journal of Mississippi History LX (Summer 1998).
24. Christine Leigh Heyrman, Southern Cross: The Beginnings of the Bible Belt for the Journal of American History, 85 (June 1998): 226-27.
23. Gregory A. Wills, Democratic Religion: Freedom, Authority, and Church Discipline in the Baptist South, 1785-1900 for the Journal of Southern History, LXIV (May 1998): 336-37.
22. Diana Hochstedt Butler, Standing Against the Whirlwind: Evangelical Episcopalians in Nineteenth-Century America for the American Historical Review, 102 (June 1997): 890.
21. Alonzo Johnson and Paul Jersild, eds., "Ain't Gonna Lay My 'Ligion Down": African American Religion in the South for the Georgia Historical Quarterly, 81 (Fall 1997): 794-95.
20. Deborah Vansau McCauley, Appalachian Mountain Religion: A History for the Journal of American History, 83 (June 1996): 197.
19. Erskine Clarke, Our Southern Zion: A History of Calvinism in the South Carolina Low Country, 1690-1990 for the South Carolina Historical Magazine, 97 (July 1996): 256-57.
18. Reginald Hildebrand, The Times Were Strange and Stirring: Methodist Preachers and the Crisis of Emancipation for the Georgia Historical Quarterly, LXXX (Spring 1996).
17. William E. Montgomery, Under Their Own Vine and Fig Tree: The African-American Church in the South, 1865-1900 for the Journal of Mississippi History, LVII (Summer 1995): 173.
16. Amelia Wallace, African Americans at Mars Bluff, South Carolina for the Journal of Southwest Georgia History, X (Fall 1995).
15. J. Lawrence Brasher, The Sanctified South: John Larkin Brasher and the Holiness Movement for the Journal of American History, 82 (September 1995): 773.
14. O. Kendall White, Jr. and Daryl White, eds., Religion in the Contemporary South: Diversity, Community, and Identity for the North Carolina Historical Review, LXXII (October 1995), 502-03.
13. E. Grey Diamond and Herman Hattaway, eds., Letters from Forest Place: A Plantation Family's Correspondence, 1846-1881 for the Journal of Southern History, 61 (May 1995): 376-77.
12. Barbara L. Bellows, Benevolence Among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston, 1670-1860 for the Journal of Mississippi History, LVI (May 1994): 152-53.
11. Charles H. Lippy, ed., Religion in South Carolina for the South Carolina Historical Magazine, 95 (April 1994): 189-91.
10. David B. Chesebrough, "No Sorrow Like Our Sorrow": Northern Protestant Ministers and the Assassination of Lincoln for the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, (Spring 1994): 220-21.
9. Philip D. Morgan and Ira Berlin, eds., Cultivation and Culture: Labor and the Shaping of Slave Life in the Americas for the Journal of Southwest Georgia History, VIII (Fall 1993): 81-83.
8. Janet Duitsman Cornelius, When I Can Read My Title Clear: Literacy: Slavery and Religion in the Antebellum South for the Journal of Southern History, 59 (February 1993): 134-35.
7. Gabor S. Borit, ed., Why the Confederacy Lost for the North Carolina Historical Review, LXX (January 1993): 93-94.
6. Clyde Bresee, How Grand a Flame: A Chronicle of a Plantation Family, 1813-1947 for the South Carolina Historical Magazine, 94 (January 1993): 59-60.
5. Thomas D. Clark and John D. W. Guice, Frontiers in Conflict: The Old Southwest, 1795-1830 for the Journal of Southern History, LVII (May 1991): 318-19.
4. Joint review of Clifton L. Taulbert, Once Upon a Time When We Were Colored and James P. Comer, The Life and Times of a Black Family: Maggie's American Dream for the Georgia Historical Quarterly, LXXV (Spring 1991): 194-96.
3. Dorothy Redford, Somerset Homecoming: Recovering a Lost Heritage for the Journal of Southern History, LVI (November 1990): 787-89.
2. W. Harrison Daniel, Southern Protestantism in the Confederacy for the Mississippi Quarterly, XLIII (Spring 1990): 272-73.
1. Iain Macrobert, The Black Roots and White Racism of Early Pentecostalism in the USA for the Journal of American History, 77 (June 1990): 328.
HONORS AND AWARDS:
2008 Hebert Poole Writing Award from the North Carolina Friends Historical Society for “Women Professing Godliness’: Mary Fisher, Sophia Hume, and the Quakers of Colonial Charleston.”
Newcomb College Mortar Board Award for Outstanding Teaching, 2000-01, 2001-02, 2002-03.
"Resolution of Commendation," Mississippi Historical Society, March 3, 1995, for On Jordan's Stormy Banks.
Willie D. Halsell Prize: Awarded by the Mississippi Historical Society for the best article in the Journal of Mississippi History, 1989.
James Scott Peterson Award: "Awarded occasionally to an exceptional graduate student who embodies and fosters in others the qualities of scholarly excellence, maturity, and humanity." Rice University History Department, 1988.
Mary Hayes Ewing Publication Prize: Awarded for the best published article in southern history, Rice University History Department, 1984 and 1986.
GRANTS:
Florence Gould Foundation Grant for a conference “From American Sodom to American Phoenix: The Destruction and Rebirth of New Orleans” a joint conference to be held at Tulane from Oct. 21-23, 2010 in cooperation with the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.
La Maison Francaise/CEF for “From American Sodom to American Phoenix: The Destruction and Rebirth of New Orleans”

National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Research Grant, 2002 to support “The Two Princes of Calabar” project.


COR Summer Fellowship, Tulane Committee on Research Summer Fellowships, 2001.
National Endowment for the Humanities Regional Humanities Center Planning Grant (principal investigator), awarded November 1999 ($50,000).
“Plantations of the Mind: Marketing Myths and Memories in the Heritage Tourism Industry” conference to be held at the College of Charleston April 6-9, 2000 (principal investigator), South Carolina Humanities Council Major Grant ($7,775).
"The Impact of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World" conference held at the College of Charleston October 16-18, 1998 (Rosemary Brana-Shute, principal investigator, with David Geggus and R. Sparks), National Endowment for the Humanities Grant ($40,000).
"The Edict of Nantes in Historical Perspective," April 17, 1998, Huguenot Lecture Series funded by a grant from the Florence Gould Foundation, New York ($5,000).
"Out of New Babylon: The Huguenot and Their Diaspora" held at the College of Charleston, May 14-17, 1997 (principal investigator). South Carolina Humanities Council Major Grant ($10,054).
South Carolina Humanities Council Major Grant ($5,162) for a lecture series in Southern History entitled "Tell About the South: Myth and Reality in Southern History," 1992 (principal investigator). Series speakers: Catherine Clinton, Charles R. Wilson, John B. Boles, Samuel S. Hill, Charles Joyner, and Clarence Walker.
"Medical Issues in the Humanities" lecture series co-sponsored by the Medical University of South Carolina, March 1993 (principal investigator). South Carolina Humanities Council Mini-Grant ($728).
Academic Alliance Grant, Dewitt Wallace-Readers Digest Fund/Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Grants Committee ($500), 1992.

.

South Carolina Humanities Council Mini-Grant ($650). A matching grant to fund a lecture by Philip D. Curtin, 1991.


ACTIVITIES:
Conference Organizer, with Roman Huret. “From American Sodom to American Phoenix: The Destruction and Rebirth of New Orleans” a joint conference to be held at Tulane from Oct. 21-23, 2010, in Lyon at the Université Lumière - Lyon 2 on March 31, and at the the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris on April 1-2, 2011.
Nominating Committee, Southern Historical Association, 2007.
Membership Committee, Southern Historical Association, 2006.
Simkins Prize Committee, Southern Historical Association, 2005.
Editorial Board, The Southern Quarterly, 2003-present.
Local Coordinator, Teaching the Slave Trade Project, Deep South Regional Humanities Center, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA., 2002-04.
Local Arrangements Committee Co-Chair, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture 8th Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, June 6-9, 2003.
Local Arrangements Committee Co-Chair, Southern Historical Association 67th Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, November 16-18, 2001.
Session Chair, “Southern Pentecostalism in Black and White: The Tradition of Invention,” Southern Historical Association meeting, New Orleans, LA, November 16-18, 2001.


Conference Coordinator: “New Prospects, New Partnerships: UNESCO Transatlantic Slave Trade Education Project International Meeting” for the Tulane Deep South Regional



Humanities Center, held at the College of Charleston, July 25-29, 2001.
Julia Cherry Spruill Prize Committee, Southern Association of Women’s Historians, 2000.
Commentor: “After Cane Ridge: Revivalism’s Legacy for the Old South,” Southern Historical Association, Louisville, KY, November 10, 2000.
Editor, with David Shields and Rosemary Brana-Shute, Lowcountry and Atlantic World Publication Series with the University of South Carolina Press, 1996-2000.
Participant, “Teaching Atlantic History Workshop,” sponsored by the International Seminar on the History of the Atlantic World, Harvard University, November 7-8, 1998.
Taylor Prize Committee, Southern Association of Women's Historians, 1997-98.
Local Arrangements Committee, Southern Association for Women Historians Conference, Charleston, SC, 1997.
Advisory Board, Carolina-Caribbean Association, Charleston, SC.
Membership Committee, Southern Historical Association, 1990.
Coordinator, Woodrow Wilson Summer Teachers' Institutes in History for High School Teachers, College of Charleston, 1991-95.
Editorial Assistant, Journal of Southern History, 1983-85.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page