Participants in 2013 Consolidated Appeal



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Objective 3:

To prevent and control outbreaks and reduce morbidity and mortality rates.



Objective 4:

Provide multi-sector support to current refugees and potential influx of refugees from Mali and/or potential displacements and support to host communities.



Integrating resilience in the CAP strategy

To better assist communities to cope with risks and sustainably recover from recurrent crises, resilience-related issues will be addressed in a cross-cutting manner. In this perspective, the sector leads and their partners will ensure that resilience is incorporated in every sector’s strategy. This approach is to create a synergy between the humanitarian responses and development activities while reducing the gap between these types of responses and eventually ensuring adequate humanitarian space. Therefore, this process needs to start as early as possible during a crisis.

Just as emergency relief activities are crucial to saving lives by addressing the most urgent humanitarian needs, using an early-recovery approach within the CAP strategy is crucial in the successful efforts of a community to recover and build resilience. It will also be a basis for an effective exit strategy for humanitarian actors and contribute to durable solutions by establishing the base on which nationally-led development occurs. Although the humanitarian system should not be the primary channel for resilience-building activities, it makes an important contribution in a crisis situation and during the recovery phase. In light of this consideration, and mindful of communities’ heightened vulnerability to shocks, as well as the need to support national institutions to respond to current and future crises, the United Nations Resident Coordinator in his Humanitarian Coordinator capacity has asked UN agencies and NGOs to introduce resilience-building activities into the 2013 CAP. Discussions are ongoing between humanitarian actors to integrate resilience into early response and medium- and longer-term programming in line with each organization’s specific mandate in emergency response and development, and to support the Government’s priorities.

In addition, regional actors based in Dakar, in collaboration with the Humanitarian Coordinators in the affected countries of the Sahel, have elaborated a guidance note to harmonize the humanitarian strategies at the national and regional levels. The note includes common regional strategic objectives, objectives for resilience-building, coordinated and harmonized needs assessments and agreed key performance indicators. It has served as the basis for this appeal.


Strategic objectives and indicators for 2013



Strategic objectives

Key Indicators, target groups and geographical zones

1. Provide humanitarian aid to communities suffering from or threatened by food insecurity while capitalizing on opportunities in the emergency response to foster self-reliance and resilience capacity of affected populations and rebuild livelihoods to implement time-critical early recovery activities.


Target groups and geographical zones:

1.4 million individuals

6 regions (Sahel, North, Centre East, Centre West, East, and Centre North).

Communes affected by high food prices.

Food deficit zones.

Communes affected by high rates of moderate malnutrition.

Communes affected by floods.

Communes hosting refugees.



Key indicators:

Result 1: Cash or food distributed in sufficient quantity to beneficiaries.



Indicator 1.1: Number of men, women, boys and girls receiving food/cash by gender and age group as percentage of planned figures.

Target: 100%

Monitoring responsibility: WFP



Indicator 1.2: Tonnage of food distributed, by type, as percentage of planned distribution.

Target: 100%

Monitoring responsibility: WFP - FAO



Indicator 1.3: Percentage of cash transferred, as percentage of planned.

Target: 100%

Monitoring responsibility: WFP

Result 2: Long-term assets created amongst targeted communities.

Indicator 2.1: Number of beneficiaries receiving agricultural inputs/cash/food as percentage of planned.

Target: 100%

Monitoring responsibility: FAO



Indicator 2.2: Number of assets restored or created by the communities, as percentage of planned.

Target: 100%

Monitoring responsibility: FAO



Indicator 2.3: Percentage of households supported through early recovery activities, as planned.

Target: 100%

Monitoring responsibility: FAO - WFP

Result 3: Increased capacity to monitor and respond to future shocks.

Indicator 3.1: Number of monthly coordination meetings held.

Target: 1 per month

Monitoring responsibility: WFP and FAO



Indicator 3.2: Facilitation of information management through the updating of sector information sharing tools.

Target: Update of tools on a quarterly basis.

Monitoring responsibility: WFP

Activities:

Targeting of beneficiaries.

Distribution of cash/food/agricultural inputs.

Coordination of activities.Achievement of studies related to the implementation and the monitoring of activities.

Regular monitoring of market and food security situation.

Regular monitoring and reporting of implemented programs.

Regular analysis of results and programming gaps.


2. Provide humanitarian aid to 100,000 children under five with SAM and 305,000 children under five with MAM in 2013.


Target groups:

Children under five.

Pregnant women.

Lactating women.



Geographical Zones: 13 regions and 63 health districts of the country.
Key indicators:

Result 1: Health system can detect and treat acute malnourished children.

Number of health centres providing SAM treatment.

Target: 100%

Monitoring responsibility: UNICEF and WFP

Number of health centres providing MAM treatment.

Target: Health Centres in 10 regions.

Monitoring responsibility: WFP

Number of health agents trained on the integrated management of SAM in 2013.

Target: 100% of Health Agents in 4 to 7 regions.

Monitoring responsibility: UNICEF

Number of trained community health workers trained on the community management of SAM in 2013.

Target: 100% of community health workers in 4 to 7 regions.

Monitoring responsibility: UNICEF

Result 2: 100,000 SAM children under five and 305,000 MAM children under five are treated through the health system and existing community structures.

SAM admission (cumulative).

MAM admission (cumulative).

SAM cure rate (quarterly).



Target: SAM cure rate > 75%.

Monitoring responsibility: UNICEF

MAM cure rate (quarterly).

Target: MAM cure rate > 75%.

Monitoring responsibility: WFP

Result 3: At least 71,000 PLW have received appropriate messages on infant and young-child feeding (IYCF.)

Number of women reached by IYCF messages through behaviour-change communication activities.



3. To prevent and control outbreaks and reduce morbidity and normally high death rate of transmitted and non-transmitted diseases.


Geographical areas:

Communes affected by pockets of drought.

Communes affected by floods.

Communes hosting refugees.

Communes having notified cases of meningitis, measles and cholera.

Target groups:

All the population of areas affected by outbreaks.

Pregnant women and lactating women.

Youth/adolescents.

Monitoring responsibility: WHO

Key indicators :

Disease surveillance report completeness and timeliness (80%).

Proportion of outbreak reported within 48 hours (80%).

Proportion of outbreak investigated within 72 hours (80%).

Proportion of confirmed outbreak with adequate response (80%).

Ratio of reactive vaccination coverage by antigens (>= 95%).

Rate of fatality of diseases.

Number of maternal deaths in refugee groups.

% of assisted deliveries among pregnant women in affected areas.

% of victims of sexual violence who received appropriated medical care.



Key interventions:

Surveillance of diseases.

Screening and treatment of cases of diseases.

Supply in inputs (vaccines, consumables).

Capacity building.

Need assessment of reproductive health and sexual violence in affected area.

Supply and distribution of lifesaving reproductive health supplies and medical equipment to health facilities.

Training of health care providers on identified gaps and needs.

Support for community mobilisation activities to improve access to reproductive health information and services including HIV and GBV.

Sensitisation of authorities on the need for pregnant women to benefit from supplementary food ration.



4. Provide multi-sectoral support to current refugees and potential influx of refugees from Mali and/or potential displacements and support to host communities.



Food Security and Nutrition

Output 1.1: food needs of refugees are covered.



  • Indicators: Percentage of refugees receiving 2,100 Kcal per day as percentage of planned.

Output 1.2: Distributions meeting in accordance with protection standards

  • Indicators: monitoring of distribution made. Baseline : 3 ; Goal : 5.

Nutrition

Output: Nutritional screening 6 to 59 months.



  • Indicators: Percentage of children screened for malnutrition.

Output: Reduction of malnourished children from 6 to 59 months.

  • Indicators: Percentage of children treated for MAM and SAM.

Protection

Output: Registration of refugees.



  • Indicators: Number of registered refugees. Baseline: 35,859, goal: 50,000

Output: Continuous registration and database kept up to date.

  • Indicators: Number of profiles of refugees: baseline: 35,000, goal: 50,000.

Shelter

Output: Provision of emergency shelters,



  • Indicator: Number of distributed emergency shelters. Baseline: 2,673 tents, goal: 5 million

Water and sanitation

Output: WMCs established and maintained.



  • Indicators: Number of water committees established. Baseline: 0, goal: 22 Committees.

Output: Water system constructed, expanded and/or upgraded.

  • Indicators: number of constructed facilities, teams and/or maintained. Baseline: 22, objective: 32 (22 old + 10 new for Goudebo).

Output: Water trucking of water in the back site.

  • Indicator: umber of litres of drinking water per day and per person.

Output: Latrines for the refugees in sites.

  • Indicator: Number of cabins of latrines available for the refugees in the sites.

Output: Shower for the refugees in sites.

  • Indicator: Number of shower for the refugees in the sites.

Health

Output: Access to health services for refugee population improved.



  • Indicator: Five health facilities equipped/constructed or rehabilitated and staffed.

Education

Output: Access to education and training opportunities for school-age children (3-17).



  • Indicators: Percentage of children and adolescents enrolled in education and training programmes.

Child protection

Output: Setting up of monitoring and reporting mechanism on child-rights violations.



  • Indicator: Child-rights violations cases reported.

Output: Child-friendly spaces with recreational and psycho-social support.

  • Indicator: Number of children attending.

Output: Sensitization on child protection in emergency issues.

  • Indicator: Number of participants.

Output: Verification of unaccompanied and separated children and assistance to their reunification.

  • Indicator: Number of children reunified.

Output: Setting up of child-protection committees in refugee sites.

  • Indicator: Number of child-protection committees.

Output: Setting up of a child-sensitive referral system.

  • Indicator: Number of children referred.




Criteria for selection and prioritization of projects

Projects put forward in this appeal have been selected and prioritized after peer review within each sector using the following criteria:



CAP project selection criteria:

  • The needs that the project plans to address must be confirmed by evidence that is solid by reason of first-hand assessment on the ground, or triangulation (multiple independent sources).

  • The project must contribute to the sector objectives, and must contribute towards the achievement of at least one of the strategic objectives agreed at the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership 2012 Workshop for the humanitarian operation in 2012.

  • The project must present a clear target in specified operational areas and should not duplicate actions implemented by other organizations.

  • The project must identify and respond to the distinct needs of women, girls, boys and men as well as vulnerable groups including the elderly and people with disabilities, or justify its focus on one group (i.e. targeted action).

  • The implementing agency must have a recognized capacity to implement the project.

  • The proposing organization must be part of existing coordination structures (sector working group member).

  • The implementation of the project or part thereof must present a budget for one year maximum and be feasible within the suggested timeframe.

  • The project must be cost-effective in terms of the number of beneficiaries and the needs to which the project intends to respond.

  • Projects should avoid repetition with projects in 2012; where such repetition is unavoidable, the proposing organization should justify why the particular project is needed for another year.

To identify priority projects, two tiers of priority have been defined: very high and high. This will ease the identification of top-priority activities, geographical areas and target groups within and for each sector.
Sector response plans

Food Assistance



Sector lead agency

WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME

Secrétariat Exécutif du Conseil National de Sécurité Alimentaire (SE-CNSA) ; Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

Funds required

$14,240,826 for 6 projects

Contact information

Ariane Waldvogel (ariane.waldvogel@wfp.org); Isabel Pike (Isabel.pike@wfp.org)

People in need and target beneficiaries

Category of people in need




Number of people in need




Beneficiaries targeted in sector’s CAP projects (end-year target)




Female

Male

Total




Female

Male

Total

Vulnerable households




867,000

833,000

1,700,000




714,000

686,000

1,400,000

Explanation of the number of targeted beneficiaries

The food and nutrition crisis in 2012 exacerbated the chronically high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition found in Burkina Faso. Furthermore, though forecasts for the harvest of the 2012 agricultural season are favourable due to sufficient and evenly distributed rainfall, households’ assets remain exhausted from coping with the impact of the food and nutrition crisis. Negative coping strategies that communities resort to during times of food insecurity include selling off productive assets and livestock, borrowing money and shifting to non-agricultural activities such as mining, all of which have a negative impact on households’ livelihoods, leading to persistent cycle of food insecurity. These coping strategies indicate the need to invest in helping communities recover from the crisis and building their capacity to withstand shocks in order to prevent them from resorting to these measures. An improvement of the food security situation in Burkina Faso requires the humanitarian community, in line with the Government, to respond to frequent food security and nutrition crises caused by climatic and economic shocks, to rebuild livelihoods affected by these shocks, and to strengthen the resilience of affected communities. Areas and numbers of beneficiaries to be assisted will be selected based upon needs determined by the various partners and specified in the selected projects.



How the sector response plan will contribute to the strategic objectives

The sector response programme in Burkina Faso aims to integrate a regional approach focused on the livelihoods of vulnerable populations and disaster risk reduction and management so as to form a sustainable support strategy for improving the resilience of people. Resilience is a key strategic concept for the agricultural sector. The ability to prevent disasters and crises and to anticipate, absorb, and efficiently recover from disasters in a timely and sustainable manner will strengthen the vulnerable Sahelian population. Activities will include protecting, restoring and improving structures and functions of food and agricultural systems under threat through the support to the (i) crop farmers (off-season vegetable production), (ii) cattle farmers including improved animal health.



Sector objectives and output targets

Strategic objective #1

Provide humanitarian aid to communities suffering from or threatened by food insecurity while capitalizing on opportunities in the emergency response to foster the self-reliance and resilience capacity of affected population and rebuild livelihoods for implementing time-critical early recovery activities.



Sector objective #1
To support communities affected by the 2012 food and nutrition crisis with assistance that is unconditional or conditional and in the form of food or cash, depending upon the specific needs of the targeted area and its population.


Output Indicator

2013 target

Number of men, women, boys and girls receiving food/cash by gender and age group as % of planned figures.

100%

Tonnage of food distributed, by type, as % of planned distribution.

100%

Percentage of cash transferred, as percentage of planned.

100%

Sector objective #2
To increase the ability of communities to withstand future climactic and economic shocks that undermine food security through strengthening their livelihoods and assets.


Output Indicator

2013 target

Number of beneficiaries receiving agricultural inputs/cash/food as percentage of planned.

100%

Number of assets restored or created by the communities as percentage of planned.

100%

Percentage of households supported through early recovery activities as planned.

100%

Sector objective #3
To build the capacity of the Government and humanitarian community to monitor the food security situation in order to act in a concerted, timely and effective manner.

Output: Increased capacity to monitor and respond to future shocks




Output Indicator

2013 target

Number of monthly coordination meetings held.

1 per month

Facilitation of information management through the updating of sector information sharing tools (matrix and mapping of interventions).

Update of tools on a quarterly basis.
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