Part 3 – compliance requirements introduction



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Audit Objectives

1. Obtain an understanding of internal control, assess risk, and test internal control as required by OMB Circular A-133 §___.500(c).

2. Matching – Determine whether the minimum amount or percentage of contributions or matching funds was provided.

3. Level of Effort – Determine whether specified service or expenditure levels were maintained.

4. Earmarking – Determine whether minimum or maximum limits for specified purposes or types of participants were met.

Suggested Audit Procedures – Internal Control

1. Using the guidance provided in Part 6 – Internal Control, perform procedures to obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit to support a low assessed level of control risk for the program.

2. Plan the testing of internal control to support a low assessed level of control risk for matching, level of effort, earmarking and perform the testing of internal control as planned. If internal control over some or all of the compliance requirements is likely to be ineffective, see the alternative procedures in §___.500(c)(3) of OMB Circular A-133, including assessing the control risk at the maximum and considering whether additional compliance tests and reporting are required because of ineffective internal control.

3. Consider the results of the testing of internal control in assessing the risk of noncompliance. Use this as the basis for determining the nature, timing, and extent (e.g., number of transactions to be selected) of substantive tests of compliance.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Compliance

1. Matching

a. Perform tests to verify that the required matching contributions were met.

b. Ascertain the sources of matching contributions and perform tests to verify that they were from an allowable source.

c. Test records to corroborate that the values placed on in-kind contributions (including third party in-kind contributions) are in accordance with the OMB cost principles circulars, the A-102 Common Rule, OMB Circular A-110, program regulations, and the terms of the award.

d. Test transactions used to match for compliance with the allowable costs/cost principles requirement. This test may be performed in conjunction with the testing of the requirements related to allowable costs/cost principles.

2.1 Level of EffortMaintenance of Effort

a. Identify the required level of effort and perform tests to verify that the level of effort requirement was met.

b. Perform test to verify that only allowable categories of expenditures or other effort indicators (e.g., hours, number of people served) were included in the computation and that the categories were consistent from year to year. For example, in some programs, capital expenditures may not be included in the computation.

c. Perform procedures to verify that the amounts used in the computation were derived from the books and records from which the audited financial statements were prepared.

d. Perform procedures to verify that non-monetary effort indicators were supported by official records.

2.2 Level of EffortSupplement Not Supplant

a. Ascertain if the entity used Federal funds to provide services which they were required to make available under Federal, State, or local law and were also made available by funds subject to a supplement not supplant requirement.

b. Ascertain if the entity used Federal funds to provide services which were provided with non-Federal funds in the prior year.

(1) Identify the federally funded services.

(2) Perform procedures to determine whether the Federal program funded services that were previously provided with non-Federal funds.

(3) Perform procedures to ascertain if the total level of services applicable to the requirement increased in proportion to the level of Federal contribution.

3. Earmarking

a. Identify the applicable percentage or dollar requirements for earmarking.

b. Perform procedures to verify that the amounts recorded in the financial records met the requirements (e.g., when a minimum amount is required to be spent for a specified type of service, perform procedures to verify that the financial records show that at least the minimum amount for this type of service was charged to the program; or, when the amount spent on a specified type of service may not exceed a maximum amount, perform procedures to verify that the financial records show no more than this maximum amount for the specified type of service was charged to the program).

c. When earmarking requirements specify a minimum percentage or amount, select a sample of transactions supporting the specified amount or percentage and perform tests to verify proper classification to meet the minimum percentage or amount.

d. When the earmarking requirements specify a maximum percentage or amount, review the financial records to identify transactions for the specified activity which were improperly classified in another account (e.g., if only 10 percent may be spent for administrative costs, review accounts for other than administrative costs to identify administrative costs which were improperly classified elsewhere and cause the maximum percentage or amount to be exceeded).

e. When earmarking requirements prescribe the minimum number or percentage of specified types of participants that can be served, select a sample of participants that are counted toward meeting the minimum requirement and perform tests to verify that they were properly classified.

f. When earmarking requirements prescribe the maximum number or percentage of specified types of participants that can be served, select a sample of other participants and perform tests to verify that they were not of the specified type.

Note: The suggested audit procedures above for internal control and compliance testing may be accomplished using dual-purpose testing.

H. PERIOD OF AVAILABILITY OF FEDERAL FUNDS

Compliance Requirements

Federal awards may specify a time period during which the non-Federal entity may use the Federal funds. Where a funding period is specified, a non-Federal entity may charge to the award only costs resulting from obligations incurred during the funding period and any pre-award costs authorized by the Federal awarding agency. Also, if authorized by the Federal program, unobligated balances may be carried over and charged for obligations of a subsequent funding period. Obligations means the amounts of orders placed, contracts and subgrants awarded, goods and services received, and similar transactions during a given period that will require payment by the non-Federal entity during the same or a future period (A-102 Common Rule, §___.23; OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.28)).

Non-Federal entities subject to the A-102 Common Rule shall liquidate all obligations incurred under the award not later than 90 days after the end of the funding period (or as specified in a program regulation) to coincide with the submission of the annual Financial Status report (SF 269) (NOTE: See L, “Reporting,” regarding the transition from use of this form to a new governmentwide form). The Federal agency may extend this deadline upon request (A-102 Common Rule, §___.23).

An example used by a program to determine when an obligation occurs (is made) is found under Part 4, Department of Education, CFDA 84.000 (Cross-Cutting Section).



Source of Governing Requirements

The requirements for period of availability of Federal funds are contained in the A-102 Common Rule (§____.23), OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.28), program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award.



Audit Objective

1. Obtain an understanding of internal control, assess risk, and test internal control as required by OMB Circular A-133 §___.500(c).

2. Determine whether Federal funds were obligated within the period of availability and obligations were liquidated within the required time period.

Suggested Audit Procedures – Internal Control

1. Using the guidance provided in Part 6 – Internal Control, perform procedures to obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit to support a low assessed level of control risk for the program.

2. Plan the testing of internal control to support a low assessed level of control risk for period of availability of Federal funds and perform the testing of internal control as planned. If internal control over some or all of the compliance requirements is likely to be ineffective, see the alternative procedures in §___.500(c)(3) of OMB Circular A-133, including assessing the control risk at the maximum and considering whether additional compliance tests and reporting are required because of ineffective internal control.

3. Consider the results of the testing of internal control in assessing the risk of noncompliance. Use this as the basis for determining the nature, timing, and extent (e.g., number of transactions to be selected) of substantive tests of compliance.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Compliance

1. Review the award documents and regulations pertaining to the program and determine any award-specific requirements related to the period of availability and document the availability period.

2. Test transactions charged to the Federal award after the end of the period of availability and verify that the underlying obligations occurred within the period of availability and that the liquidation (payment) was made within the allowed time period.

3. Test transactions that were recorded during the period of availability and verify that the underlying obligations occurred within the period of availability.

4. Test adjustments to the Federal funds and verify that these adjustments were for transactions that occurred during the period of availability.

Note: The suggested audit procedures above for internal control and compliance testing may be accomplished using dual-purpose testing.

As long as the auditor obtains sufficient, appropriate evidence to meet the period of availability audit objectives, the auditor may test period of availability using the same test items used to test other types of compliance requirements (e.g., activities allowed or unallowed or allowable costs/cost principles). However, if this approach is used, the auditor should exercise care in designing the sample to ensure that sample items are suitable for testing the stated objectives of compliance requirements covered by the sample.

I. PROCUREMENT AND SUSPENSION AND DEBARMENT

Compliance Requirements

Procurement

States, and governmental subrecipients of States, shall use the same State policies and procedures used for procurements from non-Federal funds. They also shall ensure that every purchase order or other contract includes any clauses required by Federal statutes and executive orders and their implementing regulations.

Local governments and Indian tribal governments which are not subrecipients of States will use their own procurement procedures provided that they conform to applicable Federal law and regulations and standards identified in the A-102 Common Rule.

Institutions of higher education, hospitals, and other non-profit organizations shall use procurement procedures that conform to applicable Federal law and regulations and standards identified in OMB Circular A-110.

All non-Federal entities shall follow Federal laws and implementing regulations applicable to procurements, as noted in Federal agency implementation of the A-102 Common Rule and OMB Circular A-110.

Source of Governing Requirements - Procurement

The requirements for procurement are contained in the A-102 Common Rule (§____.36), OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR sections 215.40 through 215.48), program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award. The specific references for the A-102 Common Rule and OMB Circular A-110, respectively, are given for each suggested audit procedure indicated below. (The first number listed refers to the A-102 Common Rule and the second refers to A-110.)



Suspension and Debarment

Governmentwide requirements for nonprocurement suspension and debarment are contained in the OMB guidance in 2 CFR part 180, which implements Executive Orders 12549 and 12689, Debarment and Suspension. The OMB guidance, which superseded the suspension and debarment common rule published November 26, 2003, is substantially the same as that rule.

Non-Federal entities are prohibited from contracting with or making subawards under covered transactions to parties that are suspended or debarred or whose principals are suspended or debarred. “Covered transactions” include those procurement contracts for goods and services awarded under a nonprocurement transaction (e.g., grant or cooperative agreement) that are expected to equal or exceed $25,000 or meet certain other specified criteria. 2 CFR section 180.220 of the governmentwide nonprocurement debarment and suspension guidance contains those additional limited circumstances. All nonprocurement transactions (i.e., subawards to subrecipients), irrespective of award amount, are considered covered transactions.

When a non-federal entity enters into a covered transaction with an entity at a lower tier, the non-federal entity must verify that the entity is not suspended or debarred or otherwise excluded. This verification may be accomplished by checking the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) maintained by the General Services Administration (GSA), collecting a certification from the entity, or adding a clause or condition to the covered transaction with that entity (2 CFR section 180.300). The information contained in the EPLS is available in printed and electronic formats. The printed version is published monthly. Copies may be obtained by purchasing a yearly subscription from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, or by calling the Government Printing Office Inquiry and Order Desk at (202) 783-3238. The electronic version can be accessed on the Internet (http://epls.arnet.gov).



Source of Governing Requirements – Suspension and Debarment

The requirements for suspension and debarment are contained OMB guidance in 2 CFR part 180, which implements Executive Orders 12549 and 12689, Debarment and Suspension; Federal agency regulations in 2 CFR implementing the OMB guidance; the A-102 Common Rule (§____.36); OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.13); program legislation; Federal awarding agency regulations; and the terms and conditions of the award. Most of the Federal agencies have adopted this guidance and relocated their associated agency rules in Title 2 of the CFR as final rules. For any agency that has not completed its adoption of 2 CFR part 180, pending completion of that adoption, agency implementations of the common rule remain in effect. Appendix II includes the current CFR citations for all agencies. In either case, the applicable requirements are specified in the terms and conditions of award.



Audit Objectives

1. Obtain an understanding of internal control, assess risk, and test internal control as required by OMB Circular A-133 §___.500(c).

2. Determine whether procurements were made in compliance with the provisions of the
A-102 Common Rule, OMB Circular A-110, and other procurement requirements specific to an award.

3. For covered transactions determine whether the non-Federal entity verified that entities are not suspended or debarred or otherwise excluded.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Internal Control

1. Using the guidance provided in Part 6 – Internal Control, perform procedures to obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit to support a low assessed level of control risk for the program.

2. Plan the testing of internal control to support a low assessed level of control risk for procurement and suspension and debarment and perform the testing of internal control as planned. If internal control over some or all of the compliance requirements is likely to be ineffective, see the alternative procedures in §___.500(c)(3) of OMB Circular A-133, including assessing the control risk at the maximum and considering whether additional compliance tests and reporting are required because of ineffective internal control.

3. Consider the results of the testing of internal control in assessing the risk of noncompliance. Use this as the basis for determining the nature, timing, and extent (e.g., number of transactions to be selected) of substantive tests of compliance.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Compliance

(Procedures 1 - 4 apply only to institutions of higher education, hospitals, and other non-profit organizations; and Federal awards received directly from a Federal awarding agency by a local government or an Indian tribal government.)

1. Obtain entity’s procurement policies. Verify that the policies comply with applicable Federal requirements (§____.36(b)(1) and 2 CFR section 215.43).

2. Ascertain if the entity has a policy to use statutorily or administratively imposed in State or local geographical preferences in the evaluation of bids or proposals. If yes, verify that these limitations were not applied to federally funded procurements except where applicable Federal statutes expressly mandate or encourage geographic preference (§____.36(c)(2) and 2 CFR section 215.43).

3. Examine procurement policies and procedures and verify the following:

a. Written selection procedures require that solicitations incorporate a clear and accurate description of the technical requirements for the material, product, or service to be procured, identify all requirements that the offerors must fulfill, and include all other factors to be used in evaluating bids or proposals (§____.36(c)(3) and 2 CFR section 215.44(a)(3)).

b. There is a written policy pertaining to ethical conduct (§____.36(b)(3) and 2 CFR section 215.42).

4. Select a sample of procurements and perform the following:

a. Examine contract files and verify that they document the significant history of the procurement, including the rationale for the method of procurement, selection of contract type, contractor selection or rejection, and the basis of contract price (§____.36(b)(9) and 2 CFR section 215.46).

b. Verify that procurements provide full and open competition (§____.36(c)(1) and 2 CFR section 215.43).

c. Examine documentation in support of the rationale to limit competition in those cases where competition was limited and ascertain if the limitation was justified (§____.36(b)(1) and (d)(4); and 2 CFR sections 215.43 and 215.44(e)).

d. Verify that contract files exist and ascertain if appropriate cost or price analysis was performed in connection with procurement actions, including contract modifications and that this analysis supported the procurement action (§____.36(f) and 2 CFR section 215.45).

e. Verify that the Federal awarding agency approved procurements exceeding $100,000 when such approval was required. Procurements (1) awarded by noncompetitive negotiation, (2) awarded when only a single bid or offer was received, (3) awarded to other than the apparent low bidder, or (4) specifying a “brand name” product (§____.36(g)(1) and 2 CFR 215.44(e)) may require prior Federal awarding agency approval.

f. Verify compliance with other procurement requirements specific to an award.

(Procedure 5 only applies to States and Federal awards subgranted by the State to a local government or Indian tribal government.)

5. Test a sample of procurements to ascertain if the State’s laws and procedures were followed and that the policies and procedures used were the same as for non-Federal funds.



(Procedure 6 applies to all non-Federal entities)

6. Select a sample of procurements and subawards and—

a. Test whether the non-Federal entities performed a verification check for covered transactions, by checking the EPLS, collecting a certification from the entity, or adding a clause or condition to the covered transaction with the entity; and

b. Test the sample of procurements and subawards against the EPLS, and ascertain if covered transactions were awarded to suspended or debarred parties.

Note: The suggested audit procedures above for internal control and compliance testing may be accomplished using dual-purpose testing.

J. PROGRAM INCOME



Compliance Requirements

Program income is gross income received that is directly generated by the federally funded project during the grant period. If authorized by Federal regulations or the grant agreement, costs incident to the generation of program income may be deducted from gross income to determine program income. Program income includes, but is not limited to, income from fees for services performed, the use or rental of real or personal property acquired with grant funds, the sale of commodities or items fabricated under a grant agreement, and payments of principal and interest on loans made with grant funds. Except as otherwise provided in the Federal awarding agency regulations or terms and conditions of the award, program income does not include interest on grant funds (covered under “Cash Management”), rebates, credits, discounts, refunds, etc. (covered under “Allowable Costs/Cost Principles”), or interest earned on any of them (covered under “Cash Management”). Program income does not include the proceeds from the sale of equipment or real property (covered under “Equipment and Real Property Management”).

Program income may be used in one of three methods: deducted from outlays, added to the project budget, or used to meet matching requirements. Unless specified in the Federal awarding agency regulations or the terms and conditions of the award, program income shall be deducted from program outlays. However, for research and development activities by institutions of higher education, hospitals, and other non-profit organizations, the default method is to add program income to the project budget. Unless Federal awarding agency regulations or the terms and conditions of the award specify otherwise, non-Federal entities have no obligation to the Federal Government regarding program income earned after the end of the grant period.

Source of Governing Requirements

The requirements for program income are found in the A-102 Common Rule (§____.21 (payment) and §____.25 (program income)); OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.2 (program income definition), 2 CFR section 215.22 (payment), and 2 CFR section 215.24 (program income)), program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award.



Audit Objectives

1. Obtain an understanding of internal control, assess risk, and test internal control as required by OMB Circular A-133 §___.500(c).

2. Determine whether program income is correctly determined, recorded, and used in accordance with the program requirements, A-102 Common Rule, and OMB Circular
A-110, as applicable.

Suggested Audit Procedures – Internal Control

1. Using the guidance provided in Part 6 – Internal Control, perform procedures to obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit to support a low assessed level of control risk for the program.

2. Plan the testing of internal control to support a low assessed level of control risk for program income and perform the testing of internal control as planned. If internal control over some or all of the compliance requirements is likely to be ineffective, see the alternative procedures in §___.500(c)(3) of OMB Circular A-133, including assessing the control risk at the maximum and considering whether additional compliance tests and reporting are required because of ineffective internal control.

3. Consider the results of the testing of internal control in assessing the risk of noncompliance. Use this as the basis for determining the nature, timing, and extent (e.g., number of transactions to be selected) of substantive tests of compliance.


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