Part 3 – compliance requirements introduction



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Source of Governing Requirements

The requirements for Davis-Bacon are contained in 40 USC 3141-3144, 3146, and 3147; 29 CFR part 29; the A-102 Common Rule (§___.36(i)(5)); OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR part 215, Appendix A, Contract Provisions); program legislation; Federal awarding agency regulations; and the terms and conditions of the award.



Availability of Other Information

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment Standards Administration, maintains a Davis-Bacon and Related Acts Internet page (http://www.dol.gov/esa/programs/dbra/index.htm). Optional Form WH-347 and instructions are available on this Internet page.



Audit Objectives

1. Obtain an understanding of internal control, assess risk, and test internal control as required by OMB Circular A-133 §___.500(c).

2. Determine whether the non-Federal entity notified contractors and subcontractors of the requirements to comply with the Davis-Bacon Act and obtained copies of certified payrolls.

Suggested Audit Procedures – Internal Control

1. Using the guidance provided in Part 6 – Internal Control, perform procedures to obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit to support a low assessed level of control risk for the program.

2. Plan the testing of internal control to support a low assessed level of control risk for Davis-Bacon Act and perform the testing of internal control as planned. If internal control over some or all of the compliance requirements is likely to be ineffective, see the alternative procedures in §___.500(c)(3) of OMB Circular A-133, including assessing the control risk at the maximum and considering whether additional compliance tests and reporting are required because of ineffective internal control.

3. Consider the results of the testing of internal control in assessing the risk of noncompliance. Use this as the basis for determining the nature, timing, and extent (e.g., number of transactions to be selected) of substantive tests of compliance.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Compliance

1. Select a sample of construction contracts and subcontracts greater than $2000 that are covered by the Davis-Bacon Act and perform the following procedures:

a. Verify that the required prevailing wage rate clauses were included.

b. Verify that the contractor or subcontractor submitted weekly the required certified payrolls.

Note: The suggested audit procedures above for internal control and compliance testing may be accomplished using dual-purpose testing.

E. ELIGIBILITY

Compliance Requirements

The specific requirements for eligibility are unique to each Federal program and are found in the laws, regulations, and the provisions of contract or grant agreements pertaining to the program. For programs listed in the Compliance Supplement, these specific requirements are in Part 4 – Agency Program Requirements or Part 5 – Clusters of Programs, as applicable. This compliance requirement specifies the criteria for determining the individuals, groups of individuals (including area of service delivery), or subrecipients that can participate in the program and the amounts for which they qualify.



Source of Governing Requirements

The requirements for eligibility are contained in program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award.



Audit Objectives

1. Obtain an understanding of internal control, assess risk, and test internal control as required by OMB Circular A-133 §___.500(c).

2. Determine whether required eligibility determinations were made, (including obtaining any required documentation/verifications), that individual program participants or groups of participants (including area of service delivery) were determined to be eligible, and that only eligible individuals or groups of individuals participated in the program.

3. Determine whether subawards were made only to eligible subrecipients.

4. Determine whether amounts provided to or on behalf of eligibles were calculated in accordance with program requirements.

Suggested Audit Procedures – Internal Control

1. Using the guidance provided in Part 6 – Internal Control, perform procedures to obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit to support a low assessed level of control risk for the program.

2. Plan the testing of internal control to support a low assessed level of control risk for eligibility and perform the testing of internal control as planned. If internal control over some or all of the compliance requirements is likely to be ineffective, see the alternative procedures in §___.500(c)(3) of OMB Circular A-133, including assessing the control risk at the maximum and considering whether additional compliance tests and reporting are required because of ineffective internal control.

3. Consider the results of the testing of internal control in assessing the risk of noncompliance. Use this as the basis for determining the nature, timing, and extent (e.g., number of transactions to be selected) of substantive tests of compliance.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Compliance

1. Eligibility for Individuals

a. For some Federal programs with a large number of people receiving benefits, the non-Federal entity may use a computer system for processing individual eligibility determinations and delivery of benefits. Often these computer systems are complex and will be separate from the non-Federal entity’s regular financial accounting system. Typical functions a computer system for eligibility may perform are:

- Perform calculations to assist in determining who is eligible and the amount of benefits

- Pay benefits (e.g., write checks)

- Maintain eligibility records, including information about each individual and benefits paid to or on behalf of the individual (regular payments, refunds, and adjustments)

- Track the period of time during which an individual is eligible to receive benefits, i.e., from the beginning date of eligibility through the date when those benefits stop, generally at the end of a predetermined period, unless there is a redetermination of eligibility

- Perform matches with other computer data bases to verify eligibility (e.g., matches to verify earnings or identify individuals who are deceased)

- Control who is authorized to approve benefits for eligibles (e.g., an employee may be approving benefits on-line and this process may be controlled by passwords or other access controls)

- Produce exception reports indicating likely errors that need follow-up (e.g., when benefits exceed a certain amount, would not be appropriate for a particular classification of individuals, or are paid more frequently than normal)

Because of the diversity of computer systems, both hardware and software, it is not practical for this Supplement to provide suggested audit procedures to address each system. However, generally accepted auditing standards provide guidance for the auditor when computer processing relates to accounting information that can materially effect the financial statements being audited. Similarly, when eligibility is material to a major program, and a computer system is integral to eligibility compliance, the auditor should follow this guidance and consider the non-Federal entity’s computer processing. The auditor should perform audit procedures relative to the computer system for eligibility as necessary to support the opinion on compliance for the major program. Due to the nature and controls of computer systems, the auditor may choose to perform these tests of the computer systems as part of testing the internal controls for eligibility.

b. Split Eligibility Determination Functions

(1) Background – Some non-Federal entities pay the Federal benefits to the eligible participants but arrange with another entity to perform part or all of the eligibility determination. For example, a State arranges with local government social services agencies to perform the “intake function” (e.g., the meeting with the social services client to determine income and categorical eligibility) while the State maintains the computer systems supporting the eligibility determination process and actually pays the benefits to the participants. The State is fully responsible for Federal compliance for the eligibility determination as the benefits are paid by the State and State shows the benefits paid as Federal awards expended on the State’s Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards. Therefore, the auditor of the State is responsible for meeting the internal control and compliance audit objectives for eligibility. This may require the auditor of the State to perform or arrange for additional procedures to ensure compliant eligibility determinations when another entity performs part of the eligibility determination functions.

(2) Ensure that eligibility testing includes all benefit payments regardless of whether another entity, by arrangement, performs part of the eligibility determination functions.

c. Perform procedures to ascertain if the non-Federal entity’s records/database includes all individuals receiving benefits during the audit period (e.g., that the population of individuals receiving benefits is complete).

d. Select a sample of individuals receiving benefits and perform tests to ascertain if

(1) The required eligibility determinations and redeterminations, (including obtaining any required documentation/verifications) were performed and the individual was determined to be eligible. Specific individuals were eligible in accordance with the compliance requirements of the program. (Note that some programs have both initial and continuing eligibility requirements and the auditor should design and perform appropriate tests for both. Also, some programs require periodic redeterminations of eligibility, which should also be tested.)

(2) Benefits paid to or on behalf of the individuals were calculated correctly and in compliance with the requirements of the program.

(3) Benefits were discontinued when the period of eligibility expired.

e. In some programs, the non-Federal entity is required to use a quality control process to obtain assurances about eligibility. Review the quality control process and perform tests to ascertain if it is operating to effectively meet the objectives of the process and in compliance with applicable program requirements.

2. Eligibility for Group of Individuals or Area of Service Delivery

a. In some cases, the non-Federal entity may be required to perform procedures to determine whether a population or area of service delivery is eligible. Test information used in determining eligibility and ascertain if the population or area of service delivery was eligible.

b. Perform tests to ascertain if:

(1) The population or area served was eligible.

(2) The benefits paid to or on behalf of the individuals or area of service delivery were calculated correctly.

3. Eligibility for Subrecipients

a. If the determination of eligibility is based upon an approved application or plan, obtain a copy of this document and identify the applicable eligibility requirements.

b. Select a sample of the awards to subrecipients and perform procedures to verify that the subrecipients were eligible and amounts awarded were within funding limits.

Note: The suggested audit procedures above for internal control and compliance testing may be accomplished using dual-purpose testing.

F. EQUIPMENT AND REAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Compliance Requirements

Equipment Management

Title to equipment acquired by a non-Federal entity with Federal awards vests with the non-Federal entity. Equipment means tangible nonexpendable property, including exempt property, charged directly to the award having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5000 or more per unit. However, consistent with a non-Federal entity’s policy, lower limits may be established.

A State shall use, manage, and dispose of equipment acquired under a Federal grant in accordance with State laws and procedures. Subrecipients of States who are local governments or Indian tribes shall use State laws and procedures for equipment acquired under a subgrant from a State.

Local governments and Indian tribes shall follow the A-102 Common Rule for equipment acquired under Federal awards received directly from a Federal awarding agency. Institutions of higher education, hospitals, and other non-profit organizations shall follow the provisions of OMB Circular A-110. Basically, the A-102 Common Rule and OMB Circular A-110 require that equipment be used in the program for which it was acquired or, when appropriate, other Federal programs. Equipment records shall be maintained, a physical inventory of equipment shall be taken at least once every two years and reconciled to the equipment records, an appropriate control system shall be used to safeguard equipment, and equipment shall be adequately maintained. When equipment with a current per unit fair market value of $5000 or more is no longer needed for a Federal program, it may be retained or sold with the Federal agency having a right to a proportionate (percent of Federal participation in the cost of the original project) amount of the current fair market value. Proper sales procedures shall be used that provide for competition to the extent practicable and result in the highest possible return.



Source of Governing Requirements – Equipment

The requirements for equipment are contained in the A-102 Common Rule (§___.32), OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.34), program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award.



Real Property Management

Title to real property acquired by non-Federal entities with Federal awards vests with the non-Federal entity. Real property shall be used for the originally authorized purpose as long as needed for that purpose. For non-Federal entities covered by OMB Circular A-110 and with written approval from the Federal awarding agency, the real property may be used in other federally sponsored projects or programs that have purposes consistent with those authorized for support by the Federal awarding agency. The non-Federal entity may not dispose of or encumber the title to real property without the prior consent of the awarding agency.

When real property is no longer needed for federally supported programs or projects, the non-Federal entity shall request disposition instructions. For purposes of this compliance requirement, the recipient makes the request to the Federal awarding agency. Subrecipients make requests through the recipient (pass-through entity) and do not make requests directly to the Federal awarding agency. The pass-through recipient is required to comply (ensure compliance) with the direction of the Federal awarding agency and the terms and conditions of its award. When real property is sold, sales procedures should provide for competition to the extent practicable and result in the highest possible return. If sold, non-Federal entities are normally required to remit to the awarding agency the Federal portion (based on the Federal participation in the project) of net sales proceeds. If the property is retained, the non-Federal entity shall normally compensate the awarding agency for the Federal portion of the current fair market value of the property. Disposition instructions may also provide for transfer of title in which case, the non-Federal entity is entitled to compensation for its percentage share of the current fair market value.

Source of Governing Requirements – Real Property

The requirements for real property are contained in the A-102 Common Rule (§___.31), OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.32), program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award.



Audit Objectives

1. Obtain an understanding of internal control, assess risk, and test internal control as required by OMB Circular A-133 §___.500(c).

2. Determine whether the non-Federal entity maintains proper records for equipment and adequately safeguards and maintains equipment.

3. Determine whether disposition or encumbrance of any equipment or real property acquired under Federal awards is in accordance with Federal requirements and that the awarding agency was compensated for its share of any property sold or converted to non-Federal use.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Internal Control

1. Using the guidance provided in Part 6 – Internal Control, perform procedures to obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit to support a low assessed level of control risk for the program.

2. Plan the testing of internal control to support a low assessed level of control risk for equipment and real property management and perform the testing of internal control as planned. If internal control over some or all of the compliance requirements is likely to be ineffective, see the alternative procedures in §___.500(c)(3) of OMB Circular A-133, including assessing the control risk at the maximum and considering whether additional compliance tests and reporting are required because of ineffective internal control.

3. Consider the results of the testing of internal control in assessing the risk of noncompliance. Use this as the basis for determining the nature, timing, and extent (e.g., number of transactions to be selected) of substantive tests of compliance.



Suggested Audit Procedures – Compliance

(Procedure 1 only applies to subrecipients of States that are local governments or Indian tribal governments. Procedure 2 only applies to States and to subrecipients of States that are local governments or Indian tribal governments.)

1. Obtain entity’s policies and procedures for equipment management and ascertain if they comply with the State’s policies and procedures.

2. Select a sample of equipment transactions and test for compliance with the State’s policies and procedures for management and disposition of equipment.

(Procedures 3-4 only apply to institutions of higher education, hospitals, and other non-profit organizations, and Federal awards received directly from a Federal awarding agency by a local government or an Indian tribal government.)

3. Inventory Management of Equipment

a. Inquire if a required physical inventory of equipment acquired under Federal awards was taken within the last two years. Test whether any differences between the physical inventory and equipment records were resolved.

b. Identify equipment acquired under Federal awards during the audit period and trace selected purchases to the property records. Verify that the property records contain the following information about the equipment: description (including serial number or other identification number), source, who holds title, acquisition date and cost, percentage of Federal participation in the cost, location, condition, and any ultimate disposition data including, the date of disposal and sales price or method used to determine current fair market value.

c. Select a sample of equipment identified as acquired under Federal awards from the property records and physically inspect the equipment including whether the equipment is appropriately safeguarded and maintained.

4. Disposition of Equipment

a. Determine the amount of equipment dispositions for the audit period and perform procedures to verify that dispositions were properly classified between equipment acquired under Federal awards and equipment otherwise acquired.

b. For dispositions of equipment acquired under Federal awards, perform procedures to verify that the dispositions were properly reflected in the property records.

c. For dispositions of equipment acquired under Federal awards with a current per-unit fair market value of $5000 or more, test whether the awarding agency was reimbursed for the appropriate Federal share.

(Procedure 5 applies to States, local governments, Indian tribal governments and non-profit organizations regardless of whether funding is received as a recipient or subrecipient.)

5. Disposition of Real Property

a. Determine real property dispositions for the audit period and ascertain such real property acquired with Federal awards.

b. For dispositions of real property acquired under Federal awards, perform procedures to verify that the non-Federal entity followed the instructions of the awarding agency, which will normally require reimbursement to the awarding agency for the Federal portion of net sales or fair market value at the time of disposition, as applicable.

Note: The suggested audit procedures above for internal control and compliance testing may be accomplished using dual-purpose testing.

G. MATCHING, LEVEL OF EFFORT, EARMARKING

Compliance Requirements

The specific requirements for matching, level of effort, and earmarking are unique to each Federal program and are found in the laws, regulations, and the provisions of contract or grant agreements pertaining to the program. For programs listed in this Supplement, these specific requirements are in Part 4 – Agency Program Requirements or Part 5 – Clusters of Programs, as applicable.

However, for matching, the A-102 Common Rule (§____.24) and OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.23) provide detailed criteria for acceptable costs and contributions. The following is a list of the basic criteria for acceptable matching:

- Are verifiable from the non-Federal entity’s records.

- Are not included as contributions for any other federally assisted project or program, unless specifically allowed by Federal program laws and regulations.

- Are necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient accomplishment of project or program objectives.

- Are allowed under the applicable cost principles.

- Are not paid by the Federal Government under another award, except where authorized by Federal statute to be allowable for cost sharing or matching.

- Are provided for in the approved budget when required by the Federal awarding agency.

- Conform to other applicable provisions of the A-102 Common Rule and OMB Circular A-110 and the laws, regulations, and provisions of contract or grant agreements applicable to the program.

Matching, level of effort, and earmarking are defined as follows:

1. Matching or cost sharing includes requirements to provide contributions (usually non-Federal) of a specified amount or percentage to match Federal awards. Matching may be in the form of allowable costs incurred or in-kind contributions (including third-party in-kind contributions).

2. Level of effort includes requirements for (a) a specified level of service to be provided from period to period, (b) a specified level of expenditures from non-Federal or Federal sources for specified activities to be maintained from period to period, and (c) Federal funds to supplement and not supplant non-Federal funding of services.

3. Earmarking includes requirements that specify the minimum and/or maximum amount or percentage of the program’s funding that must/may be used for specified activities, including funds provided to subrecipients. Earmarking may also be specified in relation to the types of participants covered.



Source of Governing Requirements

The requirements for matching are contained in the A-102 Common Rule (§____.24), OMB Circular A-110 (2 CFR section 215.23), program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award. The requirements for level of effort and earmarking are contained in program legislation, Federal awarding agency regulations, and the terms and conditions of the award.


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