Papers of Henry Lewis Stimson, 1867-1950 Author Index Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers



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Reel: 120
General Correspondence.

December 1948-July 28, 1949

In December and January, Stimson corresponded with Felix Frankfurter and Telford Taylor about the Nuremberg trials. Secretary of the Army Kenneth Royall also sought his advice about a new "code of military justice." During the spring he corresponded further with Frankfurter, and also McGeorge Bundy (March 8), on the Atlantic Pact. On June 18 he sent a telegram to Senators Irving M. Ives and John Foster Dulles urging that the Senate ratify the North Atlantic Treaty. President Truman wrote on June 21 to thank him for his statement. During April he decided on two new writing projects: the collection of his speeches, and the private publication of his memoirs of his outdoor experiences. For the speeches he asked Rudolph A. Winnacker, in the Department of the Army, to organize a preliminary compilation (June 9, 23). Allan Nevins wanted to interview Stimson for the Columbia oral history project and sent an outline of the proposed subjects on June 12.

Reel: 121
General Correspondence.

August 1949-February 28, 1950

Honors continued to come to Stimson in his old age and retirement. On November 1 Vannevar Bush wrote him that he was dedicating his forthcoming book, Modern Arms and Free Men to him. The Century Club asked Paul Manship to sculpt a medallion (October 28), and Eugene Speicher to paint his portrait (January 9), both to be hung in the Club. On September 29 Allan Nevins interviewed Stimson for the Columbia oral history project, using a wire recorder to make a permanent record. His own law firm asked for his help in reconstructing its history (October 25, November 16). In November Stimson began to send out copies of his privately printed memoirs titled, My Vacations. The book stimulated many letters of congratulation and reminiscence. His only active foray into politics was to contribute to the reelection campaign of John Foster Dulles (November 3). He also corresponded with Governor Thomas E. Dewey (January 20, 25) about legalizing gambling in New York. Robert P. Patterson (October 19) and Gordon Gray, secretary of the army, consulted him on the reorganization of the armed services (December 16, 19, January 3, 24). On December 6 he made a substantial contribution to Goucher College, and wrote a long letter to James B. Conant on religion at Harvard (December 27).

Reel: 122
General Correspondence.

March 1950- July 31, 1950

Stimson remained in touch with Washington and used his authority as an elder statesman to write a letter to the New York Times on March 27 defending the State Department against attacks by Senator Joseph McCarthy. He received voluminous mail during the succeeding weeks, including letters of thanks from Dean Acheson (March 27) and Harry Truman (March 28). He was also in touch with Dean Acheson (March 10, 21, April 7) concerning Spain and Spanish refugees. The incoming secretary of the army, Frank Pace, Jr., came to see Stimson on May 10 for general advice. An extended exchange of letters between Stimson and John J. McCloy discussed American policy toward Germany and the European political situation (May 19, June 28, July 5, 17, 26). When the Korean war erupted, Stimson wrote informally about it to Elizabeth Kellogg on June 27 and followed it with correspondence with President Truman (July 5, 7, 14). He also wrote to Cass Canfield, Felix Frankfurter and McGeorge Bundy during May about publishing a collection of his speeches, and corresponded with Justice William O. Douglas and Goldthwaite Dorr. An accident on July 18 which hospitalized Stimson with a broken leg brought him many cards and letters with good wishes.

Reel: 123
General Correspondence.

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November 4, 1910-December 31, 1910



The gubernatorial election took place on Tuesday, November 8. When the votes were tabulated that evening Stimson sent a telegram to John Dix conceding the election. The correspondence is then filled with letters expressing sympathy and disappointment. Theodore Roosevelt wrote on November 16 expressing his own concern about the Republican party's chances in the next presidential election. After a short rest Stimson returned to his normal routine. He sent letters of acknowledgement to those who had contributed time and money to his campaign. Philip Wells started him working with James R. Garfield on the redrafting of the constitution of the National Conservation Association. Winfred T. Denison, the assistant attorney general, consulted him about details of the sugar prosecutions. At the end of November Stimson began preparing for a speech to be given to the Tippecanoe Club of Cleveland, Ohio.

Reel: 22
General Correspondence.

Condolence letters.

October 20, 1950-January 1952

This reel, which is largely made up of letters of condolence to Mrs. Stimson, also includes a few of her replies, the eulogy that was read at Phillips Academy (June 10, 1951) and two memorial resolutions offered by neighbors in the Adirondacks in August, 1951. Two letters in 1951 also report on plans for memorials: one in Washington (January 6, 1951) and another in Germany (December 7, 1951).



Reel: 125
General Correspondence.

Mabel W. Stimson.

August 1950-October 20, 1950; undated; 1891-1955

In the last months of his life Stimson was convalescent at home following an operation on his broken leg. His last political action was to write President Truman on September 6 about universal military training. He also corresponded with Harvey H. Bundy on this question (September 1, 6, 12). Stimson died at his home on Long Island on October 20, 1950. The balance of the reel following this date contains miscellaneous undated letters to Stimson and oddments from the non-family correspondence of Mabel W. Stimson over the period 1891-1955.



Reel: 124
Memoranda, Minutes of Meetings, Notes on Conversations and Interviews, and Miscellaneous Papers.

1929-1933

On the first half of this reel are all the memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes on conversations, etc., for Stimson's years as secretary of state. Topics covered include: the Rapidan Conference (October, 1929), the World Court, the international financial crisis over war debts and reparations payments commencing in June, 1931, the Hoover moratorium, the visit of Pierre Laval (October, 1931), of Dino Grandi (November, 1931), and the General Disarmament Conference convened in Geneva. There are also memoranda for the campaign of 1932 and notes for Stimson's talks with Franklin Roosevelt and Cordell Hull through November, 1933. References to the London Naval conference are minimal as are materials relating to the situation in Manchuria.

Reel: 126
Memoranda, Minutes of Meetings, Notes on Conversations and Interviews, and Miscellaneous Papers.

July 1940-August 1944

In this critical period, covering all but the last year of the war, the documents reflect the day-to-day conduct of the War Department. All through 1940 a major question in the War Department was the arming of Britain. Stimson's preparation for testifying for the Lend-Lease bill (January 14, 1941), memos on arms for Britain, and convoys in the Atlantic (March 7, 25, 1941) were all part of the business of the War Department. With the government becoming a major industrial force, labor questions (April 4, May 1, 23) and government take-over of defense plants came under Stimson's consideration during the beginning of 1941.

Stimson also participated in shaping military policy: the defense of Iceland (July 5, 1941), oil sales to Japan (July 18, 1941), and global strategic considerations (September 12, December 21, 1941). The various battle theatres appear in turn in the memoranda: the Casablanca landing (January 4, 1942), the situation in China as seen by Stilwell (April 3, 1943) and Chennault (May 2, 1943), and the Italian invasion (June 27, 29, 1943). Stimson's own trip to Iceland, England and Algiers is reported in diary form July 8-31, 1943. A note for February 18, 1944 records Stimson's first presentation of the atom-bomb project (called S-1) to members of Congress. Shortly after the D-Day invasion, he went to France and his handwritten notes are in this reel (July 1-21, 1944). With the end in sight, issues of the postwar period steadily encroached on the war problems during 1944: DeGaulle in June, a world organization (August 23), Nazi war criminals (August 25), the organization of a single department of defense (April 18). Filmed in this reel are also notes on relations with Russia, defense of the Panama canal, the Vichy government, the Chinese military situation, war production and manpower mobilization in the United States, and Philippine politics.



Reel: 127
Memoranda, Minutes of Meetings, Notes on Conversations and Interviews, and Miscellaneous Papers.

September 1944-September 1945

During this last year of the war, its origins in the Pacific were being probed by a Congressional directive. In this reel are the transcript of the proceedings before the Army Pearl Harbor Board (September 26, 1944) and related papers. The judge advocate general submitted a detailed analysis of the report (November 25) and under the date January 3, 1945 Stimson wrote a summary statement. The recurrent themes during this last year of Stimson's secretaryship were the treatment of postwar Germany, relief and rehabilitation in Europe, the United Nations Charter, relations with Russia, and, toward the end of the period, the atomic bomb and Japan. The Morgenthau Plan for postwar Germany is filmed under the date September 4, 1944. The memoranda commenting on the plan (September 4-18, 1944) include a statement by Stimson to President Roosevelt opposing it. Stimson recorded his attendance at the Potsdam Conference in notes for his diary (July 15-24). A memorandum for July 25 reports on his meeting with Stalin. On August 8, 1945 Stimson wrote of his conference with President Truman to assess the damage that followed the atomic bombing and to discuss policy toward Japan. Under the date of August 10 there is the draft of the reply to the Japanese offer to surrender.

Reel: 128
Memoranda, Minutes of Meetings, Notes on Conversations and Interviews, and Miscellaneous Papers.

The Far Eastern Crisis.

1929-1933

The whole second half of the reel, however, relates to the Manchurian situation. It consists of materials used in the preparation of The Far Eastern Crisis which was published in 1936. This material is actually a part of the writings series. Outlines, handwritten notes, memoranda, and an extensive reference file comprise the segment. The reference file includes copies of diary entries relating to Manchuria between September 19, 1931 and March 2, 1933, a summary of cables relating to the Far East during this time, a summary of Stanley Hornbeck's memoranda, copies of Stimson's correspondence with Nelson Johnson and Charles Dawes, and copies of correspondence between Norman Davis and Sir John Simon.



Reel: 126
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Material relating to each of Stimson's trips to Europe between 1930 and 1932 is filmed on this reel. The first segment is composed of bills and receipts from the London Naval Conference in 1930. The second segment is composed of papers relating to his trip through Europe in the summer of 1931. This segment begins with memoranda of press conferences and statements for the press during the trip. Following these are mimeographed copies of the proceedings of the Conference of Ministers on Intergovernmental Debts, the roster of delegates, seating arrangements, speeches and resolutions, declarations, and press communiqu├ęs issued by the conference. At the end of this segment are press summaries, mounted newspaper clippings, and some miscellaneous material. The third segment on the reel contains an assortment of bills, receipts, and domestic accounts for Bessinge, the Stimsons' residence during the Geneva Disarmament Conference of 1932.



Reel: 167
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Correspondence, speeches, and various other material coming from persons other than Stimson or members of his family have been filmed on this reel. The material is arranged chronologically and spans a period from 1869 to 1963. At the beginning of the reel is material from 1871072 relating to the New York Bar Association committee on amendments to the code of procedure. Of interest also are some drafts of speeches and statements by Herbert Hoover which are annotated by Stimson.



Reel: 168
Selected Documents of the State Department.

In 1944 Stimson asked Rudolph Winnacker to undertake a study of the Office of the Secretary of War during World War II. Winnacker was given access to the Secretary's files as well as to the Stimson diary. In April, 1945, Winnacker began submitting drafts of chapters to Stimson. Work on the study bogged down in May, 1946 with only two of the three projected parts completed. These covered the office through 1943. Little more of the study was ever sent to Stimson, and none of it, so far as can be determined, was published. At the very beginning of this reel are photocopies of the letters of transmittal for the various portions of the study, an explanatory note by Winnacker, an outline table of contents for the completed work, and a listing of the unfinished sections. The drafts for the first two parts of the study, and a chapter in part three on the treatment of Germany follow. Some of the drafts have penciled comments, presumably by Stimson. There are extensive footnotes at the end of each chapter.



Reel: 169
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Chiefs of Missions.

Several hundred frames pertaining to the appointments of chiefs of missions, 1929-1933, follow on the reel. For each year there is a list of appointees followed by commendatory letters for persons on the list. At the end of the segment is a list of separations for each year.

Reel: 160
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Conversations.

July-August 1931

this segment is composed of memoranda of conversations during Stimson's trip to Europe in 1931. These memoranda are arranged chronologically and are not subdivided by country.



Reel: 164
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Divisional Reports.

Divisional reports from Eastern European Affairs, Far Eastern Affairs, and Latin American Affairs compose this segment. Reports summarize diplomatic relations and special subjects of divisional concern during the Hoover administration.

Reel: 165
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Divisional Reports.

Divisional reports from Latin American Affairs, Mexican Affairs, Near Eastern Affairs, and Western European Affairs compose this reel. Within the report from the Western European Affairs Division are special reports on disarmament, the Permanent Court of International Justice, prevention of liquor smuggling, and the League of Nations.

Reel: 166
Selected Documents of the State Department.

History of Legislation.

A report on legislation relating to the Department of State for both the 71st and 72nd Congresses begins this reel. Each report has an alphabetical index by subject and a numerical index by bill number.

Reel: 161
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Memoranda of Conversations.

A large body of memoranda of conversations begins on this second segment. These memoranda are often, though not always, from meetings between the secretary and a diplomatic representative. The memoranda are subdivided by country and arranged chronologically within the subdivision. Memoranda concerning countries falling alphabetically between Argentina and Finland are on this segment.

Reel: 161
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Memoranda of Conversations.

This reel is composed of memoranda of conversations about France, Germany, and Great Britain.

Reel: 162
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Memoranda of Conversations.

This reel includes memoranda of conversations about countries falling alphabetically between Greece and Yugoslavia.

Reel: 163
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Memoranda of Conversations.

Four sets of memoranda comprise this segment: transcripts of remarks made at cabinet meetings, conversations with the president, conversations with Senator Borah, and miscellaneous conversations. The arrangement of each set is chronological.

Reel: 164
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Miscellaneous Department Reports.

The segment is composed of four reports titled as follows: 1. Persons appointed under the Department since March 4, 1929 to higher positions excepted from Civil Service rules together with their principle endorsements 2. Treaty Division, Report on Treaty Progress, 1929-1933 3. Growth of the Department of State and the Foreign Service under the Hoover Administration 4. Accomplishments in Major Policy in American Foreign Relations relating to the control of the Traffic in Narcotic Drugs, March 4, 1929 - March 2, 1933.

Reel: 160
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Statements of Matters Pending.

A statement of matters pending within each division of the State Department as of April, 1929, begins this reel. The statements are arranged alphabetically by division title, i.e. Eastern European Affairs, Economic Advisor's Office, etc.

Reel: 160
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Transatlantic Phone Conversations.

Transcripts of transatlantic phone conversations between June, 1931 and February 16, 1932 compose this segment.

Reel: 164
Selected Documents of the State Department.

Transatlantic Phone Conversations.

Transcripts of transatlantic phone conversations between February 18, 1932 and January, 1933 compose this segment.

Reel: 165
Special Subjects.

American Law Institute.

1925-1927

Between 1925 and 1927 Stimson worked on a special committee of the American Law Institute to draw up a model code of criminal procedure. This segment includes the preliminary report and outline for work, a progress report to the director, copies of drafts of sections, minutes of meetings, a bibliography, and some clippings.



Reel: 145
Special Subjects.

American Peace Award.

1923-1927

In 1923 Stimson was chosen to serve on the policy committee of the American Peace Award. At the beginning of this segment are agendas for meetings of the committee, press releases, lists of suggestions for members of the jury award, summaries of press reaction, and other publicity. This segment also contains copies of memoranda for organizations and institutions cooperating in conducting the referendum. There is also filmed a copy of the winning plan. Later the American Peace Award shifted its emphasis to become a lobbying group for United States participation in the World Court. The segment concludes with various publications of the renamed American Peace Foundation which date through 1927.



Reel: 143
Special Subjects.

Ballinger-Pinchot Controversy.

A reference file on the Ballinger-Pinchot controversy comprises the first segment in this reel. In the segment are outlines and briefs for the case, copies of documents used by Pinchot in his testimony before the congressional investigating committee, reference material sent to Stimson by Charles E. Kelley of Collier's magazine, statements by persons involved in the case, notes, and memoranda.

Reel: 139
Special Subjects.

Bar Associations.

1892-1928

Material in this segment reflects Stimson's long interest in the activities of the New York State and New York City Bar Associations as well as other lawyers' groups. The segment consists of committee minutes and reports, correspondence of others, notes and reference material. Committee reports and a mimeographed set of minutes from the board meetings of the New York County Lawyers' Association have not been filmed.



Reel: 138
Special Subjects.

Campaign for Adoption of the Constitution.

1915

Stimson served on the Committee for the Adoption of the Constitution in the fall of 1915. Filmed here are financial records, correspondence of others, drafts of publicity, and printed circulars from this unsuccessful campaign.



Reel: 142
Special Subjects.

Clausen Report.

At the end of 1944 Stimson commissioned Lieutenant Colonel Henry Clausen to make a report supplementary to the findings of the Army Pearl Harbor Board. Clausen traveled around the world, interviewed nearly one hundred persons, and collected affidavits and statements which he incorporated in his report. A copy of the report, as it was submitted to Stimson in September, 1945, and other information gathered by Clausen are filmed in this segment.

Reel: 145
Special Subjects.

Constitutional Convention.

1915

In the elections of 1914 Stimson was chosen a delegate-at-large to the New York Constitutional Convention of 1915. Stimson served on the Committees on Finance, on Governor and Other State Officers, and on the Judiciary. Though this reel contains general organizational material, such as the list of delegates and the rules of the convention, most of the reel contains the records of these three committees. The records of the Committee on Finance, of which Stimson was chairman, compose more than half of this reel. For the period from April 28 to August 17, 1915, there are minutes of the committee's meetings. Whenever a guest was invited to testify before the committee, a transcript was made of his testimony. The transcripts are arranged chronologically and follow the complete set of minutes. Notes, aides-memoire, correspondence of others, and reference materials on proposed amendments follow the transcripts. There are also the committee's drafts and the final report on proposed amendments and on changes in wording of sections of the Constitution. The records of the other two committees are less voluminous. In both, amendments referred to the committee, memoranda, and reference material will be found. The records of the Committee on Governor and Other State Officers also include minutes of meetings and drafts of reports. The records of this committee precede the records of the Committee on the Judiciary on the film. The reel concludes with miscellaneous material including a sample of the printed circulars received by convention delegates, correspondence of others, and notes.



Reel: 141
Special Subjects.

Constitutional Convention Reunion.

1926

Surviving members of the New York Constitutional Convention of 1915 held a reunion dinner in December, 1926 to honor Elihu Root. Filmed on this segment are the list of members of the reunion dinner committee and the list of those invited to the dinner. There is also a record of the proceedings which includes a copy of Stimson's remarks at the celebration..



Reel: 143
Special Subjects.

Early Legal Career.

A notebook from Harvard Law School begins the segment. Also filmed in this segment are many unidentified notes and memoranda, undated and untitled but probably written during Stimson's years at Harvard, during clerkship for Sherman Evarts or his first years with Root and Clarke.

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