Papers of Henry Lewis Stimson, 1867-1950 Author Index Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers



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Papers of Henry Lewis Stimson, 1867-1950

Author Index


Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

Papers of family members in this reel are: Catherine Boudinot (Mrs. Lewis) Atterbury, Lewis Atterbury, Lucy Thurber (Mrs. Ossian) Howard, Dora Wheeler (Mrs. Boudinot) Keith, Elizabeth Kellogg, Candace Catherine Stimson, Candace Wheeler (Mrs. Lewis) Stimson, Frank Stimson, Frederick J. Stimson, and Henry A. Stimson. Catherine Boudinot and Lewis Atterbury's letters have been arranged together since many of them are addressed to "Dear Parents.".



Reel: 147
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

Papers of family members in this reel are: Henry C. Stimson, Julia Atterbury (Mrs. Henry C.) Stimson, John Ward Stimson, Lewis A. Stimson, Mabel White (Mrs. Henry L.) Stimson, Mary A. Stimson, and Philip Stimson. Letters addressed to Julia Atterbury and Henry C. Stimson have been arranged together since many of them are addressed to both parents. Letters addressed to Mary A. Stimson and her sister Catherine Weston are arranged with the papers of Catherine Weston.



Reel: 148
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

November 1888-December 1890

Letters to Mary A. Stimson and Mabel White from Cambridge discuss studies at Harvard Law School and compare the differences between student life at Harvard and Yale. Letters to Mabel White explain the necessity of rescinding their unannounced engagement. Descriptions of Stimson's new position as clerk to Sherman Evarts are contained in letters during the fall of 1890.

Reel: 150
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

January 1891-February 1892

There is an almost daily chain of letters to Mabel White on this reel. Subjects include the clerkship with Sherman Evarts, the announcement of their engagement in April, the bar examination in June, and the offer of a position in Elihu Root's law firm, as well as the daily routine.

Reel: 151
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

March 1892-July 1893

Letters on this reel are again predominantly to Mabel White. Office routine and legal cases are discussed, but there is more detail on social life and preparations for the wedding. Letters from Stimson's father and sister describe their European trip and their search for wedding gifts.

Reel: 152
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

1894-1915

The correspondence filmed on reels 153 to 158 is composed of occasional exchanges with many different relatives. Most of the correspondence concerns ordinary matters: health, vacation plans, weddings, birth announcements, education of the younger generation, financial affairs, deaths, funerals, and the settlement of estates.

Reel: 153
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

1916-June 30, 1918

The correspondence filmed on reels 153 to 158 is composed of occasional exchanges with many different relatives. Most of the correspondence concerns ordinary matters: health, vacation plans, weddings, birth announcements, education of the younger generation, financial affairs, deaths, funerals, and the settlement of estates.

Reel: 154
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

July 1918-1927

The correspondence filmed on reels 153 to 158 is composed of occasional exchanges with many different relatives. Most of the correspondence concerns ordinary matters: health, vacation plans, weddings, birth announcements, education of the younger generation, financial affairs, deaths, funerals, and the settlement of estates.

Reel: 155
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

1928-1936

The correspondence filmed on reels 153 to 158 is composed of occasional exchanges with many different relatives. Most of the correspondence concerns ordinary matters: health, vacation plans, weddings, birth announcements, education of the younger generation, financial affairs, deaths, funerals, and the settlement of estates. Of particular interest are Stimson's letters from the Philippines on reel 156 which describe climate, social life, travel, and impressions of people.

Reel: 156
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

1937-1944

The correspondence filmed on reels 153 to 158 is composed of occasional exchanges with many different relatives. Most of the correspondence concerns ordinary matters: health, vacation plans, weddings, birth announcements, education of the younger generation, financial affairs, deaths, funerals, and the settlement of estates.

Reel: 157
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

1945-1950

The correspondence filmed on reels 153 to 158 is composed of occasional exchanges with many different relatives. Most of the correspondence concerns ordinary matters: health, vacation plans, weddings, birth announcements, education of the younger generation, financial affairs, deaths, funerals, and the settlement of estates.

Reel: 158
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

Family Correspondence of Henry Lewis Stimson.

1874-October 1888

Letters to Lewis A. Stimson and Mary A. Stimson describe Stimson's studies and activities while at Andover and Yale. The first items of an almost daily correspondence with Mabel White between 1888 and 1893 are included in this segment.



Reel: 149
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

Family History.

A short segment of family history containing copies of biographical sketches of Stimson ancestors as well as reminiscences by family members begins this reel.

Reel: 159
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

Family History: Personal Memorabilia.

This segment contains stories and drawings done by Stimson as a child, prep school mementos, a scrapbook from Yale containing invitations, programs, telegrams, scorecards, tickets, clippings, other college and law school memorabilia, and a round robin letter by college friends between 1894 and 1898. Later memorabilia consists of souvenir programs and menus from testimonial dinners, citations, certificates, awards, and printed biographical sketches. At the end of this segment are the memorials and tributes offered after Stimson's death. Copies of remarks at memorial services and at the dedication of the Stimson house at Andover have also been filmed here

Passports, drivers licenses, membership cards, and souvenirs from trips are among the types of material not filmed. Souvenirs from the launching and commissioning ceremonies of the United States submarine Henry L. Stimson have also not been filmed..



Reel: 159
Family Correspondence and Other Family Papers.

General Stimson Family Correspondence.

Papers of family members in this segment are: Lucy Dunham (Mrs. Abner) Thurber, Catherine Stimson (Mrs. Theodore) Weston, Candace Thurber (Mrs. Thomas) Wheeler, James C. Wheeler, Thomas M. Wheeler, Charles A. White, Francis Eaton (Mrs. Charles White), Lily White, R. G. Gamble. The papers of the last four individuals, all members of Mrs. Stimson's family, are arranged together.

Reel: 149
General Correspondence.

March 6, 1884-March 26, 1901

Prior to 1897 most correspondence is with Yale classmates Irving Fisher, William Seward, Fred Solley, and Morison R. Waite. There are a few letters to Stimson in Cambridge from George Wharton Pepper discussing the legal profession. After joining the firm of Root and Clarke, Stimson became active in civic affairs. For his work in the 27th Assembly District Republican Club he corresponded with Richard Curd Daniel, Gherardi Davis, Herbert Parsons, B. Aymar Sands, P. Tecumseh Sherman, and William C. Wilson. He served in Squadron A of the New York National Guard, the Charity Organization Society, and the Bar Association of the City of New York, and solicited for the Yale Alumni Fund. Much in the correspondence reveals Stimson's love of hunting and the outdoors. In April, 1893, Theodore Roosevelt invited Stimson to join the Boone and Crockett Club. In this organization Stimson met Madison Grant and C. Grant LaFarge. There is correspondence with George Bird Grinnell, Amos Gaunce, and J.B. Munroe arranging hunting trips, with taxidermist Thomas Fraine, and with Gifford Pinchot.

Reel: 12
General Correspondence.

August 25, 1891-January 4, 1899

Volume 1: 1891 August 25 -1897 February 27; Volume 2: 1897 March 3 - 1899 January 4; The letterpress copies of outgoing letters between 1891 and 1894 are meager in number. There are references to family and financial matters and a few legal cases. Letter to George Wharton Pepper in November, 1893, and June, 1894, contain discussions of a monograph Stimson was to write for a legal text edited by Pepper and William Draper Lewis. Beginning in 1895 letters reflect Stimson's increasing interest in local politics. In October and November of that year Stimson wrote many letters as secretary of the Good Government Club including letters to Charles H. Ludington and Horace E. Deming in which club policy was discussed. In 1896 Stimson began working in the 27th District Republican Club for the defeat of Boss Tom Platt's machine. There are letters to club members including Richard Curd Daniel, Herbert Parsons, and William C. Wilson. In September, 1896, Stimson wrote Irving Fisher about monetary policy. Additional letters in October to Thomas Burke and Charles P. Chamberlain discuss the Republican party's prospects in Washington state and William Jennings Bryan's ideas on the free coinage of silver. Several letters written to members of the Boone and Crockett Club including Theodore Roosevelt and George Bird Grinnell exhibit Stimson's love of the outdoors. In March, 1897, Stimson wrote to Gifford Pinchot, Thomas Burke, and William H. Cowles supporting the creation of forest reservations. There are also many routine letters containing plans for hunting trips in Montana and Canada.

Reel: 1
General Correspondence.

January 1899-November 13, 1902

Volume 1: 1899 January 5 - 1900 August 25; Volume 2: 1900 August 27 - 1902 November 13; The routine considerations of Stimson's legal practice, affiliations with numerous organizations, and management of family and domestic matters are discussed in the letterpress copies in this reel. Stimson wrote frequently to his Yale classmates and enlisted subscriptions for the Yale Alumni Fund. He also served on the Committee on Admissions of the Bar Association of the City of New York, in the Charities Organization Society, and in the Boone and Crockett Club. There are letters about the Boone and Crockett Club to C. Grant LaFarge and many letters about hunting trips to Gifford Pinchot. Stimson served for a time as president of the 27th Assembly District Republican Club. Frequent correspondents on club matters included B. Aymar Sands, Richard Curd Daniel, William C. Wilson, and Gherardi Davis. On March 8, 1900, Stimson sent a brief outline of the club's history and problems to Governor Theodore Roosevelt. Of interest also is a letter written to Lloyd M. Garrison on May 4, 1900. Stimson, writing in response to an article by Garrison on the Philippines, suggested some considerations on the question of Philippine statehood versus independence.

Reel: 2
General Correspondence.

April 1, 1901-December 28, 1904

Stimson served as president of the 27th Assembly District Republican Club through 1901. After his term was over he served on the Committee on Political Action with B. Aymar Sands. Among other things, this committee opposed the mortgage tax bills which were considered by the New York State Legislature in 1903 and 1904. Stimson also served as chairman of the Finance Committee for election campaigns. He continued his affiliations with the Boone and Crockett Club and Squadron A of the New York National Guard. He served with George W. Kirchwey, Jr. on the Committee on Admissions of the Bar Association of the City of New York. He also corresponded with Madison Grant, Gifford Pinchot, A. Phimister Proctor, Elihu Root, various Yale classmates, and several hunting companions.

In 1902 Stimson began looking for property on Long Island and in the next year moved into a house which he called Highhold. In this reel are letters concerning negotiations for that property.



Reel: 13
General Correspondence.

November 13, 1902-December 5, 1905

Volume 1: 1902 November 13 - 1904 October 7; Volume 2: 1904 October 7 - 1905 December 5; Stimson's affiliations with numerous organizations and his management of family and domestic matters are discussed in the personal outgoing letters in this reel. In 1903 Stimson completed the negotiations for the purchase of a house and grounds in West Hills, Long Island, which he called Highhold. Many of the letters concern improvements on the property. Stimson's organizational activities included membership on the Committee on Admission and the Committee on Amendment of the Law of the Bar Association of the Bar Association of the City of New York, service in Squadron A of the New York National Guard, and fund raising for the Republican Campaign Committee of the 27th Assembly District. He corresponded with Alfred Stearns, Oliver Jennings, and William S. Haskell over matters concerning Phillips Academy, Andover, and in 1905 was appointed to the board of trustees. Stimson continued his association with the Boone and Crockett Club and corresponded with Madison Grant and George Bird Grinnell. There are also letters to Elihu Root and Gifford Pinchot as well as some letters to members of the state legislature concerning mortgage tax proposals.

Reel: 3
General Correspondence.

December 5, 1905-August 11, 1908

Volume 1: 1905 December 5 - 1907 May 27; Volume 2: 1907 May 28 - 1908 August 11; The letters in this reel are concerned with Stimson's private interests: family matters, vacations plans, organizational affiliations, and problems of friends. Serving as a member of the board of trustees of Phillips Academy, Andover, Stimson became familiar with many aspects of running an educational institution. He corresponded with Alfred Stearns, James Hardy Ropes, and James C. Sawyer on Andover matters. On the question of transferring Andover Theological Seminary to Cambridge he wrote to Henry A. Stimson and Alfred Ripley in January, 1907, and April, 1908. There are also letters scattered throughout the reel to J.B. Monroe and Gifford Pinchot arranging camping trips in Montana. In January, 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Stimson United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, and on January 11 Stimson, himself, wrote to Herbert Parsons mentioning the appointment. All through January there are letters acknowledging congratulatory messages and replying to suggestions for prospective staff appointees. Aside from a few letters to William H. Moody in early 1906, however, there is no other mention of the functioning of the district attorney's office in this reel.

Reel: 4
General Correspondence.

January 1905-February 28, 1906

Having distinguished himself as a fund raiser for the Permanent Endowment Fund for Phillips Academy and as president of the New York Association of Alumni and Students, Stimson was appointed in 1905 to the board of trustees. In correspondence with Oliver G. Jennings, Alfred Ripley, James H. Ropes, Thomas Sawyer, and Alfred Stearns, he discussed school finance and relations with Andover Theological Seminary. During this period Stimson served on the New York City Bar Association's Committee on the Amendment of the Law, Letters from Cephas Brainerd and Paul D. Cravath discuss the committee's efforts to defeat the legislature's mortgage tax bills. Stimson's correspondence with Gifford Pinchot continued steadily. On August 8 there is a letter from Pinchot discussing the tariff. In Pinchot's letter of December 10 he mentions the possibility of a public office for Stimson: "Yesterday I saw the President for just long enough for him to tell me that he intended to offer you the U.S.-Dist.-Attorneyship, or had done so. . . ." The correspondence after the announcement of Stimson's appointment as United States attorney for the Southern District of New York a month later contains many letters of congratulation. The only correspondence relating to official matters is with Herbert Parsons who wrote about the need for an additional district judge to handle the increasing burden of criminal cases.

Reel: 14
General Correspondence.

February 15, 1906-March 30, 1908

Volume 1 : 1906 February 15 - 1908 January 6; Volume 2: 1908 January 7 - 1909 March 30; Stimson's official outgoing letters as United States attorney for the Southern District of New York have been filmed on this reel. The two volumes filmed here cover Stimson's entire term in office and constitute a compact record of his service. On entering office Stimson initiated a radical reorganization by dividing the criminal bureau into two parts: one for regular criminal cases and the other for interstate commerce and anti-trust cases. He supported efforts by Herbert Parsons to create a new district judgeship to handle the increased criminal load and sought funds to upgrade staff salaries. Stimson solicited the aid of James Barr Ames in recruiting bright, young law graduates for his staff and eventually attracted Goldthwaite Dorr and Felix Frankfurter. Other personnel included Henry Wise, Winfred Denison, and J. Osgood Nichols. Stimson's most spectacular cases involved: prosecutions of the New York Central Railroad and the American Sugar Refining Company for rebating; conviction of James Gordon Bennett for the mailing of obscene material; indictment of Charles W. Morse of the Bank of North America for violations of the national banking laws; an investigation, instigated at the request of Theodore Roosevelt, of the New York World and Joseph Pulitzer; and further prosecutions of sugar refiners for attempts to defraud the government of full duties on imported sugar. Other work by Stimson's office included: peonage prosecutions, a negligence case against the captain of the General Slocum, and a brief for a case arising from the Brownsville affair. In addition Stimson wrote his comments on candidates to fill judicial vacancies and sent detailed opinions to Herbert Parsons and William Bennet on proposed revisions of the federal penal laws. Stimson's reports to Attorneys General William H. Moody, Charles J. Bonaparte, and George W. Wickersham (April 5, 1906, August 10, 1906, December 22, 1906, July 15, 1907, and August 14, 1908) are useful summaries of the work being carried on in the office. Other frequent correspondents include Alfred W. Cooley, Henry Hoyt, and Elihu Root.

Reel: 11
General Correspondence.

March 2, 1906-September 30, 1907

Herbert Parson's bill providing for an additional district judge was passed in May, 1906. Stimson supported the man eventually chosen to fill the position, C.M. Hough. By summer, after a half year in office, Stimson brought indictments against the New York Central Railroad and the American Sugar Refining Company. In a letter to his father, July 1, 1907, he explained his participation in the cases and discussed the movement to curb the trusts. Verdicts of guilty against both companies were returned in the fall, and Stimson received a personal note from the president. In 1906 the New York Republican party faced a strong challenge from the Democratic candidate for governor, William Randolph Hearst. Stimson sought and received Theodore Roosevelt's support for the nomination of Charles Evans Hughes. During the summer before the campaign Stimson had indicted Hearst's rival, James Gordon Bennett, publisher of the New York Herald, on a charge based on the paper's scandalous personals column. When Hearst claimed credit for the investigation during the campaign Root urged Stimson to delay the proceedings (October 4, 1906). Stimson was unwilling to acquiesce even though urged by Herbert Parsons in a letter, October 20, 1906. He stated his reasons in a letter to Root on October 8, 1906. Herbert Parsons consulted Stimson in January, 1907, on the final report of the Commission to Revise and Codify the Laws of the United States. For other discussions of legal procedure and office policy see letters from Henry A. Wise, William H. Moody, Charles J. Bonaparte, Henry Hoyt, and Winfred Denison. Numerous letters from Alfred Stearns and James H. Ropes discuss the operation of Phillips Academy and the moving of the Andover Theological Seminary to the Harvard Campus. There are letters from Stimson's uncle, Henry A. Stimson, discussing points of the settlement.

Reel: 15
General Correspondence.

October 1, 190-November 30, 1908

Between February and November, 1908, several important cases came under Stimson's jurisdiction as United States attorney. He wrote the brief in support of a lower court decision against the master of the General Slocum, Captain Van Schaick, whose ship had burned, taking 1,000 lives. Ezra R. Thayer wrote letters to Stimson in February supporting his position. Letters from Theodore Roosevelt, Senator William E. Borah, and Senator John Coit Spooner in May mention the "Brownsville Case." Roosevelt had ordered the blanket dismissal of over one hundred black soldiers from the army after an incident in the Texas town. The president's power to discharge soldiers en masse was challenged in Judge Hough's court by a dismissed member in April. Stimson wrote a brief supporting the president's action. All through the summer Stimson was preparing a case against Charles W. Morse for violations of the banking laws. There are many letters of congratulation on the successful completion of this case in November. There are several letters that give an overview of these cases and other office business: Alfred W. Cooley to Stimson, April 28; Stimson to his sister Candace, May 3; to Lewis A. Stimson, June 13; a twenty-seven page draft of a report to Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte, August 14; and D. Frank Lloyd's "Record of Important Happenings During Your Absence" to Stimson, September 19. Other correspondents in this reel include: Winfred T. Denison, Herbert Parsons, Charles Evans Hughes, William Loeb, George B. Cortelyou, Alfred Stearns, James Ropes, Alfred Ripley, Henry A. Stimson, and Gifford Pinchot.

Reel: 16
General Correspondence.

August 7, 1908-September 19, 1910

Volume 1: 1908 August 7 - 1909 November 9; Volume 2: 1909 November 9 - 1910 September 19; Stimson resigned his position as United States attorney for the Southern District of New York in March, 1909. There are no letters in this reel which concern any work of the office prior to that date. After his resignation, however, Stimson did maintain close ties with the Justice Department and the administration. He corresponded with George W. Wickersham on cases involving the sugar refining industry and on other matters related to his term as district attorney. Stimson also wrote to Elihu Root and President Taft on appointments and pending legislation. During the summer of 1909 Stimson's friend, Gifford Pinchot, charged Secretary of Interior Richard Ballinger with the misuse of public lands. In August Stimson asked Thomas Burke for information about Ballinger and wrote to Pinchot frequently. He declined to act as Pinchot's counsel, however, at a congressional investigation of the controversy, but did secure the services of George Wharton Pepper. Besides letters to Pinchot and Pepper there are letters relating to the case to William Kent, A.C. Shaw, George W. Wickersham, and Louis D. Brandeis. Stimson corresponded with Thomas Shipp and John F. Bass about the National Conservation Association. There are several letters to New York legislators supporting bills for the short ballot, direct primaries, penal reform, and an end to the evils of "Raines Law hotels." Other correspondents on these subjects include Charles Evans Hughes and George Cobb. Other subjects discussed include Phillips Academy, Andover, and lectures at the Harvard School of Business Administration.

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