One condition which all 17th century European colonies in the Americas shared was



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1. D

One condition which all 17th century European colonies in the Americas shared was


  1. some degree of self-government.

  2. the presence of African slavery.

  3. encouragement and subsidization of immigration.

  4. economies influenced by mercantilist policies.

  5. good relations with the Native American peoples.

2. B

A factor that played a part in the decline of European immigration to the United States in the period immediately following the Revolution was the


  1. instability of the government under the Articles of Confederation.

  2. breakdown of the indenture system.

  3. refusal of the British to transport Europeans to the United States.

  4. economic depression which followed the Revolution.

  5. Continental System of Napoleon Bonaparte.

3. E

The Boston Tea Party was a demonstration of the opposition of colonial merchants to


  1. the high tax on tea.

  2. the importation of tea from England.

  3. high British tariffs on the import of colonial tea.

  4. unfair competition from the Dutch East India Company.

  5. British restrictions of the sale of tea.

4. E

Which of the following activities were permitted the American colonists by the British Acts of Navigation and Trade (the Navigation Acts)?

A: They could use American-built ships to trade within the Empire.


B: They could ship fish from America to southern Europe.
C: They could import sugar and molasses from the British West Indies tax-free.
D: They could manufacture certain products not manufactured in Great Britain.

  1. A, only

  2. B, only

  3. C, only

  4. D, only

  5. all of the above

5. B

A major objection of the American colonists in the 18th century to the British Acts of Trade and Navigation was that the colonists were


  1. required to maintain a favorable balance of trade with the mother country.

  2. required to export cotton, tobacco, and indigo only to Great Britain.

  3. forbidden to engage in the fur trade west of the Appalachians.

  4. forbidden to buy sugar and molasses from the British West Indies.

  5. forbidden to build ocean-going ships.

6. C

A feature of the American political system not adopted from practice in England is


  1. appeal of disputed court decisions to a higher court.

  2. legislative control of government finances.

  3. local government through town meetings.

  4. a bicameral legislature

  5. trial by a jury of one's peers

7. B

Farmers objected to the Land Ordinance of 1785 because


  1. the price per acre of land was too high.

  2. the minimum land purchase cost $640 in cash.

  3. the purchaser could not subdivide his land for resale.

  4. one-sixth of the land was reserved for veterans who could cash in their warrants.

  5. land could be sold to companies but not individuals.

8. A

Which of the following quotations could be attributed to a frontiersman of the 1760's, waging a losing fight against depression, unfair taxes, corrupt officials, and an Assembly controlled by Eastern planters?


  1. "As a poor Piedmont farmer from South Carolina, I finally joined the Regulators Association in their fight against these public grievances."

  2. "We Scotch-Irish of southwest Pennsylvania cannot see why we should not resist the excise tax on our liquor."

  3. "...as a result I joined up with Nathaniel Bacon, and even though the Governor hanged twenty of us, we got some relief from the Assembly."

  4. "We Paxton boys had to take matters into our own hands in order to get the Quakers who control the Assembly to do anything."

  5. "Congress has finally adopted the Continental Association, which should get us some redress from the Crown."

9. A

Which person is correctly paired with a plan he favored at the Constitutional Convention?


  1. John Dickinson of Delaware - establishment of a limited monarchy

  2. Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts - a unicameral legislature

  3. Rufus King of Massachusetts - a parliamentary form of government

  4. Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania - election of a President for life

  5. Alexander Hamilton - popular control of the judiciary

10. D

The primary reason for the failure of the Albany Congress plan of union was that


  1. the end of the French and Indian War eliminated the need for union.

  2. colonial governors feared a reduction of loyalty to the crown if unity was established.

  3. the Iroquois threatened war if colonial unity was accomplished.

  4. colonial legislatures feared a reduction in their own authority if a pan-colonial Congress were created.

  5. the French evacuation of Fort Duquesne reduced the impetus toward unity.

11. C

A major purpose behind the convention of the Albany Congress of 1754, besides attempting to establish colonial unity, was to


  1. assess the readiness of the colonies to defend themselves against the French.

  2. ratify a formal declaration of war against France.

  3. make possible an alliance between the colonies and the Iroquois Confederation.

  4. elect a President-General for the colonies.

  5. raise funds for the defense of the colonies.

12. E

The U.S. Constitution differed from most existing state constitutions in 1787 in its provision for


  1. a bicameral legislature

  2. an appointive judiciary

  3. separation of powers

  4. the origin of revenue bills in the lower House

  5. an executive with strong powers

13. C

Sectionalism at the Constitutional convention was most evident in the dispute over the


  1. advisability of revising the Articles of Confederation.

  2. New Jersey and Virginia plans.

  3. regulation of foreign commerce.

  4. deteremination of office-holding qualifications.

  5. right of states to issue paper currency.

14. D

An important immediate result of the American Revolution was that it


  1. led to a rejection of the European political experience.

  2. strengthened the doctrine of nationalism over that of states' rights.

  3. further developed the doctrine of centralization of power.

  4. accelerated the trend toward the abolition of the laws of entail and primogeniture.

  5. established a quasi-mercantilist system of protectionist policies.

15. B

Which English tradition or practice was least acceptable to most of the thirteen colonies?


  1. trial by a jury of one's peers

  2. feudal patterns of land ownership

  3. civil liberties

  4. importance of common law

  5. merchant capitalism

16. E

Which statement was not used by the British government to justify taxing the colonies after 1763?


  1. the British national debt had increased as a result of the French and Indian War.

  2. Heavy administrative expenses were associated with maintaining the Empire.

  3. The colonies should contribute to paying the expenses involved in providing for their own defense.

  4. The colonies enjoyed virtual representation in Parliament.

  5. The tax burden was uniform throughout the Empire.

17. E

A significant achievement of the Congress under the Articles of Confederation was its


  1. ability to compel the states to surrender their claims to western lands.

  2. decision to declare independence from Great Britain.

  3. encouragement of domestic industry by the passing of protectionist legislation.

  4. negotiation of a commercial treaty with Great Britain.

  5. the creation of a postal system.

18. A

The Articles of Confederation provided that


  1. each state have one vote in Congress.

  2. the Chief Executive be responsible to Congress.

  3. Congress consist of two houses.

  4. Congressmen be directly elected by qualified males.

  5. a unanimous vote by Congress be required to pass a law.

19. E

The idea of a "fixed" or written Constitution emerged in the United States most directly from


  1. the writings of Thomas Paine.

  2. the theories set forth by John Dickinson in his "Letters From a Farmer."

  3. the experience under the Articles of Confederation.

  4. the colonial experience of Massachusetts under the Mayflower Compact.

  5. the quarrel between the colonists and Parliament in the decade preceding the Revolution.

20. C

The interpretation which historian Charles A. Beard presents of the Constitutional Convention differed from previous studies in stressing that the delegates were most concerned with designing a government which would


  1. maintain essential state powers.

  2. provide for the general welfare of all the states.

  3. safeguard property rights.

  4. prevent the abuse of judicial authority.

  5. prove the superiority of republican government to the monarchical systems in place in the rest of the world.

21. A

The ratification of the Constitution was opposed by the


  1. people in frontier farming districts.

  2. clergy and people with strong religious beliefs.

  3. large plantation owners in the South.

  4. financial interests and businessmen in the North.

  5. merchants and commercial interests.

22. A

The original United States Constitution encouraged the free exchange of political ideas by


  1. providing for congressional immunity.

  2. guaranteeing voting rights to educated people.

  3. creating the electoral college.

  4. providing for the formation of political parties.

  5. providing for the direct election of United States Senators.

23. D

The Constitution in its original form left voting qualifications in the category of residual powers because of the


  1. desire to follow the practice of the English borough system.

  2. unwillingness of the Federal Government to bear the expense of policing elections.

  3. realization that more state and local officials would be elected than federal officials.

  4. widespread variation of voting requirements in the states.

  5. conviction of the Framers that the power to define citizenship should rest with the states.

24. E

With respect to interstate agreements, the original Constitution states that


  1. such agreements are expressly forbidden.

  2. a state may impose a tariff upon another state's exports only if the tariff is reciprocal.

  3. a state may exercise civil and economic discrimination against citizens of another state.

  4. a state may force the extradition of a criminal who has fled to another state.

  5. states are forbidden to enter into compacts with each other without the consent of Congress.

25. C

Which quotation from the United States Constitution is not consistent with British governmental practice and political tradition?


  1. "All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives."

  2. "The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless . the public safety may require it."

  3. "The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution."

  4. "All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives."

  5. "The Congress shall have the power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises."

26. C

The government provided by the United States Constitution differs from the British parliamentary system in its


  1. direct election of members of the lower house of the legislature.

  2. failure to provide explicitly for political parties.

  3. strict separation of the de facto powers of the executive and legislative branches.

  4. guarantee of civil liberties.

  5. immunity granted to members of the legislature.

27. E

Which quotation expresses a political idea of Thomas Jefferson?


  1. "Our Constitution is so simple and practical that it is possible always to meet extraordinary needs with mere changes in emphasis and arrangement."

  2. "Our New Nationalism calls for an extension of the power of the Federal Government to become the steward of human welfare."

  3. "Sound policy requires such an adjustment of imposts (tariffs) as to encourage the development of the industrial interests."

  4. "I consider the power assumed by one state to annul a law of the United States as incompatible with the existence of the union."

  5. "You cannot extend the mastery of the government over the daily life of a people without somewhere making it the master of peoples' souls and thoughts."

28. A

With respect to the modern use of the term "labor relations," there were no labor relations issues in the colonies because


  1. there was no wage-earning class as such.

  2. wages and benefits were much higher than in Europe.

  3. skilled workers came to the colonies in great number.

  4. a steady stream of cheap immigrant labor was available.

  5. the presence of slavery throughout the colonies, even in the North, eliminated any concern for labor.

29. E

One reason for the development of indenture employed in the early colonial period was


  1. a desire to reduce the traffic in slaves.

  2. Parliament's refusal to allow skilled craftsmen to emigrate.

  3. the lack of trained domestic help on the large Patroon estates along the Hudson Valley.

  4. the desire to assist religious refugees.

  5. the scarcity of labor in the colonies.

30. E

By 1760, which area consumed more agricultural products than it produced?


  1. The Carolinas

  2. The Tidewater Region

  3. The Middle Atlantic colonies

  4. The far Southern colonies

  5. New England

31. C

The growth of the plantation system in New England in the 18th century tended to be prevented by


  1. climatic conditions which severely restricted the number of harvests.

  2. a labor force made up chiefly of itinerant workers.

  3. the Northern landowner who was more likely to invest profits in commercial enterprises than in more land.

  4. colonial laws which made it difficult to acquire more land.

  5. a surplus of skilled labor which made manufacturing more profitable than agriculture.

32. A

When did American economic institutions begin to be shaped in a capitalist framework?


  1. during the colonial period

  2. during the Federalist Era

  3. during the Jacksonian Era

  4. during the Civil War

  5. during the late 1890's

33. B

Prior to 1763, the British government generally followed a policy of salutary neglect toward the American colonies because it


  1. wished to secure the loyalty of the colonies.

  2. lacked a well-organized imperial system.

  3. lacked the legal power to make colonial laws.

  4. carried on little trade with the colonies.

  5. rejected the idea of mercantilism.

34. D

On the basis of the neutrality legislation passed in the 1930's, one could make the generalization that Congress believed the United States could stay out of the war by


  1. seeking allies among nations with similar aims.

  2. discouraging aggression by threatening naval reprisals.

  3. maintaining superior land and naval forces.

  4. restricting loans to and trade with belligerents.

  5. supporting international organizations designed to maintain peace.

35. D

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

Speaker B was apparently a resident of


  1. New York.

  2. Massachusetts.

  3. New Jersey.

  4. Virginia.

  5. Rhode Island

36. D

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

Speaker B was apparently making reference to


  1. Bacon's Rebellion.

  2. Leisler's Rebellion.

  3. Dorr's Rebellion.

  4. Shays' Rebellion.

  5. the Whiskey Rebellion.

37. A

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

The people who instigated the outbreak mentioned by Speaker B would probably not have favored


  1. lifetime tenure for the judiciary.

  2. the issuance of cheap money.

  3. a suspension of farm foreclosures.

  4. lower property qualifications for voting.

  5. increased representation of the frontier in the state legislature.

38. C

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

Which speaker expressed ideas which were similar to the beliefs of Alexander Hamilton?


  1. A

  2. B

  3. C

  4. D

  5. E

39. C

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

Which speaker apparently most admired the British form of government?


  1. A

  2. B

  3. C

  4. D

  5. E

40. E

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

Which speaker agreed most completely with the view of the Constitution held by Thomas Jefferson at the time?


  1. A

  2. B

  3. C

  4. D

  5. E

41. B

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

The "dual form of government" mentioned by Speaker A refers to


  1. the system of checks and balances.

  2. the principle of federalism.

  3. the separation of powers.

  4. acceptance of delegated and implied powers.

  5. the two methods provided for amending the Constitution.

42. D

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

Which speaker expressed an opinion similar to the feelings of Patrick Henry about the Constitution?


  1. A

  2. B

  3. C

  4. D

  5. E

43. A

Read the statements made by the five following speakers in 1788, and then answer the question.

SPEAKER A: I favor the adoption of the new Constitution. It provides the dual form of government which we have not enjoyed under the Articles. True, the Constitution is filled with many compromises; but compromise is the essence of the democratic process.

SPEAKER B: I hope this new Constitution will be ratified, despite the fact that my friend and neighbor George Mason refused to sign it. The recent outbreak of violence in the North was terrible. I hope this new government will be able to prevent such outbursts.

SPEAKER C: I am pleased that the new government will be adequate to the protection of property and the encouragement of trade. I do wish, however, that the legislature should be further removed from the influence of the people. Both Congress and the President should have much longer terms.

SPEAKER D: This new government will not be democratic enough. It will drain power away from the states and gives no guarantees of the rights of the people. The entire structure is arranged to give advantage to the rich, who dominated the Convention in the first place.

SPEAKER E: I have mixed feelings about the proposed Constitution. But I shall allow myself to be guided by our minister to France, who urges ratification in the hope that the process of amendment will remedy the deficiencies which appear in it.

Which speaker expressed an opinion about the Constitution similar to the one held by Benjamin Franklin?


  1. A

  2. B

  3. C

  4. D

  5. E

44. C

The delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787 were most strongly influenced by their


  1. faith in direct democracy.

  2. distrust of state governments.

  3. fear of unchecked majorities.

  4. belief in compulsory education.

  5. belief that slavery was declining and would soon die out on its own.

45. D

The Framers of the Constitution made no provision for


  1. its ratification.

  2. a system of federal courts.

  3. particpation by voters in elections for the House of Representatives.

  4. nomination of the President.

  5. a process for treaty ratification.

46. A



http://castlelearning.com/review/courses/apushist/apa8.gif?v=20001229052356.gif

The United States after the conclusion of the 1783 Treaty of Paris comprised the territory on the map labeled



  1. A

  2. B

  3. C

  4. D

  5. E

47. C

The Framers were deliberately vague in their description of structure and function in


  1. Article I of the Constitution.

  2. Article II of the Constitution.

  3. Article III of the Constitution.

  4. Article IV of the Constitution.

  5. Article V of the Constitution.

48. C

All of the following tribes were members of the Iroquois Confederation except the


  1. Mohawk.

  2. Cayuga.

  3. Mohican.

  4. Onondaga.

  5. Seneca.

49. A

Which of the following names is associated with the leadership of the Indians in the French and Indian War of 1754-1763?


  1. Pontiac

  2. Tecumseh

  3. Hiawatha

  4. Red Cloud

  5. Wovoka

50. C

The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 is important because it established


  1. a policy for the sale of public land in small parcels.

  2. a precedent for national control of conservation policies.

  3. a democratic pattern for governing territories as they move toward statehood.

  4. the right of slave owners to bring their human property with them into national territories.

  5. the right of territorial militias to defend the borders of adjacent states.

51. D

In adopting the principle of the separation of powers, the reasoning of the framers was influenced most directly influenced by the writings of


  1. John Locke.

  2. Rousseau.

  3. Voltaire.

  4. Montesquieu.

  5. Adam Smith.

52. D

Listed below are five events of the Revolutionary Era, not necessarily in chronological order. Which arrangement would place them in the correct order?

A-The Battle of Saratoga


B-The publication of Common Sense
C-The Battle of Yorktown
D-The Treaty of Paris
E-The Franco-American Alliance

  1. A-B-C-D-E

  2. C-B-D-E-A

  3. E-B-A-C-D

  4. B-A-E-C-D

  5. D-E-A-B-C

53. D

Which of the following names is paired with a contribution he made during the Revolutionary Era?


  1. Samuel Adams - led the opposition to writs of assistance

  2. James Otis - rejected the distinction between internal and external taxation

  3. Patrick Henry - organized the first committee of correspondence

  4. Thomas Paine - urged the American people to aim for independence, not merely reform

  5. John Adams - prosecuted the British soldiers in the Boston Massacre trial

54. A

Which of the following government activities can be described as a concurrent power?


  1. taxation

  2. coinage of money

  3. conclusion of treaties

  4. diplomatic relations

  5. marriage laws

55. B

Congressional immunity prevents


  1. the taxation of the salary of a member of Congress.

  2. prosecution of a member of Congress for remarks made on the floor during a session.

  3. impeachment of a member of Congress for high crimes and other offenses.

  4. subjecting members of Congress to military service.

  5. arrest of a Congressman by a foreign power while traveling abroad.

56. B

Great Britain's policy of mercantilism as applied to the Thirteen Colonies is best illustrated by the


  1. indentured servant system.

  2. passage of the Acts of Trade and Navigation.

  3. signing of the Mayflower Compact.

  4. drafting of the Albany Plan of Union.

  5. importation of slaves into Virginia.

57. D

Which of the following is an illustration of the idea of federalism?


  1. Congress passes laws which the President then enforces.

  2. The President appoints his cabinet, but the Senate must confirm them.

  3. The Supreme Court can declare an act of Congress unconstitutional.

  4. Congress regulates interstate commerce, while state governments regulate commerce within the states.

  5. Congress in empowered to impeach the President.

58. C

Which of the following actions would be permissible under the Constitution of the United States?


  1. Florida refuses admission to refugees from Cuba.

  2. Texas levies a tax on jewelry imported from Mexico.

  3. New York lowers the voting age to sixteen.

  4. Congress levies a tax on Iowa corn being shipped to India.

  5. Oregon passes a bill setting a tariff on goods imported from Idaho.

59. A

Which of the following newspaper headlines implies an action of the United States Senate?


  1. U.S. Joins NATO

  2. Korea Invaded - U.S. Sends Troops

  3. Red Missiles in Cuba - U.S. Blockade Begins

  4. U.S. Insists on Open Door in China

  5. Impeachment Articles Approved - Nixon Resigns

60. B

Which idea would John Locke most probably have rejected?


  1. Government derives its power from the people.

  2. The King should rule as God's representative on earth.

  3. The people possess natural rights.

  4. Revolution is justified when the government violates the social contract.

  5. The paramount rights are the right to live, the right to be free, and the right to own and use property.

61. B

An important cultural achievement of the Colonial period was the


  1. development of a distinctive style of American music.

  2. widespread printing of newspapers and periodicals.

  3. advancement of medical science that eliminated the superstitions still common in Europe.

  4. establishment of apprenticeship schools for children of factory workers.

  5. abolition of slavery in all but the deep southern colonies.

62. C

The basic conflict between Britain and her American colonies after 1763 centered on


  1. French aid to the colonies in the aftermath of her defeat in the French and Indian War.

  2. impressment of American sailors.

  3. enforcement of British imperial policy.

  4. the British incitement of the Indians to attack colonial settlements.

  5. British abandonment of mercantilism, which had been of benefit to the colonies.

63. E

The Federal Constitution was an improvement over the Articles of Confederation in that the Constitution in its original form


  1. provided for an elected legislature.

  2. contained a Bill of Rights.

  3. gave the national government control over national territory outside the states.

  4. represented each state equally.

  5. provided for a chief executive.

64. C

Which argument against ratification of the Constitution was used least?


  1. The President might become too powerful.

  2. The states would lose their sovereignty.

  3. A bicameral legislature would be unworkable.

  4. A Bill of Rights was absent.

  5. The Convention had not been authorized to write a new constitution.

65. A

Originally, the main purpose of establishing a government which separated powers was to


  1. decrease the possibility of tyranny.

  2. protect the power of the states.

  3. insure quick passage of legislation.

  4. reduce the power of the courts.

  5. increase the authority of the Congress.

66. C

Which action would be required to increase the length of the term of office of members of the House of Representatives?


  1. enactment of a law by Congress

  2. a resolution of both houses of Congress

  3. a constitutional amendment

  4. approval of the voters in each state

  5. approval of the President

67. B

Debate is likely to be shorter in the House than in the Senate because the House


  1. remains in session for a shorter period of time.

  2. has rules that limit debate.

  3. only considers bills after the Senate has passed them.

  4. is generally composed of less experienced members.

  5. is up for re-election every two years, not every six.

68. A

The Constitution of the United States prohibits thepassage of a bill of attainder. The effect of this provision is that a citizen is guaranteed


  1. a trial.

  2. the right to vote.

  3. the right to bear arms.

  4. freedom of religion.

  5. freedom of speech.

69. A

Which of the following statements is true of both the government of the United States and the government of Great Britain?


  1. The lower house of the legislature is elected by the voting public.

  2. Cabinet members may introduce bills in the legislature.

  3. The Chief Executive may be removed from office by impeachment.

  4. The courts may rule on the "constitutionality" of legislation.

  5. The Head of State is also the head of the government.

70. A

Britain's policy of "salutary neglect" toward her colonies was chiefly a result of her


  1. involvement in European wars and civil wars.

  2. explorations of the New World.

  3. rejection of mercantilism.

  4. victory over the power of the monarch in 1689.

  5. fear of revolution in the colonies.

71. A

Which of the following is no longer an active provision of the U.S. Constitution?


  1. the three-fifths compromise

  2. the Connecticut Compromise

  3. election of the President by the Electoral College

  4. reserved or residual powers of the states

  5. restriction on export taxes

72. C

The original Constitution as ratified in 1789 lacked a bill of rights, but it did guarantee some civil liberties to the people. By its provisions, the citizen was protected against


  1. the levying of a poll tax by the states.

  2. the suspension of the right to a writ of habeas corpus.

  3. having to pass a religious test before being elected or appointed to a Federal office.

  4. involuntary servitude.

  5. an inability to exercise voting rights because of race.

73. E



http://castlelearning.com/review/courses/apushist/apa32.gif?v=20001229052312.gif

The illustration refers to a political practice designed to



  1. intimidate reluctant voters and thus alter the outcome of an election.

  2. misrepresent the policy positions of the opposition party through the use of negative campaign advertisements.

  3. use the power of the press to erode the respectability of the opposition party.

  4. provide employment for artists and thus attract the political support of the cultural elite.

  5. redraw the boundaries of congressional districts so as to eliminate seats held by the opposition party.

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