North vs. South Poster board Activity Documents



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North vs. South Poster board Activity Documents

1) North-South Comparisons




Personal Income per capita by region as a percentage of US average



North

South

Proportion of nation’s population

71

29

Proportion of nation’s

white population

79

21

black population

13

87

Proportion of nation’s railroads

71

29

Proportion of nation’s farm acreage

65

35

Proportion of nation’s manufacturing workers

92

8

Proportion of nation’s manufacturing output

92

8

Number of factories

110,000

18,000

Railroad mileage

22,000

9,000



2) North and South: Different Cultures, Same Country


3) How many soldiers fought in the Civil War?

At the beginning of the war the Northern states had a combined population of 22 million people. The Southern states had a combined population of about 9 million. This disparity was reflected in the size of the armies in the field. The Union forces outnumbered the Confederates roughly two to one.





4) How many soldiers died in the Civil War as compared to other American wars?

Roughly 1,264,000 American soldiers have died in the nation's wars--620,000 in the Civil War and 644,000 in all other conflicts. It was only as recently as the Vietnam War that the amount of American deaths in foreign wars eclipsed the number who died in the Civil War.





5) What were the bloodiest battles of the Civil War?


6) What is a casualty?

Too often, people take 'casualty' and 'fatality' to be interchangeable terms. In fact, a casualty is "a military person lost through death, wounds, injury, sickness, internment, or capture or through being missing in action." Essentially, a casualty is any soldier who goes into a fight and does not return fit to take part in the next battle. Many soldiers, especially in the Confederate ranks, became casualties several times: some soldiers were captured multiple times; some were wounded in non-consecutive engagements.



7) What caused casualties during a battle?

8) Strengths and Weaknesses of the North vs. South

On paper, the Union outweighed the Confederacy in almost every way. Nearly 21 million people lived in 23 Northern states. The South claimed just 9 million people — including 3.5 million slaves — in 11 confederate states. Despite the North's greater population, however, the South had an army almost equal in size during the first year of the war.

The North had an enormous industrial advantage as well. At the beginning of the war, the Confederacy had only one-ninth the industrial capacity of the Union. But that statistic was misleading. In 1860, the North manufactured 97 percent of the country's firearms, 96 percent of its railroad locomotives, 94 percent of its cloth, 93 percent of its pig iron, and over 90 percent of its boots and shoes. The North had twice the density of railroads per square mile. There was not even one rifleworks in the entire South.



The South could produce all the food it needed, though transporting it to soldiers and civilians was a major problem. The South also had a great nucleus of trained officers. Seven of the eight military colleges in the country were in the South.


9) Table:� Black and White Population, 1860




Region

White

Free black

Slave

Total

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

New England

3,110,480

99.2%

24,711

0.8%

0

0.0%

3,135,191

100.0%

Mid-Atlantic

7,327,548

98.2%

131,272

1.8%

18

0.0%

7,458,838

100.0%

Midwest

7,833,904

99.2%

65,719

0.8%

17

0.0%

7,899,640

100.0%

Upper South

4,463,501

76.4%

183,369

3.1%

1,195,985

20.5%

5,842,855

100.0%

Lower South

3,573,199

55.9%

67,418

1.1%

2,754,526

43.1%

6,395,143

100.0%

Far West

382,149

98.9%

4,259

1.1%

0

0.0%

386,408

100.0%

United States

26,690,781

85.8%

476,748

1.5%

3,950,546

12.7%

31,118,075

100.0%


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