Newport High School Summer Reading Program: Instructions and Resources



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Newport High School Summer Reading Program:
Instructions and Resources

Grades 9-12

2015-2016
Items included in this packet:

Directions and grading criteria for responses

Student resources

Reading Assignments

Table of Contents
Letter to Students…………………………………………………………………………………………………3

Parent Letter………………………………………………………………………………………………………4

Grades 9 through 12…………………………..…………………………………………………………………..5

Fiction Assignment…………………… ……………………………………………………….……………...11

Non-Fiction Assignment………………… ……………………………………………………………………17

Resources………………………………………………………………………………………………………..20



Campbell County Public Library Locations:

www.cc-pl.org

Cold Spring Branch – 3920 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076……………………………859-781-6166

Carrico/Fort Thomas Branch – 1000 Highland Avenue, Fort Thomas, KY 41075………………859-572-5033

Newport Branch – 901 East 6th Street, Newport, KY 41071……………………………………..859-572-5035
Barnes and Noble

www.barnesandnoble.com

1 Levee Way #2127, Newport, KY 41071…………………………………..……………………..859-581-2000
Newport High School E-Books

http://destiny.newport.kyschools.us

Choose the high school

Login: students use regular login info.

Go to the power search tab

Type in a keyword

Use the dropdown to change the material type to Electronic book search

Click the read it button next to the title, and then open it on the next screen


Letter to Students


Dear Newport High School Student,
Welcome to Summer Reading 2015! It is our hope that you will spend the summer months reading and enjoying fiction and non-fiction books of your choice. The goals of summer reading are:

    • Advance literacy and academic performance by engaging children and teens in reading and reading-related activities during the summer months.

    • Increase successful reading experiences through district-supported, self-selected, voluntary reading.

    • Involve parents and all family members in the summer reading experience.

This year, all students in grades nine through twelve must complete a summer reading assignment. The benefits of reading during the summer months are applicable to all students and we hope that every one of you takes advantage of this opportunity. Please be aware that there is accountability involved. You are expected to complete the following assignments for your reading.


In August, all English teachers will collect and grade the assignments based on the rubric provided.
If you have any questions about Summer Reading 2015, please contact you English Teacher via email or use the NHS Summer Reading Facebook Page.
Happy reading!
Sincerely,
The English/Language Arts Department of Newport High School
Todd Bertsch……………………………………………...……………….todd.bertsch@newport.kyschools.us

Theresa Keller…………………………………….………………..………theresa.keller@newport.kyschools.us

Jennifer Steidel-Jones……………………….……………………jennifer.steidel-jones@newport.kyschools.us

Rachel Cooper……………………………………………….……………rachel.cooper@newport.kyschools.us

Dear Parent/Guardian:
Please review this English project with your son or daughter. Your child should thoughtfully complete each of the tasks enclosed, since the project itself will serve as a baseline for analyzing your child’s progress as the year unfolds. The summer project is mandatory and due the first week of class.

Please feel free to contact your child’s ELA teacher with any questions:

The following pages contain suggested titles for each grade level; students may opt to read a title other than those listed here. Students are encouraged to also consider books that are bestsellers, Pulitzer Prize winners, or that pique their interest.

We have included Lexile text measures for each of the works listed, below. The Lexile framework measures text complexity based upon sentence length and word frequency. A book receives a Lexile score that we can use to determine appropriateness for inclusion in our program. The recommended Lexile score range for grades 9 and 10 is 1080-1305. The recommended range for grades 11-12 is 1215-1355. Books within these ranges are not appropriate for all students in those grade levels. For that reason, we have provided suggestions at lower Lexile levels, but on topics of potentially high interest to students. Our goal is to help parents facilitate a challenging and targeted reading experience.

If parents are considering a work that is not on our list, they may find resources for determining the work’s Lexile text measure at: http://www.lexile.com.

You can use your child’s MAP Reading score in order to determine the appropriate Lexile range.



MAP Reading Status Norms (RIT Values and Lexile Levels)

Grade

Beginning-of-Year

End-of-Year

Lexile Range




RIT

RIT




K

147.6

156.3




1

160.2

171.9

25-325

2

179.7

189.6

350-525

3

191.6

199

550-675

4

200.1

205.8

700-775

5

206.7

211.1

800-875

6

211.6

214.8

900-950

7

215.4

217.9

975-1025

8

219.0

221.2

1050-1075

9

220.9

222.6

1100-1125

10

223.9

225.4

1150-1175

11

225.2

225.6

1200+

Please sign below and return to your child’s present English teacher.


I have read the above information regarding the mandatory English project and understand my child’s participation will help guide instruction for the beginning of the school year.
Student’s name (PRINT) _________________________Parent/Guardian Signature __________________

Date ________________________


Thank you,

The English/Language Arts Department of Newport High School



Summer Reading Assignments
Grades 9-12
2015

NINTH-GRADE

Ninth grade English covers fiction and non-fiction literature that centers on the theme Identity and Individuality. We will explore the following essential questions:

• How does conflict shape one’s identity?

• Why is the quest for independence and happiness an important but often perilous journey?

• What allows some individuals to take a stand against prejudice/oppression while others choose to participate?

• When a person’s individual choices are in direct conflict with his/her society, what are the consequences?

You must choose one fiction and one non-fiction text that thematically connect to at least one of these essential questions. Some suggested genres from which to choose are science fiction, historical fiction, coming of age, biography and autobiography, poetry, and graphic novels. The following are suggested titles:


Fiction

Non-Fiction

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith (810L)

Call Me Henri, Lorraine Lopez

Chains, Laurie Halse Anderson ( 780L)

Children of the River, Linda Crew (700L)

How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents,

Julia Alvarez (950L)



If I Stay, Gayle Forman (830L)

Jacob Have I Loved, K. Patterson

Lyddie, Katherine Patterson

Miracle's Boys, Jacqueline Woodson (660L)

Pretties, Scott Westerfield

Snow in August, Pete Hamil

Sold, Patricia McCormack

Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes, C. Crutcher

The Skin I'm In, Sharon Flake

Thirteen Reasons Why, Jay Asher (550L)

Uprising, Margaret Peterson Haddix (790L)

Wednesday Wars, Gary Schmidt (990L)

Black like Me, John Howard Griffin (990L)

Crazy for the Storm: A Memoir of Survival,

Norman Ollestad



Dough: A Memoir of Survival, Mort Zachter

Far From Home: Latino Baseball Players in

America, Tim Wendel

Hole in My Life, Jack Gantos (840L)

Into the Wild, Jon Krakauer (1270L)

1776, David McCullough (1300L)

Warriors Don’t Cry: A Searing Memoir of

the Battle to Integrate Little Rock’s

As you read each book, annotate or make notes in the margins of the book. If you borrowed the book from the library or if you are using an audio book, keep a reader’s notebook, a blog, or a wiki.


Teachers will not grade your annotations, blogs, or notes; however, you will need to use them for assignments due the first week of school.

TENTH-GRADE

Tenth grade English covers fiction and non-fiction literature that centers on the theme Lives in Transition. We will explore the following essential questions:

• How do time and place influence the actions of the individual?

• How do we evolve as our world changes?

• Does an individual have the ability to create change?

• Are our lives governed by fate or free will?

You must choose one fiction and one non-fiction text that thematically connect to at least one of these essential questions. Some suggested genres from which to choose are world mythology, science fiction, historical fiction, biography and autobiography, poetry, and graphic novels. The following are suggested titles:


Fiction

Non-Fiction

American Born Chinese, G. L. Yang

Elijah of Buxton, Christopher Paul Curtis (1070L)

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Jonathan Safran Foer (940L)

Fat Kid Rules the World, Kelly Going

First Part Last, Angela Johnson (790L)

Homeless Bird, Gloria Whelan (800L)

Identical, Ellen Hopkins (NC590L)

Kindred, Octavia Butler (580L)

Life as we Knew It, Susan Beth Pfeffer (770L)

Looking for Alaska, John Green (930L)

Marcelo in the Real World, F. X. Stork

Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac, G. Zevin

Monster, Walter Dean Myers (670L)

Rose Daughter, Robin McKinley (1210L)

Runner, Carl Deuker (670L)

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, L. See

The Help, Kathryn Stockett (730L)

The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins (810L)

The Juvie Three, Gordon Korman (NC730L)

The Last Exit to Normal, Michael Harmon (620L)

Twisted, Laurie Halse Anderson (HL680L)

Unwind, Neal Shusterman (HL740L)

Waiting for Normal, Leslie Connor (570L)

All Over but the Shoutin, Rick Bragg (1160L)

Chinese Cinderella, Adeline Yen Mah (960L)

Endurance: Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition, Caroline Alexander

Gang Leader for a Day, Sudhir Alladi Venkatesh

Gifted Hands, Ben Carson (950L)

Into Thin Air, Jon Krakauer (1320L)

Isaac’s Storm, Eric Larson

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood, Marjane Satrapi (NC380L)

Seven Years in Tibet, Heinrich Harrer

Teen Angst? Naaah…A Quasi- Autobiography, Ned Vizzini

The Forger, Cluma Schonhaus

As you read each book, annotate or make notes in the margins of the book. If you borrowed the book from the library or if you are using an audio book, keep a reader’s notebook, a blog, or a wiki.


Teachers will not grade your annotations, blogs, or notes; however, you will need to use them for assignments due the first week of school.
ELEVENTH-GRADE

Eleventh grade English covers fiction and non-fiction literature that centers on the theme War and Peace: What is the Paradox Within? We will explore the following essential questions:

• How does literature reflect aspects of the human condition?

• Should the needs of the group outweigh the needs of the individual?

• Is technology a blessing or a curse?

• Which is more powerful: love of country or love of self?

• What is justice?

You must choose one fiction and one non-fiction text that thematically connect to at least one of these essential questions. Some suggested genres from which to choose are memoir, biography and autobiography, collections of essays or speeches, 20th or 21st century novels, graphic novels, and poetry. The following are suggested titles:




Fiction

Non-Fiction

The Book Thief, Markus Zusak (730L)

Codetalker, Joseph Bruchac

Fallen Angels, Walter Dean Myers (650L)

Forgotten Fire, Adam Bagdasarian (1050L)

For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway (840L)

Milkweed, Jerry Spinelli (510L)

Sunrise over Fallujah, Walter Dean Myers (780L)

The Boy Who Dared, Susan Campbell Bartoletti (760L)

The Red Necklace, Sally Gardner (820L)

The Widow of the South, Robert Hicks


A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, Ishmael Beah

Farewell to Manzanar, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston (1040L)

Flags of our Fathers, James Bradley (950L)

Hanging by a Thread, Emmanuel Cauchy

Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years, Sarah and A. Elizabeth Delany

Human Smoke, Nicholson Baker

In Harm’s Way, Doug Stanton

Lone Survivor, Marcus Luttrell

Maus: A Survivor’s Tale, Tom Engelherdt and Art Spiegelman

Red Scarf Girl, Ji-li Jiang (780L)

Tasting the Sky, Ibtisam Barakat Baker

The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child, Francisco Jimenez

The Good Soldiers, David Finkel

The Heartless Stone: A Journey through the World of Diamonds, Deceit, and Desire, Tom Zoellner

Three Cups of Tea, Greg Mortenson (910L)

West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan-American Story, Tamim Ansary

Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China, Jung Chang

As you read each book, annotate or make notes in the margins of the book. If you borrowed the book from the library or if you are using an audio book, keep a reader’s notebook, a blog, or a wiki.


Teachers will not grade your annotations, blogs, or notes; however, you will need to use them for assignments due the first week of school.

TWELFTH-GRADE

Twelfth grade English covers fiction and non-fiction literature that centers on the theme Stony the Road We Trod: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. We will explore the following essential questions:

• How does one define the American Dream?

• How are American values corrupted by various social factors?

• How do race, gender, and economic status affect one’s social standing in America?

• What impact does war have on a nation’s social, political, economic, and emotional growth?

• How is technology transforming American society and values?

You must choose one fiction and one non-fiction text that thematically connect to at least one of these essential questions. Some suggested genres from which to choose are memoir, biography and autobiography, collections of essays, speeches, or short stories, historical novels, historical drama, poetry, and political commentary. The following are suggested titles:




Fiction

Non-Fiction

Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian, Sherman Alexie (600L)

Blade Runner: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Phillip K. Dick

Bee Season, Myla Goldberg (1050L)

Far North, Marcel Theroux

Graceling, Kirsten Cashore

Little Brother, Cory Doctorow (900L)

Sag Harbor, Colson Whitehead

The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath (1140L)

The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, Sherman Alexie (830L)

The Secret Life of Bees, Sue Monk Kidd (840L)

Up The Down Staircase, Bel Kaufman


Bushworld: Enter at Your Own Risk, by Maureen Dowd

Coal Miner’s Daughter, by Loretta Lynn and George Vecsey

Down These Mean Streets, by Piri Thomas (820L)

Founding Fathers, by Charles W. Meister

Life on the Color Line, Gregory Howard (920L)

Nickel and Dimed: On Not Getting By in America, by Barbara Ehrenreich

Our Nig: or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black, Harriet Wilson

Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell (1080L)

The Color of Water, James McBride (1240L)

The Marrow of Tradition, C. W. Chesnutt

Wait Till Next Year, Jane Goodall

Wild Trees, Richard Preston

Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl, Timothy Egan

As you read each book, annotate or make notes in the margins of the book. If you borrowed the book from the library or if you are using an audio book, keep a reader’s notebook, a blog, or a wiki.


Teachers will not grade your annotations, blogs, or notes; however, you will need to use them for assignments due the first week of school.

Newport High School

Summer Reading Assignment

Rising Grades 9-12

2015-2016

Name_________________________

Grade_______


ELA Teacher:__________________

Fiction Title:_______________________________________

Non-Fiction Title:___________________________________
Summer Reading Assignments must be turned in to ELA Teachers on August ____

Fiction Assignment Instructions for English I-IV
Fiction OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS (100 points)

  • Respond to each of the open-ended questions.

  • Be sure to answer the questions completely, using supporting details from the novel.

  • A scoring rubric has been provided to help guide your writing.

This assignment DOES NOT require students to use any reference books or internet sites in order to answer the questions.
Students are cautioned to avoid relying on sources other than the novel to answer the questions.
If a response is plagiarized, the student will not receive any points for that question.

  • Plagiarism is turning in someone else's work as your own ;copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit; failing to put a quotation in quotation marks; giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation.

Rubric:

Each question will be scored separately using the 4 point rubric.

Point breakdown is as follows: (total points earned for the 5 questions = final grade)


    • Rubric score of 4 = 16 - 20 points

    • Rubric score of 3 = 11-15 points

    • Rubric score of 2 = 6-10 points

    • Rubric score of 1 = 1-5 points

*Responses that are found to be plagiarized will receive 0 points.
Rubric Score Criteria

A 4-point response clearly demonstrates understanding of the task, completes all requirements, and provides an insightful explanation/opinion that links to or extends aspects of the text.


A 3-point response demonstrates an understanding of the task, completes all requirements, and provides some explanation/opinion using situations or ideas from the text as support.
A 2-point response may address all of the requirements, but demonstrates a partial understanding of the task, and uses text incorrectly or with limited success resulting in an inconsistent or flawed explanation.
A 1-point response demonstrates minimal understanding of the task, does not complete the requirements, and provides only a vague reference to or no use of the text. Response does not provide enough information for the teacher to evaluate.
A 0-point response is irrelevant or off-topic or has been plagiarized.

Fiction Reading Assignment (100 Points)

Book Title _______________________________________ Author __________________________________



1. Identify a significant quote from the novel and write it in the box below. (20 points)

(Page # )


Explain in detail the meaning of the quote, why you think it is important and what connections you

can make to your life or other selections of literature.

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2. Select a character from the story who is in conflict with himself or with society. Analyze the conflict and discuss the moral and ethical implications for both the individual and the society. Do not summarize the plot. (20 points)

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3. Identify the theme(s) in the novel. Give two examples of how the author presents the theme. How does this theme relate to today’s society? (20 Points)

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4. What common experiences do you share with the characters in the novel? How do you relate to these characters? How do the ethical decisions that these characters make relate to the decisions you make? (20 Points)

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5. If you could enter the story and become part of it, at which point would you enter? What events would you change and how would this alter the outcome of the story? (20 Points)

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Informational (100 points)

Book Title _______________________________________ Author __________________________________



Summary (20 Points)

Summarize your book. Use the 5 W’s – Who? What? When? Where? Why?

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Author’s Purpose (20 Points)

In this section, explain the author’s purpose in writing this book. Was this book written to instruct, inform, describe, persuade or entertain? (Choose one and explain.)

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Connections (20 Points)

In this section, make 2-4 connections to the book. You can connect the book to another text, personal events, situations, and/or cultural perspectives.





Vocabulary (20 Points)

Select 3 vocabulary words that the author uses in your book to convey the subject matter being presented. Write the sentence/quote from the book and underline the word.
1.

2.

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Final Thoughts (20 Points)

List 3 questions that you would ask the author of this book.




Resources:
Plot - A plan of action (sequenced or a chain of events, actions, episodes or steps) that the character experiences while trying to solve his problem.
Setting - The time or place the story is told.
Character - A person, animal or imaginary charter that drives the action of the story.
Exposition / Introduction - The beginning of the story where the characters and the setting is revealed.
Rising Action - This is where the events in the story become complicated and the conflict in the story is revealed (events between the introduction and climax).
Climax - This is the highest point of interest and the turning point of the story. The reader wonders what will

happen next; will the conflict be resolved or not?


Conflict or Problem - Typically a single protagonist (main character) is in an internal or external struggle to solve a problem. The internal conflict is between the character and himself (i.e., fear), or an external struggle with others, society, nature or technology.
Falling action - The events and complications begin to resolve themselves. The reader knows what has happened next and if the conflict was resolved or not (events between climax and denouement).
Resolution / Denouement - This is the final outcome or untangling of events in the story.
Theme or moral: The reason why was the story written. The author wrote the story to teach a lesson or trying to communicate a universal idea about people or human nature.

  • Examples :

    • Believe in yourself

    • People are afraid of change

    • Don't judge a book by its cover

Figurative Language:

Whenever you describe something by comparing it with something else, you are using figurative language.


Simile - A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with

the words like or as:



  • Examples:

    • The baby was like an octopus, grabbing for everything in sight.

    • The snow covered hills in the distance were like welcoming pillows to the returning mountain

climbers.
Metaphor - A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as.

  • Examples:

    • Her hair was silk .

    • The road was a ribbon of moonlight.

    • My father was the sun and the moon to me.

    • He was a library of information about baseball.



Personification - A figure of speech which gives the qualities of a person to an animal, an object, or an idea. It is a comparison which the author uses to show something in an entirely new light, to communicate a certain feeling or attitude towards it and to control the way a reader perceives it.

  • Examples:

    • The stuffed bear smiled as the little boy hugged him close.

    • The curtain was waving to everyone every time the wind blew through the open window.

Onomatopoeia - The use of words that mimic sounds. They appeal to our sense of hearing and they help bring a description to life. A string of syllables the author has made up to represent the way a sound really sounds.

  • Example:

    • Caarackle!

    • Buzz, hiss, roar, woof

    • Drip, Drop, Drip, Drop went the rain drops falling on the roof of the house.


Hyperbole - An exaggerated statement used to heighten effect. It is not used to mislead the reader, but to

emphasize a point.



  • Examples:

    • I have a ton of things to do today.

    • I’ve told you a million times to clean your room!


Text connections:

  • Text-to-Self (T-S) refers to connections made between the text and the reader's own life, experiences and feelings.

    • This reminds me of…

    • I understand how the character feels because…

    • The setting makes me think about another place…

  • Text-to-Text (T-T) refers to connections made between one text and another.

    • The character in this story is like the character in…

    • The setting in this story is the same as the setting in…

    • This event is like the event in…

    • These two stories are alike…

  • Text-to-World (T-W) refers to connections made between a text being read and something that occurs in the world. You are connecting the text to world and history events.

    • This happened in real life…

    • This is like something I heard on the news…

    • This story is similar to…




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